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Monday, April 25, 2011

On today’s show: ProPublica’s Jesse Eisinger and Jake Bernstein talk about “The Wall Street Money Machine,” their Pulitzer Prize-winning series that examines how some hedge funds and banks worsened the financial crisis while making a hefty profit for themselves. Peter Mountford talks about his debut novel, A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism. A legal scholar explains what we can learn about justice from the plays of William Shakespeare. Plus, “Everybody Loves Raymond” creator Phil Rosenthal discusses his documentary about developing a Russian version of his hit sitcom.

The Wall Street Money Machine

ProPublica’s Jesse Eisinger and Jake Bernstein, who were awarded the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for “The Wall Street Money Machine,” talk about the series, which examined how some hedge funds and banks worsened the financial crisis while making a hefty profit for themselves.  It’s ProPublica’s second Pulitzer in only its third year of publishing investigations, and it’s the first Pulitzer to be awarded to a group of stories that were never published in print.

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A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism

Peter Mountford talks about his debut novel, A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism. It tells the story of Gabriel, who, on his first assignment for a hedge fund goes to Bolivia at the end of 2005 to seek out insider information on the plans of the controversial president-elect. If he succeeds, it means he’ll get a bonus that would make him secure for life. But standing in his way are his headstrong mother, who is a survivor of Pinochet's Chile, and Gabriel's new love interest, the president's passionate press liaison. Gabriel sets in motion a terrifying plan that could cost him the love of all those he holds dear.

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Shakespeare and Justice

Legal scholar Kenji Yoshino, Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law at NYU School of Law, explains how Shakespeare's greatest plays demonstrate what makes a fair and just society and can elucidate some of the most troubling issues in contemporary life. A Thousand Times More Fair: What Shakespeare's Plays Teach Us About Justice addresses fundamental questions we ask about our world today: Why is the rule of law better than revenge? How much mercy should we show a wrongdoer? What does it mean to "prove" guilt or innocence?

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Exporting Raymond

“Everybody Loves Raymond” creator Phil Rosenthal discusses writing, directing, and starring in the film “Exporting Raymond,” about his journey to a foreign land to help people who don’t seem to want his help. When Rosenthal joins forces with Hollywood studio Sony Pictures Television to recreate “Everybody Loves Raymond” for Russian TV audiences (as “The Voronins”), he finds himself lost in Moscow, lost in his mission, lost in translation. He tries to connect with his Russian colleagues but runs into characters and situations that conspire to drive him insane. It opens April 29 at the Angelika and Lincoln Plaza Cinemas.

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