Streams

Art in New York City

Friday, March 11, 2011

Art critics Ken Johnson, Irving Sandler, and Amei Wallach discuss the current state of visual art in New York City. They'll talk about this year's Armory Show and what it says for the future of New York's status as one of the art capitals of the world.

Guests:

Ken Johnson, Irving Sandler and Amei Wallach

Comments [23]

some artist are primarily allured to the superficiality of the "art": fame, fortune, acclaim. but few people are artisit in the passionate sense. I truly believe that becasue of the business of "art" and its network based, some of the better Art is not seen and exhibited

Mar. 11 2011 02:32 PM
Calls'em... from Here, there...

Correction:

I meant to say: "UNTALENTED" bores....

Mar. 11 2011 02:12 PM
Calls'em As I Sees'em from Here, there & everywhere.

Artists are born, not made. Most new art stinks. Most art always stunk. People tried their hand and most failed. We can't compare the great mass of mass produced artists stamped out by the educational industrial process, with the relative handful of successful artists from the past. When you combine the sense of entitlement that most people under 30 have, with the pretensions of being an "artist" you create an insufferable bore or group of mostly talented bores known as today’s artists.

PS - Did I really hear one of your guests say that no art comes from "Tea Baggers?" I thought that throughout history a huge % of "artists" were "tea baggers?" Funny that he should attack his own.

That segment was another example of why NPR shows are losing individual contributors, let alone government support.

Mar. 11 2011 02:01 PM
Lynne from New Jersey

Leonard,

This was a good start. Now please do more art spots like this and instead of just going on about how women artists don't get equal opportunity, give them some exposure! Let's face it, they make some of the art around. I know it's a business but the art world powers that be have to let go of their antiquated attitudes about women artists. It's the 21st century for heavens sake! I'm just saying...

Mar. 11 2011 01:45 PM
tom from astoria

Nick from UWS - Great comment. Ellen from Brooklyn - awesome! Drawing is the great foundation for visual art. (Not all -- we can't be dogmatic about it) Personally, it's my hope for the future; and I think art world will benefit in the long run from a good dose of the discipline and craft that is so sorely lacking -- which the 'critics' did not address. Contemporary art lives in the recent past -they cannot see the true contemporaries that are creating the future of art -- until they achieve some success and are widely exposed.
Tom Barlow

Mar. 11 2011 01:17 PM
tom from astoria

Nick from UWS - Great comment. Ellen from Brooklyn - awesome! Drawing is the great foundation for visual art. (Not all -- we can't be dogmatic about it) Personally, it's my hope for the future; and I think art world will benefit in the long run from a good dose of the discipline and craft that is so sorely lacking -- which the 'critics' did not address. Contemporary art lives in the recent past -they cannot see the true contemporaries that are creating the future of art -- until they achieve some success and are widely exposed.
Tom Barlow

Mar. 11 2011 01:15 PM
Jose from Queens

Ken Johnson is awesome. I always liked his writing. Now I like him, period!

Leonard, don't be such a squeamish little mouse. I don't think the Teabaggers are particularly worried about your show anyway.

Mar. 11 2011 01:08 PM
oscar from ny

The real antichrist or the ancient serpent called the devil disgisues himself as an artist..he is a fourrth degree mason and comes from the order of the jinn..and he has come to deciwve the people of the world with his magic arts...be awareeee

Mar. 11 2011 01:07 PM
Felicia from Brooklyn

This conversation angers me because it's equating, on a certain level all art making is trying to be subversive or for profit.

And there are artists like Banksy who are political, smart, and not just chasing after the $$.

I hate conversations about art....so myopic. As if what's shown in galleries and museums is representative of "good" art making

Mar. 11 2011 12:58 PM
Nick from UWS

What's shocking about today's art is its complete disconnection from simple human emotion. 90% of what you look at generates no feeling whatsoever; indeed you find yourself wondering what the hell this artist is on about. Disconnection from reality and nature in art completely murders it.

Mar. 11 2011 12:56 PM
j from brooklyn

All this misses the point that being a "successful" artist that ignores the market is only possible for the privileged -- and there are then gradations from those points of privilege. Getting an MFA?!? Who the hell can afford that -- and THEN enter into working yourself to the bone in order to get nowhere. What to do? What to do?

Mar. 11 2011 12:55 PM
anonyme

Amen! Art school is a great way to learn how to think and solve problems - it's not vocational school. I miss having my mind and heart enlarged by artists - so much gimmickry. I've moved on, given up, mostly. My favorite contemporary NY artist is Kyle Staver.

Mar. 11 2011 12:54 PM
tom from astoria

Big changes are coming to the art world! It's very exciting. The constant breaking down of form and conceptualism is old and dated. The building up of a new tradition is long over-do.

Mar. 11 2011 12:53 PM
Laura Galbraith

I wish NY was more accepting of Lowbrow art the way California has been.

Mar. 11 2011 12:53 PM
L from NY

Congratulations to Aimee Wallach for her correct characterization of the art market vis a vis Women artists.

Mar. 11 2011 12:49 PM
Estelle from Austin

I wonder if the guests have any comments about Jerry Jones' Cowboy Stadium, and the roles of different kinds of art patrons...both today and historically.

Mar. 11 2011 12:49 PM
ellen from Brooklyn

it seems that art today documents political issues, almost -if not-, in a journalistic way and it is accepted. it seems these artists are more literal than abstract/ more interpretive type artists, why is that? often this mindset, to me, seems more appropriate for activists, etc…

it almost seems that it becomes a substitute for skills/craft.. perhaps? someone please comment further on this idea, as it was barely touched upon...

Mar. 11 2011 12:44 PM
Mike from Tribeca

One of the most talented young artists in the show is Michael Palladino, who I've known since before he was born. Please buy his paintings. I may need to hit him up for a loan after I retire.

Mar. 11 2011 12:42 PM

You have to be able to sell your art in order to support yourself. This is not the 70's where you can find a cheap place in a crappy neighbourhood and produce. Now your studio space is costing big bucks. Yes, "professionalized"--that's the word!

Mar. 11 2011 12:40 PM
Nick from UWS

I truly hate all that fluffy, foggy, let's-all-hold-hands Kumbaya blurring of definitions that is consistently used as a cover and avoidance of true artistic vision and skill. Drawing is drawing. Pick up a pencil or pen and let's see what you got. If you can't, well maybe you're not an artist, at least not in drawing. Drawing is not dance or video or music or anything else people who can't draw claim it is.

Mar. 11 2011 12:39 PM
Jay Jay from LES

Thing I noticed about this year.
No free ticket. I could not find free tickets which was so easy to get them previous years. Fair organizers wanted to make money from addition badly this year.

Mar. 11 2011 12:37 PM
Estelle from Austin

What do 201 and 202 signify?

Mar. 11 2011 12:32 PM
tom from astoria

As an artist looking at the Armory Show I found two trends all over the place: A real attention to the surface -- and a desire combine 3-D with 2-D: objects coming off the picture plane or poking through (Enrico Castellani, Mel Bochner)... a carving into the the surface, or cut-outs, sparkles even movement in animated pices in a frame--anything to jump off the 2-D surface. Also, a return to depiction in painting --

Mar. 11 2011 12:27 PM

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