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Lessons from History

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Martin Redrado, the former President of Argentina’s Central Bank, discusses the dangers of mixing political and economic power in an emerging country. Then, T. C. Boyle talks about his latest novel, When the Killing’s Done. Also, we’ll take a look at how Harlem, once a Dutch village, became the capital of Black America. Plus, we’ll find out how an author’s quest to reconstruct the lives of her own 19th-century ancestors shed light on the forgotten roles of African-American elites in New York City.

Argentina's Central Bank, the Economic Crisis, and Power

Martin Redrado, president of Argentina’s Central Bank from 2004 to 2010, looks into the dangers of mixing political power and economics in an emerging country. No Reserve: The Limit of Absolute Power is an account of his appointment by Argentina’s President, Nestor Kirchner, to lead Argentina through difficult economic times. He explains emerging world markets, tenets of central banking, and how governments can cause—and avoid—financial crises.

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T. C. Boyle on His Novel When the Killing’s Done

T. C. Boyle talks about his latest novel, When the Killing’s Done: an adventure about endangered animals and those who protect them. Mainly set on the wild and sparsely inhabited Channel Islands off the coast of Santa Barbara, the story looks at the power that humans try to exert, for better or worse, over the natural world.

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Harlem: The Four Hundred Year History

Historian Jonathan Gill discusses the history of Harlem: one of the most iconic neighborhoods in the United States. Harlem: The Four Hundred Year History from Dutch Village to Capital of Black America is the first complete chronicle of this remarkable place: from Henry Hudson's first encounter with natives there, to the Harlem Renaissance, to the modern day.

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A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth-Century New York

Carla L. Peterson tells the history of African-American elites in New York City, and of her nineteenth-century ancestors and the world they lived in. Black Gotham: A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth-Century New York City challenges many of the accepted ideas about African-American history, slavery, freedom, racism, and the cosmopolitan black elite.

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Guest Picks: T. C. Boyle

T. C. Boyle stopped by The Leonard Lopate Show to talk about his new novel, and told us about what he is reading and listening to.

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