Streams

Picasso's Guitars

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Anne Umland, curator at the Museum of Modern Art, discusses the exhibition “Picasso: Guitars 1912-1914.” It brings together two guitars Picasso created—one out of cardboard, paper, string, and wire, the other out of sheet metal—and some 70 collages, constructions, drawings, mixed-media paintings, and photographs.

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Violin Hanging on the Wall. Possibly begun Sorgues, summer 1912, completed Paris, early 1913

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Oil, spackle with sand, enamel, and charcoal on canvas
25 9/16 x 18 1/8" (65 x 46 cm)
Kunstmuseum Bern. Hermann and Margrit Rupf Foundation

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Installation in the artist´s studio at 242, boulevard Raspail. Paris, December 9, 1912, or later

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Gelatin silver print
3 3/8 x 4 1/2" (8.6 x 11.5 cm)
Private collection

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Guitar, Gas Jet, and Bottle. Paris, early 1913 Oil, charcoal, tinted varnish, and grit on canvas

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Oil, charcoal, tinted varnish, and grit on canvas
27 11/16 x 21 3/4" (70.4 x 55.3 cm)
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. Purchased 1982

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Siphon, Glass, Newspaper, and Violin. Paris, December 3, 1912, or later

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Cut-and-pasted newspaper, hand-painted faux bois paper, and paper, and charcoal on paper
18 1/2 x 24 5/8" (47 x 62.5 cm)
Moderna Museet, Stockholm

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Bottle, Guitar, and Pipe. Paris, autumn 1912

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Oil, enamel, sand, and charcoal on canvas
23 5/8 x 28 3/4" (60 x 73 cm)
Museum Folkwang, Essen. 
Acquired in 1964 with the support of the State of North-Rhine Westphalia and Eugen-und-Agnes-Waldthausen-Platzhoff-Museums-Stiftung

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Guitar. Céret, March 31, 1913, or later

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Cut-and-pasted newspaper, wallpaper, paper, ink, chalk, charcoal, and pencil on colored paper
26 1/8 x 19 1/2" (66.4 x 49.6 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Nelson A. Rockefeller Bequest

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Guitar. Paris, October-December 1912

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Paperboard, paper, string, and painted wire
25 3/4 x 13 x 7 1/2" (65.1 x 33 x 19 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Guitar. Paris, after mid-January 1914

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Ferrous sheet metal and wire
30 1/2 x 13 3/4 x 7 5/8" (77.5 x 35 x 19.3 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist

© 2011 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Guitar. Paris, December 1912 or later

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Charcoal on paper
18 1/2 x 24 3/8" (47 x 61.9 cm) 
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Donald B. Marron

Guests:

Anne Umland

Comments [3]

tom from astoria

Why can't the curators ever take questions on this show? Ironically, the common items Cubists used emphasized the everyday nature of art in real life. The great unifying experience of art in a public place like MoMA is that ordinary people -- not just experts! -- can together enjoy and comment on the work. It's the refreshing viewpoints of ordinary people that give the experience real life. a newspaper, a glass of beer. Curators tend to drain the experience of this element.

Feb. 24 2011 12:56 PM
Lothar Brieger from Greenwich Village

Ms. Umland started to tell an interesting story of how the exhibit came to be (involving an Art historian noticing something) and Leonard uncharacteristically interrupted her. Can she finish the story?

Feb. 24 2011 12:55 PM
Richard Johnston from Manhattan upper west side

Even the host lapses into the pretentious, confusing historical present tense sometimes.

Feb. 24 2011 12:54 PM

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