Four New York City Buildings Receive Landmark Status

Four very different buildings in New York City have received landmark status, including one that is now the city's youngest landmarked building.

The Japan Society building, completed in 1971, is a modernist, five-story structure in Turtle Bay. In its designation, the Landmarks Preservation Commission drew attention to the building's facade, which is "comprised of a series of elements considered to be a reinterpretation of familiar Japanese elements, such as layered, painted concrete spandrels, recessed windows, white ceiling panels and metal screens."

The commission also noted unique architecture on three other newly designated buildings: The "Renaissance Revival-style" Engineer's Club Building on West 40th Street, the "neo-Georgian-style" Neighborhood Playhouse on Grand Street and the "picturesque rural cottage style" Greyston Gatehouse on Independence Avenue in the Bronx.

Elisabeth de Bourbon, with the commission, said the landmark designation protects the buildings from demolition, and requires a permit for any major changes to the buildings' exterior.

Engineers' Club Building, 32 West 40th Street, between Fifth and Sixth avenues.

( Courtesy New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission )

The Neighborhood Playhouse (now the Harry DeJur Playhouse), 466 Grand Street, at the corner of Pitt Street.

( Courtesy New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission )

The William E. and Sarah T. Hoadley Dodge, Jr., Estate Gatehouse, 465 Independence Avenue, the Bronx.

( Courtesy New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission )

Japan Society Headquarters, 333 East 47th Street, between First and Second Avenues

( Courtesy New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission )
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