Streams

Tina Fey and Her Bossypants

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Tina Fey talks about her career in comedy and her life before Liz Lemon, "Weekend Update," and Sarah Palin. Her book Bossypants is an account of her journey from nerd to "Saturday Night Live" and "30 Rock," and includes stories about her father, her halfhearted pursuit of physical beauty, motherhood, and her nearly fatal honeymoon.

Guests:

Tina Fey
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Comments [13]

@ Mr. Bad oh hai Centaurious. Now you're trolling here. how nice of you.
Cheers.

May. 16 2011 07:37 PM
Mr. Bad from NYC

@ Roy Zornow from East Village

I know this thread is ancient but I couldn't help but think of "smart" comedy when I saw this clip on Reddit this evening, Remember when female comedians weren't afraid to be "edgy"?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wn53QgVjyIk#t=1m22s

Apr. 25 2011 08:55 PM
Roy Zornow from East Village

Agreed Mr. Bad,

The plaudits are way out of proportion (Mark Twain award?). She takes few personal risks but somehow taps into cultural anxiety about women's changing roles. She's Zelig-like, beautiful but not excessively so, popular-but-a-nerd, etc. Underneath there is a steely determination. I think women identify with her more than feel she is funny. And I imagine she's able to make men, like Lorne Michaels, feel comfortable.

Apr. 18 2011 02:51 PM
Mr. Bad from NYC

@ Slopes from Norwalk, CT

Are you serious? "Most think she's a tremendous talent as a writer and performer"? No, I don't think so. She's famous for her very funny Palin impression, not much else, which is why I question her constant adulation by the media who no doubt value her as a corporate spokeswoman for NBC.

Face it, she "adapted" the Mean Girls script, had a small role playing someone just like herself and did OK, the movie was not my cup of tea but I'll allow that it had some entertainment value for a certain demo. After that, nothing but AWFUL bombs where she once again played someone EXACTLY like herself, Baby Mama, Date Night, both panned by critics & audiences and total bombs at the box office.

Her TV legacy is to have been the head writer of TV's least funny sketch comedy show, and arguably during its worst period, which is really saying something. Add to that her show 30 Rock which nobody watches, a vanity project which isn't funny, more or a hectoring onslaught of kind-of-clever asides, where she once again plays herself, oh no, I mean that spectacular departure from typical form, Liz Lemon...

C'mon, this whole "you go girl" is great and all but give her credit for her business acumen, not as some sort of comedic genius, she's learned how to make it with minimum talent.

Apr. 15 2011 02:04 PM
Slopes from Norwalk, CT

I was struck by Tina Fey's modesty. I think, and I think most feel, she's a tremendous talent as both a writer and performer. It's just wonderful to hear in a straight radio interview that she can just be herself and not be selling herself. It came across that she's totally interested in sharing her life in her book, not creating more fame for herself.

Apr. 15 2011 12:54 PM
Dan from Midtown

I really enjoyed the comfort level of the interview. However may favorite part was the One Calamera bridge.

Apr. 15 2011 10:31 AM
Yes and

Tina is such a role model.
I really hope she knows how big her influence is on people.
Teach it like you preach it T Fey!

Apr. 14 2011 02:15 PM
Sandra from Astoria

Tina Fey is so great!

It's scary how much I relate to the Liz Lemon character (minus the career success, ha!)--she really captures the neuroses of the modern urban woman (much more truthfully than those awful "Sex & the City" characters, yuck).

Apr. 14 2011 12:29 PM
Juliana from brooklyn, ny

Love, Love Tina Fey. Hands down on of the most talented comedians working today.

My question for her is... why can't we have a female buddy movie that doesn't revolve around weddings/relationships? I'm thinking Old School, the Hangover (not really a wedding movie...think about it), etc.

I suppose because it doesn't sell...Katherine Heigl does. Barf.

Apr. 14 2011 12:24 PM
Mr. Bad from NYC

Tina Fey is a really terrific performer, but a pretty mediocre writer - so how did she become a sort of comedy Icon? She's only done one OK movie and two TV shows, one of which is legendarily bad (SNL) and the other just a so-so, broad network comedy like the Office, but not even that funny.

As a corporate ambassador she really excels though...

Apr. 14 2011 12:18 PM

I've enjoyed all the interviews I heard with her. Tina Fey is so funny! She's got her head on right--she's so refreshing.

Thanks for all your funniness!

Apr. 14 2011 12:12 PM
Susy from NYC

I can't believe people even notice your scar, Tina. I think if I met you, I'd be more like, omg I'm meeting Tina Fey, what's it like to be Tina Fey than what's up with your scar. People are so weird.

Apr. 14 2011 12:12 PM
Maude from Park Slope

I bought Tina Fey's audiobook (which she narrates, thank you!!) and loving it.

I'm curious to know if she has any "feminist" writers who have influenced her. As I listen to the audiobook I find myself wondering if she reads BITCH magazine, for instance. I generally find feminist writing exhaustingly academic, so I wonder if she has any recommendations.

(and I'm sure she hears this all the time but she is an enormous inspiration and my hero, and I thank her for all the hard work she's done to make things a little different for ladies. frat boys might begin to think differently because of her cause they certainly are not reading Germaine Greer if you know what I mean. Thank you Tina Fey)

Apr. 14 2011 12:02 PM

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