Streams

Underreported: The Antarctic King Crab Invasion

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Climate change is having dramatic effects on the world’s oceans as ice sheets collapse and the sea becomes more acidic. Warmer temperatures allow some deep sea predators, like King Crab, to expand their range into new areas—to the detriment of many other sea creatures. According to James McClintock, a Professor of Physiology & Ecology of Aquatic & Marine Invertebrates at the University of Alabama, an army of deep sea King Crabs are slowly working their way up the Antarctic slope, a habitat they have never been found in before, and are potentially decimating the extremely delicate marine ecosystem.

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James McClintock
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Comments [5]

Mark from Westchester

Had a friend in the food industry whos contended that these "king" crabs used to be called spider crabs but such nomenclature rendered them unpalatable. (Off point a bit, sorry.)

Apr. 21 2011 01:59 PM
Joel from westchester

soft shells -- are they due to carbonic acid?

Apr. 21 2011 01:57 PM
Joel from westchester

soft shells -- are they due to carbonic acid?

Apr. 21 2011 01:56 PM
Joel from westchester

soft shells -- are they due to carbonic acid?

Apr. 21 2011 01:56 PM

Are these the same King Crabs that Red Lobster's and such serve?

Apr. 21 2011 01:39 PM

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