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NYC Could Get 120 More Speed Cameras

Tuesday, April 01, 2014 - 03:44 PM

According to the NYC DOT, PS 81 in the Bronx has the highest levels of speeding in a school zone for the entire borough, with 96 percent of drivers going above the 30 mph posted limit. (Ricardo Hernandez)

Speed cameras for New York City streets may not have made it into the new state budget, but twin bills in the Assembly and Senate would bring them to the five boroughs, along with Nassau and Suffolk counties. A lot more of them: 120 new cameras for the city, as well as 56 for Nassau and 69 for Suffolk Counties.

Earlier versions of both the senate and governor’s budgets included proposals for more cameras, but they were stripped out of the budget passed late Monday.

Mayor Bill de Blasio called speed cameras "unfinished business." He, along with other city legislators, want more control over traffic enforcement.

Current law limits New York City to 20 speed cameras, although only a handful are currently operational.

The Assembly bill was introduced by Speaker Sheldon Silver, and has 25 co-sponsors. In the Senate, the matching bill's sole current sponsor is Sen. Jeff Klein of the Bronx, co-leader of the majority coalition in the Senate, along with Sen. Dean Skelos.

The broad scope of the bill, including not just New York City but Long Island, gives it a good shot at passage, said Assemblywoman Deborah Glick, one of the bill’s co-sponsors.

“I would assume that there is interest in both counties, and a mix of Democratic and Republican legislators in both houses. So I’m certainly optimistic that we can get this done,” Glick said.

Family members of people killed by cars are calling on legislators to take action, fast. “While our politicians dicker, New Yorkers are needlessly dying on our streets,” said Amy Cohen, founding member of Families for Safe Streets, in a statement. Cohen’s son Sammy was killed by a speeding driver on Prospect Park West. “The safety of our children, and of all New Yorkers, cannot be subject to political horse trading.”

While the Assembly could move on the bill as soon as next week, the Senate isn’t back in session until the 23rd.

In New York City, five of the city's 20 allowed cameras are currently operational. (No word yet from the NYC DOT on why.) The cameras have issued almost 13,309 tickets since January 16th. And that’s just in nine hours a day, five days a week — they are only permitted to issue tickets from 7 am to 4:10 pm, in and around school hours.

And that's a problem, say advocates. Almost 80 percent of people who are killed in speed-related crashes in New York State are killed at night or on the weekends, according to Juan Martinez, legislative director of Transportation Alternatives.

“In addition to expanding the number of school zones covered, we also have to be talking about expanding the number of hours that the cameras are on,” Martinez said. “We’re hoping that the legislature takes this opportunity to protect people all day long.”

 

 

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Comments [12]

New Yorker from New York City

The city should have home rule in regards to the number of traffic enforcement cameras and placement.

Apr. 10 2014 07:32 PM
What from NYC

"Please read this article from the Daily News, because it explains what I am talking about.

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/city-red-light-camera-revenue-sees-drop-records-show-article-1.1746237?comment=true"

From your own article:

"People have come to know where the locations of the cameras are and have modified their driving behavior in response,"

AKA, stopped running red lights.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/city-red-light-camera-revenue-sees-drop-records-show-article-1.1746237#ixzz2yQEYOFTt

"City officials countered that the cameras - and the multitude of decoys installed throughout the city - have increased safety and led to fewer fatalities. Intersections with red light cameras saw a 20% drop in all injuries to pedestrians, according to the Department of Transportation."

The cameras are obviously doing their job. Safety has improved at those intersections.

Apr. 09 2014 04:16 PM
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY

Please read this article from the Daily News, because it explains what I am talking about.

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/city-red-light-camera-revenue-sees-drop-records-show-article-1.1746237?comment=true

Apr. 08 2014 10:58 PM
What from NYC

"If the revenues from these cameras are down, then there aren't that many law breakers for this, which is bad for cities."

No. The purpose of camera enforcement is first and foremost to improve safety, not revenue. If revenues are down, then the cameras are working.

"The truth is that they want many to continue running red lights in order to make the revenue."

What? A driver that runs a red light (or speeds) is fined, not awarded.

"Some feel that telling where the cameras are located will only make them stop at the light rather than feel tempted to act in such a way. However, the chances of hiding the cameras are slim to none as that won't happen due to costs."

