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This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook: April 7 - 13

Thursday, April 07, 2011 - 12:00 AM

WNYC

The artful civil rights photographs of Charles Moore, Romantic paintings of idealized European vistas, masterful drawings by Rembrandt and a rare gallery show that puts a spotlight on issues of social class. Oh, and did you know that there's an indie comic book show in town? There's no dearth of art to see in New York City in the coming week. Here's our guide to what's tops:

Rooms With a View: The Open Window in the 19th Century at the Metropolitan Museum of Art For all New Yorkers whose apartments offer views of little more than a brick wall, consider this the ultimate in window porn. Featuring roughly 40 artists, mostly from northern Europe, this exhibit of 19th century Romantic paintings is all about windows as idealized symbols of escape. You’ll be treated to views of Rome, Naples, Paris and Copenhagen, not to mention at least one German castle. Stare at any of these long enough and you’ll practically feel the fresh air rustling the drapes — just the sort of show to tide you over until spring decides to show up. Through July 4, in Manhattan.

Rembrandt and His School: Masterworks from the Frick and Lugt Collections at the Frick Collection When steel and railroad magnate Henry Clay Frick built his priceless collection of master works in the early 20th century, at its heart were numerous canvases by Rembrandt — and it is these works that anchor the Frick's current exhibit. While these paintings are no doubt an achievement, the real reason to head uptown is to see the dozens of drawings and etchings that normally reside at the Lugt Collection in Paris. These include Rembrandt's self-deprecating self portraits and tender domestic scenes -- a magnificent opportunity to see daily life through his eyes. In Manhattan, through May 15.

Charles Moore: Civil Rights and Beyond at Steven Kasher Gallery in Chelsea Protesters being pummeled by high pressure hoses in Birmingham. A young man with blood streaming down his face in Montgomery. Masked police officers emerging from a cloud of tear gas in Selma. Moore, a photojournalist who passed away last year, was one of the most iconic chroniclers of civil rights struggles. To celebrate his legacy, the Steven Kasher Gallery is organizing a comprehensive exhibition of his work featuring roughly 60 prints (most of them vintage), including photographs from other domestic and foreign assignments. Students of history: consider this a must-see. Through May 7, in Manhattan.

First Class/Second Class at Asya Geisberg Gallery in Chelsea If there’s a topic that the art industry generally likes to avoid, it’s the issue of class. To be fair, it’s a topic that we as a society have trouble with as well. So it’s refreshing to see the Asya Geisberg gallery tackle the issue head on by displaying works in which artists are, intentionally or not, depicting elements of social class in their work (such as Chris Verene’s crazy awesome photos of his family and friends). It’s a thought provoking exercise — even if the exhibit veers towards articulating extremes. Through May 7, in Manhattan.

PLUS: The Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art will be hosting its annual MoCCA Festival at the Lexington Armory this Saturday and Sunday. This is an incredible opportunity to geek out on a bounty of independently produced comics, graphic novels, animations, posters and prints. Expect plenty of related events, including appearances by the likes of noted artists such as Peter Kuper, Dash Shaw and Peter Bagge.

Photojournalist Charles Moore gets a comprehensive survey of his work at Steven Kasher Gallery. Above, the Birmingham Fire Department turns the high pressure hoses on civil rights protestors, 1963.
Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York
Photojournalist Charles Moore gets a comprehensive survey of his work at Steven Kasher Gallery. Above, the Birmingham Fire Department turns the high pressure hoses on civil rights protestors, 1963.
Moore braved violent, chaotic situations (and even arrest) to make his pictures. Shown here: an injured protestor, in Montgomery, 1965.
Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York
Moore braved violent, chaotic situations (and even arrest) to make his pictures. Shown here: an injured protestor, in Montgomery, 1965.
Where Have You Gone Joe DiMaggio: In addition to civil rights, Moore covered lighter topics, too — such as Joltin' Joe, lost in thought at spring training in Fort Lauderdale, 1963.
Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York
Where Have You Gone Joe DiMaggio: In addition to civil rights, Moore covered lighter topics, too — such as Joltin' Joe, lost in thought at spring training in Fort Lauderdale, 1963.
At the Frick Collection, an exhibit gathers the work of Rembrandt van Rijn. Above, 'The Polish Rider,' painted circa 1655.
The Frick Collection, New York
At the Frick Collection, an exhibit gathers the work of Rembrandt van Rijn. Above, 'The Polish Rider,' painted circa 1655.
Henry Clay Frick was a devotee of Rembrandt and, as a result, the museum's collection features various works by the artist — such as 'Self Portrait,' from 1658.
The Frick Collection, New York
Henry Clay Frick was a devotee of Rembrandt and, as a result, the museum's collection features various works by the artist — such as 'Self Portrait,' from 1658.
The exhibit at the Frick also contains delicate ink drawings on loan from the Lugt Collection in Paris — including 'Interior With Saskia in Bed,' drawn between 1640 and 1642.
Fondation Custodia, Collection Frits Lugt, Paris
The exhibit at the Frick also contains delicate ink drawings on loan from the Lugt Collection in Paris — including 'Interior With Saskia in Bed,' drawn between 1640 and 1642.
The Asya Geisberg Gallery currently has a group show exploring social class. Shown here, an image by Miles Ladin, from 1995: 'Nan Kempner at the International Fine Art & Antique Dealers Show.'
Courtesy the artist and Asya Geisberg Gallery
The Asya Geisberg Gallery currently has a group show exploring social class. Shown here, an image by Miles Ladin, from 1995: 'Nan Kempner at the International Fine Art & Antique Dealers Show.'
Also at Asya Geisberg: 'Travis's House,' a photograph by Chris Verene, who has spent years chronicling his friends and family in Galesburg, Illinois.
Courtesy the artist and Asya Geisberg Gallery
Also at Asya Geisberg: 'Travis's House,' a photograph by Chris Verene, who has spent years chronicling his friends and family in Galesburg, Illinois.
Getting the hair did: It is refreshing to see a gallery take on the often uncomfortable issue of class in a show. Shown here: Ruben Natal San-Miguel's 'Glamour Break Diva,' 2009.
Courtesy the artist and Asya Geisberg Gallery
Getting the hair did: It is refreshing to see a gallery take on the often uncomfortable issue of class in a show. Shown here: Ruben Natal San-Miguel's 'Glamour Break Diva,' 2009.
'View of Rome from the Artist's Room at the Villa Medici,' 1863, by Constant Moyaux, part of the open windows exhibit at the Met.
Musée des Beaux Arts, Valenciennes
'View of Rome from the Artist's Room at the Villa Medici,' 1863, by Constant Moyaux, part of the open windows exhibit at the Met.
In these idealized works, open windows offer the promise of romance and adventure. Above, Franz Ludwig Catel's 'A View of Naples through a Window,' from 1824.
The Cleveland Museum of Art, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Marlatt Fund
In these idealized works, open windows offer the promise of romance and adventure. Above, Franz Ludwig Catel's 'A View of Naples through a Window,' from 1824.

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Comments [1]

Shadeed Ahmad from New York City

It's a powerful statement and an immense form of due recognition to see "This Week: Must See Arts in the City" on the first page of WQXR's web page. Good job, WQXR. And congratulations, Lady Carolina Miranda.....

Apr. 09 2011 12:44 PM

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About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

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