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This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook: April 14 - 20

Thursday, April 14, 2011 - 12:00 AM

WNYC
Artist Sarah Frost is showing an arsenal of paper guns at PPOW Gallery, pieces which were crafted using instructional YouTube videos created by boys. Above, a pistol, sculpted from paper and tape. (Courtesy the artist and PPOW.)

An array of floating paper guns, paintings that chronicle Picasso's 17-year-old lover and muse, smashed up cars, sculptural drawings, public interventions and a quilt that pays tribute to the military's fallen. There's a whole lot of art going on in New York this week. Here's our guide to what's cooking:

Sarah Frost, Arsenal, at PPOW Gallery in Chelsea For her first solo exhibit at PPOW, Frost explores a highly unusual aspect of our gun culture: the online videos created by boys that show viewers how to make guns out of paper and tape. The artist used these curious D.I.Y. instructionals to create countless types of paper weaponry, which she suspends throughout the gallery. Shown only once before, in St. Louis, the show features everything from Halo-inspired assault rifles to basic handguns—some of which contain working parts, such as spinning chambers and pump-action barrels. Sounds like a total must-see to me. Opens Thursday at 6 P.M., in Manhattan.

Picasso and Marie-Thérèse: L’Amour Fou at Gagosian Gallery on 21st Street Organized by noted biographer John Richardson, the latest installment in the Gagosian Gallery’s exhibits devoted to the life of Picasso looks at the artist’s relationship with Marie-Thérèse Walter — the young woman with whom he began a largely secret affair when he was in his forties and she was a mere 17 years old. Featuring more than 80 works, including many that have never been seen in the United States before, the exhibit will chart the rise of the young Walter as one of Picasso’s (and art history’s) most significant muses. Opens Thursday at 6 P.M., in Manhattan.

Richard Serra Drawing: A Retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Though largely known for his massive Cor-ten steel sculptures, Serra has long had an innovative drawing practice as well—creating large wall pieces layered in geologic layers of black oil stick. (These look all kinds of heavy in mood and appearance.) The exhibit at the Met gathers together works produced by the artist over the course of more than 40 years and will also include a couple of new site-specific pieces. Should be chunky. Through August 28, in Manhattan.

John Chamberlain, Chamberlain at Pace, at Pace Gallery on 22nd Street Nobody knows how to mash up a car quite like Chamberlain, and in his 13th solo exhibit at Pace (he's about to move over to Gagosian Gallery), the artist is at it again. Expect bright, twisted, abstract forms that take America’s love for the automobile and put it through a shredder. Opens Friday, in Manhattan.

Leon Reid IV: A Decade of Public Art at Pandemic Gallery in Williamsburg For more than ten years, Leon Reid has worked as a graffitist, street artist and sculptural interventionist—manipulating the form and content of New York’s (and other cities’) municipal infrastructure. Under the name Verbs, he once reconfigured the signage at a Canal Street subway station to read “Verbs St - Oh Yes I Did.” The show at Pandemic brings together a wide range of his works, as well as plans for a number of unrealized pieces. If you happen to be cruising through the neighborhood, don’t miss the sneaky three-dimensional install on the roof. Opens Saturday at 7 P.M., in Brooklyn.

The Lost Heroes Art Quilt at the American Folk Art Museum in Midtown As part of a series of exhibits devoted to the art of the quilt (don’t miss the psychedelic show at the Lincoln Center Branch, which features lots of stars), the museum is unveiling a massive new quilt in honor of military personnel who have lost their lives in conflict since 2001. Titled “Without A Witness, They Will Die,” this solemn piece pays tribute to fallen from all 50 U.S. states. Opens Tuesday, in Manhattan.

Gagosian Gallery is putting on its latest Picasso installment. This show — which includes the canvas 'Le sauvetage,' from 1932 — is devoted to the artist's lover and muse Marie Thérèse Walter.
© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society. Photo Robert Bayer, Basel. Courtesy Gagosian Gallery
Gagosian Gallery is putting on its latest Picasso installment. This show — which includes the canvas 'Le sauvetage,' from 1932 — is devoted to the artist's lover and muse Marie Thérèse Walter.
At the Met, a new exhibit showcases the heavy duty drawings of Richard Serra. Shown here: 'September,' from 2001.
© Richard Serra, photo by Rob McKeever
At the Met, a new exhibit showcases the heavy duty drawings of Richard Serra. Shown here: 'September,' from 2001.
Serra's drawings have a sculptural quality to them. He layers the paintstick on so thick it makes his pieces literally come off the wall. Above, 'Untitled,' 1973.
© Richard Serra, photo by Ben Blackwell
Serra's drawings have a sculptural quality to them. He layers the paintstick on so thick it makes his pieces literally come off the wall. Above, 'Untitled,' 1973.
At PPOW, in Chelsea, Sarah Frost's array of paper guns will be seen for the first time since she first displayed them in St. Louis.
Courtesy the artist and PPOW
At PPOW, in Chelsea, Sarah Frost's array of paper guns will be seen for the first time since she first displayed them in St. Louis.
Some of Frost's paper weapons have independent, moving parts. Shown here: a mini-uzi made out of paper and tape.
Courtesy the artist and PPOW
Some of Frost's paper weapons have independent, moving parts. Shown here: a mini-uzi made out of paper and tape.
Frost draws inspiration for her exhibit from online instructional videos in which boys demonstrate how to fabricate these paper weapons. Shown here, a still from one such video.
Courtesy the artist and PPOW
Frost draws inspiration for her exhibit from online instructional videos in which boys demonstrate how to fabricate these paper weapons. Shown here, a still from one such video.
At Pandemic Gallery, in Williamsburg, artist Leon Reid IV will be displaying a decade's worth of public interventions — such as 'The Great Recession,' a piece installed in Norway in 2009.
Courtesy Leon Reid IV
At Pandemic Gallery, in Williamsburg, artist Leon Reid IV will be displaying a decade's worth of public interventions — such as 'The Great Recession,' a piece installed in Norway in 2009.
Another intervention by Reid: 'True Yank,' installed in Manchester, England, in 2009. The exhibit at Pandemic will also include unrealized projects.
Courtesy Leon Reid IV
Another intervention by Reid: 'True Yank,' installed in Manchester, England, in 2009. The exhibit at Pandemic will also include unrealized projects.
Sculptor John Chamberlain's reconfigured automobiles will be on view at the Pace Gallery, in Chelsea. Above, his work 'Smndtyrqurd,' from 2008.
© John Chamberlain / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo by: G. R. Christmas/ Courtesy The Pace Gallery
Sculptor John Chamberlain's reconfigured automobiles will be on view at the Pace Gallery, in Chelsea. Above, his work 'Smndtyrqurd,' from 2008.
Autos in Parts: 'Gondola Henry Miller,' from 1985, a work by Chamberlain that will be on view at Pace.
© John Chamberlain / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo by: Kerry Ryan McFate / Courtesy The Pace Gallery
Autos in Parts: 'Gondola Henry Miller,' from 1985, a work by Chamberlain that will be on view at Pace.

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About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

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