Speed cameras can be static, mobile or hidden. All 3 methods are commonly used. There is typically signage that will alert the driver that they are entering a camera enforcement zone.

"Again, safety is really secondary to this when revenue is primary."

No, it's not. If that were the case, they would be placed on highways and tuned to fine one MPH in excess the speed limit. The limits placed on these cameras is too forgiving.

"Also, the cameras don't alert the police to go after the person running the red light, it's just for getting the license plate number to send the ticket for that address and that's it."

That's all? What do you think happens when a police officer pulls someone over for running a red light? They are fined. The whole point is, unless you want to contribute your personal income to the City of NY, Don't speed or run reds. This technology helps with enforcement. In fact it has the potential to change the culture of driving in NYC. Much more significantly than human enforcement.

Apr. 08 2014 07:48 PM
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY

If the revenues from these cameras are down, then there aren't that many law breakers for this, which is bad for cities. The truth is that they want many to continue running red lights in order to make the revenue. Some feel that telling where the cameras are located will only make them stop at the light rather than feel tempted to act in such a way. However, the chances of hiding the cameras are slim to none as that won't happen due to costs. Again, safety is really secondary to this when revenue is primary. Also, the cameras don't alert the police to go after the person running the red light, it's just for getting the license plate number to send the ticket for that address and that's it.

Apr. 08 2014 01:40 PM
Fact Checker from NYC

In reality, speed cameras are just there for revenue purposes, not safety. There have been studies that have found that both speed and red light cameras didn't change anything when it came to accidents, just kept the same or got worse than before.

The above statement is false.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1963295/

"Conclusions. Speed cameras installed in an urban setting are effective in reducing the numbers of road collisions and, consequently, the numbers of injured people and vehicles involved in collisions."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1731028/

http://www.police.wa.gov.au/Traffic/CamerasCutCrashes/Camerasworkwhy/tabid/1761/Default.aspx

http://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/aboutthecentre/research/speedcameras/2013review.html

" All I see this is just another way to act lazy when it comes to enforcement."

The NYPD does not have the resources to reduce speeding effectively. Technology can assist in accomplishing that goal.

"I highly doubt that some of these same cameras will be going after pedestrians and cyclists that have been known for breaking laws as well"

These street users are not causing high incidents of serious injury or death.

Apr. 07 2014 08:56 PM
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY

In reality, speed cameras are just there for revenue purposes, not safety. There have been studies that have found that both speed and red light cameras didn't change anything when it came to accidents, just kept the same or got worse than before. All I see this is just another way to act lazy when it comes to enforcement. Also, I highly doubt that some of these same cameras will be going after pedestrians and cyclists that have been known for breaking laws as well, but they know that the cameras won't be aimed at them. I betcha, if there was a camera used for rogue cyclists and jaywalkers, a lot of money can be made from that as well.

Apr. 03 2014 01:52 PM
Alan

'TOM':
Most streets in this city are widely used by pedestrians and bicyclists in addition to drivers. Drivers have no right to unilaterally decide to travel at a dangerous speed to other road users, and they should be punished if they do so.

Apr. 02 2014 07:17 PM
Bronx from NYC

A step in the right direction but NYC requires many more speed enforcement cameras. If they blanketed the city, the vast majority people would not speed period.

With only 5 cameras in operation, only during school hours and limited to enforcement only in excess of 40 MPH; the city has already registered almost 12,000 speeding tickets.

Unacceptable behavior. The culture of reckless driving must stop in order to reduce traffic fatalities.

Apr. 02 2014 06:45 PM
TOM from Brooklyn

I've looked at the NYCDoT listing of school sites where everyone(100% on report)is 'speeding', driving above the posted 30 mph at all times on the road.

Shouldn't the NYCDoT review that current posted-limit and adjust it to the rate that is now "accepted" by all drivers, but limit it only when school is in session? Just a reality check.

Apr. 02 2014 03:34 PM
AMHess from Harlem

Almost every day I'm nearly killed by speeding drivers on 126th Street who swerve into the crosswalk at Park Avenue. Speed limit and red light cameras can't come fast enough.

Apr. 02 2014 10:15 AM
jlbklyn from Brooklyn

It's about time. You could install a camera at every busy intersection in the city and they would probably pay for themselves in a day– and that probably isn't even too much of an exaggeration.

Apr. 02 2014 10:07 AM

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