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This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook: April 21 - 27

Thursday, April 21, 2011 - 12:00 AM

WNYC

The Met re-opens its rooftop with modernist sculpture. Kara Walker tackles race, power and identity in new graphite drawings. Susan Graham builds surreal landscapes out of little more than sugar and egg whites. And, for the night owls, there's a highly intriguing gathering of moody-illicit nighttime photography from the early 20th century. There are lots of arts happenings going on in good old Gotham in the coming week. Here's our guide to what's cooking:

Kara Walker: Dust Jackets for the Niggerati-and Supporting Dissertations, Drawings submitted ruefully by Dr. Kara E. Walker at Sikkema Jenkins & Co. in Chelsea Walker is probably best known for using black paper cutouts to depict real and imagined (but always grim) scenarios out of the history of American slavery. In her latest solo exhibit at Sikkema Jenkins, she explores issues of race, identity and power, but this time with a more contemporary focus: the 20th century rears its head in terms of imagery and she uses graphite drawings and text-based works. A concurrent exhibit at Lehmann Maupin on the Lower East Side will feature the artist’s latest shadow puppet videos, inspired by her own experiences in the Mississippi Delta. Opens Friday, in Manhattan.

Night at Bruce Silverstein Gallery on 24th Street Parisian street walkers, the Eiffel Tower touched by lightning, a pair of figures casting long shadows on a cobblestone street. For many European photographers working in the 1920s and ‘30s, the nighttime hours represented an opportunity to capture starkly illuminated streets, nightlife reverie and nocturnal subcultures. This exhibit of retro black and white photography brings together works by noted early 20th century shooters such as Brassai, Ilse Bing, Robert Doisneau and André Kertész — all working under the cover of darkness. Through June 4, in Manhattan.

Susan Graham: New Gardens at Schroeder Romero & Shredder in Chelsea Industrial objects such as lawnmowers and cell phone towers get a thorough reinvention at the hands of this Ohio-born artist, who turns these mechanical, all-too-human products into delicate objects crafted out of sugar and porcelain toile. Her objects have a surreal lacy-crafty feel — like nothing you’d ever see at grandma’s house. Through May 14, in Manhattan.

Radcliffe Bailey: Outer Spaceways at Jack Shainman Gallery in Chelsea Assemblages crafted out of steel and glass, paintings that incorporate photography and paper, an oversize cabinet stuffed with white, plaster heads. Bailey’s mixed-media groupings frequently reflect his obsessions with identity, history and music. This is a fine opportunity to check out his work locally — the artist has a solo exhibit opening up at the High Museum in Atlanta in June. Opens on Thursday, in Manhattan.

Anthony Caro on the Roof at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Signs that spring is upon us: the Met is opening up its roof garden — and this year the featured artist will be British sculptor Anthony Caro. A key figure in abstract modernist sculpture, he is known for using found pieces of industrial metal in abstract geometric arrangements. He does away with showy pedestals and allows viewer and sculpture to face off directly. No doubt it'll all look smashing with a rooftop gin and tonic. Opens next Tuesday, in Manhattan.

Bruce Silverstein Gallery has put on the perfect show for creatures of the night. In this 1927 image, Hungarian-born shooter André Kertész shows the crackle of lightning above the Eiffel Tower.
Courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery
Bruce Silverstein Gallery has put on the perfect show for creatures of the night. In this 1927 image, Hungarian-born shooter André Kertész shows the crackle of lightning above the Eiffel Tower.
The city that never sleeps: Ilse Bing's 1936 photograph of the Empire State Building at night — also at Silverstein.
Courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery
The city that never sleeps: Ilse Bing's 1936 photograph of the Empire State Building at night — also at Silverstein.
An untitled image by Robert Doisneau printed circa 1950 captures the evening at its moodiest.
Courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery
An untitled image by Robert Doisneau printed circa 1950 captures the evening at its moodiest.
The night can be exhausting: Doisneau's pic 'Mademoiselle Anita,' taken circa 1951.
Courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery
The night can be exhausting: Doisneau's pic 'Mademoiselle Anita,' taken circa 1951.
A whiff of the illicit. Shown here, '122, Rue de Provence, Paris,' also by Doisneau, 1952. (Printed in 1960).
Courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery
A whiff of the illicit. Shown here, '122, Rue de Provence, Paris,' also by Doisneau, 1952. (Printed in 1960).
At the Met, Anthony Caro's modernist assemblages will go on view next week when the museum reopens its roof garden.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
At the Met, Anthony Caro's modernist assemblages will go on view next week when the museum reopens its roof garden.
Susan Graham takes the natural and the man-made and remakes it out of fragile sugar. Above, 'Toile Landscape,' 2010/11, on view at Schroeder Romero & Shredder.
Courtesy the artist and Schroeder Romero & Shredder
Susan Graham takes the natural and the man-made and remakes it out of fragile sugar. Above, 'Toile Landscape,' 2010/11, on view at Schroeder Romero & Shredder.
'Flock 2,' a print by Graham at Schroeder Romero.
Courtesy the artist and Schroeder Romero & Shredder
'Flock 2,' a print by Graham at Schroeder Romero.
Atlanta artist Radcliffe Bailey unveils a solo exhibit at Jack Shainman this week — with pieces that are inspired, in part, by the out-of-this-world musician Sun Ra.
Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.
Atlanta artist Radcliffe Bailey unveils a solo exhibit at Jack Shainman this week — with pieces that are inspired, in part, by the out-of-this-world musician Sun Ra.
'Cerebral Cavern,' a mixed media piece by Bailey at Jack Shainman.
Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.
'Cerebral Cavern,' a mixed media piece by Bailey at Jack Shainman.
Kara Walker sets aside her cut-paper silhouettes for pencil and paper at Sikkema Jenkins. Shown here: 'Kilroy Was Here,' a piece from 2010/11.
Courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York
Kara Walker sets aside her cut-paper silhouettes for pencil and paper at Sikkema Jenkins. Shown here: 'Kilroy Was Here,' a piece from 2010/11.
Though in a different medium than what she is traditionally known for, Walker's pieces continue to examine questions of American history, race and power — such as this untitled drawing from 2010.
Courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York
Though in a different medium than what she is traditionally known for, Walker's pieces continue to examine questions of American history, race and power — such as this untitled drawing from 2010.

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Comments [2]

M.E. Thombs from New York, New York

FYI- East Williamsburg's NURTUREart* (contemporary fine art) Gallery and Emerging Curators' Resource Center at 910 Grand St. is definitely worth a visit. See www.nurtureart.org for emerging artist and curator opportunity listings, NURTUREart Education Outreach Program activities, gallery-resource center days-hours of operation, scheduled openings and special events, etc. Contact Gallery director and Curators' Liaison, Marco Antonini at marco@nurtureart.org.

Also at nurtureart.org- Artists and curators note the current monthly MUSE FUSE gathering's special guest presenter and professional subject; in NURTUREart Trustee, Karen Marston's, Williamsburg painting studio..

"Vita bevis, Ars longa!"
_____________________________________
*NURTUREart is WQXR FM 105.9 STAR Program's May 1- June 6, 2011 featured organization

Apr. 25 2011 01:22 AM
Sara Jo Romero

What a great selection of shows in which to be included! Many thanks for including Susan's show....we here at SR & S think it is 'must-see', too!!
--Schroeder Romero & Shredder

Apr. 22 2011 10:47 AM

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About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

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