Streams

Tsunami Warnings

Friday, March 11, 2011

Gregory C. Beroza, professor & associate chair for Graduate Studies at the Earthquake Seismology Group at Stanford University, provides continuing coverage of the tsunamis generated by the earthquake off the coast of Japan.

Japan Earthquake and Tsunamis: Links, Videos, Resources

Guests:

Gregory C. Beroza

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Comments [9]

Kate Whitefield from Highland Park, NJ

I just had the most amazing experience this morning listening to WNYC's Brian Lerher show. I was hearing people calling in updates on cell phones from Japan, Hawaii etc. and realizing how close we are to everyone living on Mother Earth. We are truly a global village. Thank you Brian, your program brought us all so much closer together!!!! I am just overwhelmed by how much of an effect, and how broad a reach one radio program can have.

Mar. 11 2011 04:17 PM
jawbone

Correction: Link for Kevin Drum is actually for Steve Benen at Washington Monthly.

Link correct, my memory not.

Mar. 11 2011 12:57 PM
jawbone

Apologies -- I'd thought my comment hadn't taken or something.

Also, forgot HTML tags don't work here. Oops.

Mar. 11 2011 11:49 AM
jawbone

<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/11/tsunami-relief-gop-budget-cuts_n_834479.html">From HuffPo:

"Tucked into the House Republican continuing resolution are provisions cutting the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, including the National Weather Service, as well as humanitarian and foreign aid.

Presented as part of a larger deficit reduction package, each cut could be pitched as tough-choice, belt-tightening on behalf of the GOP. But advocates for protecting those funds pointed to the crisis in Japan as evidence that without the money, disaster preparedness and relief would suffer.

"These are very closely related," National Weather Service Employees Organization President Dan Sobien told The Huffington Post with respect to the budget cuts and the tsunami. <b>"The National Weather Service has the responsibility of warning about tsunami's also. It is true that there is no plan to not fund the tsunami buoys. Everyone knows you just can't do that. Still if those [House] cuts go through there will be furloughs at both of the tsunami warning centers that protect the whole country and, in fact, the whole world."</b>

The House full-year continuing resolution, which has not passed the Senate, would indeed make<b> steep cuts to several programs and functions that would serve in a response to natural disasters (not just tsunamis) home and abroad.</b> According to Sobien, the bill cuts $126 million from the budget of the NWS. Since, however, the cuts are being enacted over a six-month period (the length of the continuing resolution) as opposed to over the course of a full year, the effect would be roughly double.

As for NOAA, the House GOP cuts are even deeper. The House spending bill is roughly $450 million below the president's 2011 budget requests. The Senate Democratic bill would be $110 million below that request. The White House-allied Center for American Progress, argued that the House spending bill would actually cut $1.2 billion from the president's budget requests, likely by taking into account that the bill does not provide NOAA the funding increase requested for the Joint Polar Satellite System."

<a href="http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2011_03/028397.php">Kevin Drum has more on this. Apparently, Yglesias tweeted about this and was criticized for bringing this up...when there was such a terrible example of why tsunami warning is a good idea!

Gotta hand it to the Repubs -- they have no shame.

Mar. 11 2011 11:48 AM
jawbone

<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/11/tsunami-relief-gop-budget-cuts_n_834479.html">From HuffPo:

<blockquote>Tucked into the House Republican continuing resolution are provisions cutting the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, including the National Weather Service, as well as humanitarian and foreign aid.

Presented as part of a larger deficit reduction package, each cut could be pitched as tough-choice, belt-tightening on behalf of the GOP. But advocates for protecting those funds pointed to the crisis in Japan as evidence that without the money, disaster preparedness and relief would suffer.

"These are very closely related," National Weather Service Employees Organization President Dan Sobien told The Huffington Post with respect to the budget cuts and the tsunami. <b>"The National Weather Service has the responsibility of warning about tsunami's also. It is true that there is no plan to not fund the tsunami buoys. Everyone knows you just can't do that. Still if those [House] cuts go through there will be furloughs at both of the tsunami warning centers that protect the whole country and, in fact, the whole world."</b>

The House full-year continuing resolution, which has not passed the Senate, would indeed make<b> steep cuts to several programs and functions that would serve in a response to natural disasters (not just tsunamis) home and abroad.</b> According to Sobien, the bill cuts $126 million from the budget of the NWS. Since, however, the cuts are being enacted over a six-month period (the length of the continuing resolution) as opposed to over the course of a full year, the effect would be roughly double.

As for NOAA, the House GOP cuts are even deeper. The House spending bill is roughly $450 million below the president's 2011 budget requests. The Senate Democratic bill would be $110 million below that request. The White House-allied Center for American Progress, argued that the House spending bill would actually cut $1.2 billion from the president's budget requests, likely by taking into account that the bill does not provide NOAA the funding increase requested for the Joint Polar Satellite System.</blockquote>

<a href="http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2011_03/028397.php">Kevin Drum has more on this. Apparently, Yglesias tweeted about this and was criticized for bringing this up...when there was such a terrible example of why tsunami warning is a good idea!

Mar. 11 2011 11:46 AM
Hide from New York

My parents are in Japan, my mom is in Chiba pref. and my dad is on the road, driving back from Fukushima pref. (Northeast). My dad apparently stuck in traffic for the past few hours trying to get back to Chiba. Luckily, at the house, there were only few bowls that fell off the china cabinet and shattered. My mom is completely scared, and waiting for my dad to return. I am heading back to Japan on Wednesday, so I guess there are some clean up to do.

Mar. 11 2011 11:41 AM
chierubi from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico (Normally living in the GrVillage

As soon as I heard about the earthquake, I sent out e-mail messages to my family and friends, mostly in the Osaka and Tokyo areas. Thankfully for me, everyone I contacted wrote me back, saying that he/she was all right. Obviously, the ones in Tokyo all said that this was the biggest and scariest earthquake they ever experienced.

My baby brother, who works for the Osaka Metropolitan Police as an auto mechanic, has been quickly sent out to one of the devastated areas, presumably to assist the police and/or Self-Defence Force's operations.

I am currently in Mexico, with my husband, and have been watching NHK broadcast since last night. Unbelievable scenes are shown... Just unbelievable.

Mar. 11 2011 11:35 AM
Naoko from Osaka from Osaka, Japan

Safe in Osaka, just cannot believe what's happening here... feel so sad.

Mar. 11 2011 11:32 AM
Joe Farrar from Tokyo

I'm here in Tokyo now. The mass transit system has been disrupted and cell phone communications are spotty at best, but there is not much noticeable physical damage. Still pretty scary though.

Mar. 11 2011 11:27 AM

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