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This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook: May 5 - 11

Thursday, May 05, 2011 - 12:00 AM

Fantastical dresses at the Met, heady conceptualism at MoMA, early 20th-century masters at the Jewish Museum, and stacks of posters for the taking at a SoHo Gallery. Also, did we mention it's New York Gallery Week? There's loads going on in our big, bad city. Here's our guide to what's shaking:

Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty at the Metropolitan Museum of Art In what will surely be a blockbuster show, the Met this week opens a major exhibit dedicated to the work of McQueen, a British fashion designer whose dramatic confections were as tough as they were fragile and as attentive to history as they were to the future. (His last collection featured theatrical, corseted pieces that channeled a punk-Elizabethan vibe.) Certainly, this exhibit will be getting special attention because of McQueen’s tragic suicide last year. But while his ghost may hover over the show, the roughly 100 ensembles and 70 accessories on display will surely take on a life of their own: fiercely original, totally fantastical, all laced with a grim dash of Goth. Consider this a must-see. Through July 31, in Manhattan.

Francis Alÿs: A Story of Deception at the Museum of Modern Art The heady Belgium-born conceptualist will get a survey of recent works, highlighting three recent acquisitions by the museum. Best known for his sometimes pointless gestures -- he once pushed a block of ice around the streets until it melted -- Alÿs’s works can also be in possession of an unusual beauty. (In 2008 at the Hispanic Society, he showed a collection of thrift store paintings of Saint Fabiola that was absolutely riveting.) The highlight at the MoMA show will likely be the video documentation of his 2002 work “When Faith Moves Mountains,” in which he got 500 volunteers in Lima, Peru to shift the position of a 1,600-foot sand dune. It's an effort that may seem silly on the surface, but demonstrates what a few people working together can do. Opens Sunday, in Manhattan.

Collecting Matisse and Modern Masters: The Cone Sisters of Baltimore at the Jewish Museum Over the course of a lifetime, Claribel and Etta Cone built a remarkable collection of art (containing more than 3,000 works) and one of the most significant gatherings of works by Matisse in a single collection. The Jewish Museum is now putting these and other works in the Cone sisters’ collection on display. In addition to Matisse, expect to see major works by Gauguin, Van Gogh and Courbet. Opens Friday, in Manhattan.

Jakob Kolding, Blocks at Team Gallery in SoHo The Berlin-based Jakob Kolding comes to downtown with a series of his text-and-image posters that he will present as stacks on the gallery floor — works that visitors are welcome to walk away with. Also on view will be dioramas and collages. Opens on Thursday, at the gallery’s Grand Street location, in Manhattan.

Marc Brandenburg: Version at the Goethe-Institut Wyoming Building in the East Village In collaboration with the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Goethe-Institute is showcasing an installation by an artist know for producing trippy graphite drawings that resemble photographic negatives. His piece, “Version,” will feature a clubby vibe, with screen-printed images illuminated with black light. Should be the sort of thing that makes you say, Duuuuuude. Opens Friday, in Manhattan.

Plus: It's New York Gallery Week!! This weekend, there will be oodles of openings and events going down in Chelsea, the Upper East Side, the Lower East Side and the West Village. Many galleries will be open for extended hours during this time. Things kick off this Friday, with opening receptions beginning at 6 P.M.

Double Plus: Adam Horovitz of the Beastie Boys will be DJing at MoMA on Thursday, starting at 5:30 P.M. Hellooooooo, nasty!

 

Belgian-born conceptualist Francis Alÿs gets a survey at MoMA. Shown above, documentation from his project
The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Belgian-born conceptualist Francis Alÿs gets a survey at MoMA. Shown above, documentation from his project "When Faith Moves Mountains," from 2002.
Another image from the Alÿs's 'Mountains' project — for which he had 500 volunteers shift a sand dune outside of Lima by a few inches.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Another image from the Alÿs's 'Mountains' project — for which he had 500 volunteers shift a sand dune outside of Lima by a few inches.
The collection of the Cone sisters of Baltimore — renowned for their gathering of works by Matisse — goes on view at the Jewish Museum. Above, 'Striped Robe, Fruit, and Anemones,' 1940.
The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection
The collection of the Cone sisters of Baltimore — renowned for their gathering of works by Matisse — goes on view at the Jewish Museum. Above, 'Striped Robe, Fruit, and Anemones,' 1940.
The Cones collected works by a number of European avant gardists, including Picasso. Above, 'Woman With Bangs,' from 1902.
The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection
The Cones collected works by a number of European avant gardists, including Picasso. Above, 'Woman With Bangs,' from 1902.
At Team Gallery in SoHo, Berlin-based artist Jakob Kolding will have stacks of his untitled posters on view (and free for the taking).
Courtesy the artist and Team Gallery
At Team Gallery in SoHo, Berlin-based artist Jakob Kolding will have stacks of his untitled posters on view (and free for the taking).
Another untitled image by Kolding — who will also be showing collages as part of the show.
Courtesy the artist and Team Gallery
Another untitled image by Kolding — who will also be showing collages as part of the show.
At the Met, the downright arquitectonic dresses of Alexander McQueen. Shown here: 'Plato’s Atlantis,' a piece from spring/summer 2010.
Photograph © Sølve Sundsbø / Art + Commerce courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art
At the Met, the downright arquitectonic dresses of Alexander McQueen. Shown here: 'Plato’s Atlantis,' a piece from spring/summer 2010.
McQueen was known for a dark streak in his designs. However, there were moments of levity, such as this floral number, titled 'Sarabande,' from 2007.
Photograph © Sølve Sundsbø / Art + Commerce courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art
McQueen was known for a dark streak in his designs. However, there were moments of levity, such as this floral number, titled 'Sarabande,' from 2007.

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Comments [1]

Shadeed Ahmad from New York City

Spring is on fire with beautiful and exciting art. Carolina Miranda is lavishly pouring on gasoline with "This Week: Must-See Arts in the City."

May. 01 2011 09:52 AM

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About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

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