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Year-Round, 365 Days of Print Turns Headlines to Art

Monday, May 02, 2011

Osama bin Laden's death was proclaimed in bold, underscored headlines that claimed a rare amount of ink and inches in Monday morning's print newspapers. Online, Twitter users announced battles for front-stoop newspapers and showed how the the front page of The New York Times had transformed overnight. Meanwhile, in another corner of the Internet, newsprint and art commingled in a project called 365 Days of Print.

Launched in 2009 by artist Maya Joseph-Goteiner, the project initially began as Joseph-Goteiner's daily artistic interpretation of news items found in print journalism. In January of 2011, she decided to enlist a variety of young artists to offer their interpretations of news. ("Mining endangered print media" is the site's subheading.)

On Monday, when most everyone's eyes were trained on the news, the death of Osama bin Laden became a photo of a rose, mixed-media coffee spill and a personal declaration in the hands of the artists involved in 365 Days of Print.

"Artists have very different tools than somebody who doesn’t make art, so they can explore mediums and illicit a different kind of response," said Joseph-Goteiner. "I find a lot of people have trouble distilling the news and don’t really have the focus and the time, more than anything, to invest in more than the headlines. I think on a day like today it’s important to humanize what’s happening."

Check out a slide show of art from today's 365 Days of Print and leave your comments below.

Kenneth Pietrobono's thoughtful, poetic take on today's headlines.
Kenneth Pietrobono
Kenneth Pietrobono's thoughtful, poetic take on today's headlines.

"His image is something you can hold on to, that really can give more depth to today and historically can comment on what today was," said Maya Joseph-Goteiner of the work.

Laurie Frick
"Bang you're dead" by Laurie Frick
Sean Jerd's interpretation, almost like a hazy memory.
Sean Jerd
Sean Jerd's interpretation, almost like a hazy memory.
Megan Piontkowski's
Megan Piontkowski
Megan Piontkowski's "Osama Bin Laden is Dead"—a hole in an ace, or an ace in a hole?
Charlotte Exantus decided to skip the Osama Bin Laden headlines and remixed a photo of Donald Trump from when he addressed a Republican women's group in Las Vegas.
Charlotte Exantus
Charlotte Exantus decided to skip the Osama Bin Laden headlines and remixed a photo of Donald Trump from when he addressed a Republican women's group in Las Vegas.

Her caption reads: "I LOVE this picture! The smug look, the Jesus pose. Trump is poetry even when not in motion...I channeled “Showgirls” and glittered Trump’s suit because really who wouldn’t vote for a man in a shiny sparkly suit?"

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Comments [2]

Charles Upchurch from New York, NY

Pietrobono's piece is especially strong. More in this series can be found at http://kennethpietrobono.com

May. 03 2011 11:11 AM
Ann Moss from Texas

I have been doing this daily since 9/11 to chronicle the malfeasance of our government.
You can see a fraction of this years at http://www.flicker.com/bentfish88. We need to let them know we are watching. You can't change it, but laughing helps.

May. 02 2011 04:55 PM

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