Streams

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Monday, March 28, 2011

Longtime foreign correspondent Kim Barker gives an account of what’s been called the “forgotten war” in Afghanistan and Pakistan, chronicling the years directly after America drove the Taliban from power. Best-selling author Alexander McCall Smith talks about the latest installment in his beloved No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party. Roger Rees and Tony Award-winning writer Rick Elice discuss “Peter and the Starcatcher,” a riff on the Peter Pan story. Plus, Tina Rosenberg explores the ways peer pressure can be a positive force.

Kim Barker's Taliban Shuffle

Longtime foreign correspondent Kim Barker gives an insider’s account of the war in Afghanistan and Pakistan since 2003, and captures the absurdities and tragedies of life in a war zone.  The Taliban Shuffle: Strange Days in Afghanistan and Pakistan talks about her evolution from an awkward newbie in Afghanistan to seasoned reporter with serious concerns about our ability to win hearts and minds in the region.

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Alexander McCall Smith on His No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency Series

Best-selling author Alexander McCall Smith talks about the latest installment in his beloved No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party. It tells of the latest adventures of Precious Ramotswe, Botswana’s No. 1 Lady Detective, and her assistant Grace Makutsi.

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Peter and the Starcatcher

Playwright Rick Elice and director Roger Rees talk about “Peter and the Starcatcher,” an imaginative new play based on the New York Times best-selling novel by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson: Peter and the Starcatchers.  In the play, a company of twelve actors plays some 50 characters on a journey to answer the century-old question: How did Peter become the boy who would not grow up? “Peter and the Starcatcher” has been extended through Sunday, April 17, at New York Theatre Workshop.

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How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World

Tina Rosenberg explains the positive force of peer pressure. Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World shows how peer pressure has reduced teen smoking in the United States, made villages in India healthier and more prosperous, helped minority students get top grades in college calculus, and even led to the fall of Slobodan Milosevic.

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Guest Picks: Roger Rees

What has Roger Rees been reading and listening to lately? Read more to find out.

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Guest Picks: Rick Elice

Playwright Rick Elise tells us about some of his favorite books and movies after a recent appearance on The Leonard Lopate Show.

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