Streams

Sidney Lumet, Dead at 86

Monday, April 11, 2011

Sidney Lumet once wrote, “While the goal of all movies is to entertain, the kind of film in which I believe goes one step further.  It compels the spectator to examine one facet or another of his own conscience.  It stimulates thought and sets the mental juices flowing.”  This is something the filmmaker did from his very first movie, “12 Angry Men” in 1957, through “Serpico,” and “Dog Day Afternoon” to “The Verdict.”  Sidney Lumet died at the age of 86 from lymphoma.  You can hear his last interview with Leonard from 2007 when he was joined by Philip Seymour Hoffman and Ethan Hawke for “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead.”

Listen to another interview with Sidney Lumet from 1993: 


Guests:

Sidney Lumet

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Comments [1]

David

Leonard and Sidney are incorrect about Cassavetes's movies being improvised. With the sole exception of his first movie, "Shadows," all of his films were scripted. Because he had such an extraordinary talent for writing such natural dialogue, people assumed that most of the dialogue in his movies was improvised.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cassavetes#Directing

"How Cassavetes used improvisation in films is frequently misunderstood. With the exception of the original version of Shadows, his films were completely scripted. Confusion arises in part because Cassavetes allowed actors to bring their own interpretations of characters to their performances. Dialogue and action were scripted, but delivery was not."

Apr. 12 2011 12:30 AM

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