Streams

Following Up: Access to Your Phone's Info

Friday, April 29, 2011

We now know that your phone is storing a log of your movements, but what's that information used for? Alexis Madrigal, senior editor at The Atlantic and author of Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology, clarifies whether phone tracking can help recover stolen phones--and whether law enforcement can use your phone's stored information in investigations.

Guests:

Alexis Madrigal

Comments [5]

station44025 from New York

Here's a scenario: prospective employer requires location data from your phone as part of a routine background check. They use automated searches that red-flag certain events like travel out of the country, events like rallies and political protests, signs of union activity, etc..

Apr. 29 2011 11:43 AM
Josh Neufeld from Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, NY

Just to clarify, if you're setting up the iPhone "Find My Phone" feature for the first time, it'll only work on the iPhone 4 or later models. If you still have an iPhone 3 like me, you're out of luck.

Apr. 29 2011 11:41 AM
Caitlin

Lookout is a free app for android that has a "find your phone" feature that works as long as your phone is turned on. Probably more useful if you've misplaced it, rather than had it stolen.

Apr. 29 2011 11:39 AM
station44025 from New York

This is the tool that police use to extract data from mobile devices.

http://www.cellebrite.com/forensic-products/ufed-physical-pro.html

Michigan State police have been accused of using them at traffic stops, although they deny it now. Not clear what has been happening.

Apr. 29 2011 11:38 AM
Leah from Brooklyn

Are you compelled to surrender your phone password (if you have one)?

Apr. 29 2011 11:37 AM

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