Streams

Bloomberg's Low Approval Ratings Persist, New Poll Shows

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Mayor Michael Bloomberg's approval ratings are down — and New Yorkers appear especially unhappy with his direction of the city schools, a new poll shows.

Sixty-five percent of voters disapprove of how the mayor is handling the schools, according to a poll by New York 1 and Marist College taken last week.

The poll didn't ask voters if they want to get rid of the so-called last in, first out (LIFO) law that protects senior teachers from layoffs. But half thought Bloomberg's goal in pushing to get rid of the law is a maneuver to exert more control over the schools. Just about a third thought his goal is to close the budget deficit.

Fifty-six percent of city residents think teachers want to maintain LIFO just to protect seniority while only 35 percent believe it's to keep the most experienced teachers in classrooms.

Only 40 percent of registered voters approved of the mayor's overall job performance, according to the survey. That's virtually the same level as a poll by Quinnipiac University taken earlier this month, which found his approval rating at its lowest level in eight years

A total of 772 adults were surveyed by NY1-Marist, including 605 registered voters. The margin of error for the voters is plus or minus 4 percentage points.

Tags:

More in:

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Comments [1]

Pitt Cairn from Mohegan Lake

772 out of 8 million residents of the city? When these surveys get to over 10,000 persons, then you will have a meaningful representation of the city.

Apr. 01 2011 08:08 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Sponsored

Latest Newscast

 

 

Support

WNYC is supported by the Charles H. Revson Foundation: Because a great city needs an informed and engaged public

Feeds

Supported by