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This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook: February 17 - 23, 2011

Thursday, February 17, 2011 - 12:00 AM

WNYC

Tipis in Brooklyn, wry illustrations in Chelsea, drawings inspired by photography in SoHo and cartoons that poke fun at the art world at John Jay. Herewith, our guide to what's cooking in the arts world of big ol' New York City:

Tipi: Heritage of the Great Plains, at the Brooklyn Museum In what promises to be a good source of inspiration to architecture buffs, the Brooklyn Museum has organized an exhibit that will look at the tipi and its central role in Plains culture. In addition to featuring an array of objects and artifacts (including a rare tipi liner from the late 19th century and some absolutely sumptuous clothing), the exhibit will include various tipis, historic and contemporary. Among them: a 25-foot tall tipi erected by Blackfoot artist Lyle J. Heavy Runner, in collaboration with Naomi Crawford, which visitors will be able to enter. (If you’re curious to see how a tipi comes together, the museum has a helpful blog post here.) In a related event, this Friday at 2 P.M., northern Arapaho architect Dennis Sun Rhodes will discuss the tipi as architectural inspiration. Opens Friday, in Brooklyn.

Drawn from Photography, at the Drawing Center, in SoHo This exhibit brings together 13 artists from around the world who use the photograph as a source of meticulous inspiration. From Emily Prince, who creates revolving installations consisting of drawings of war dead to Fernando Bryce, who redraws important historical documents, the images show artists deliberately inserting a human hand into the technology of the camera. Opens Thursday at 6 P.M., in Manhattan.

Marcel Dzama, Behind Every Curtain, at David Zwirner Gallery This Canada-born, Brooklyn-based artist is known for creating ink and watercolor paintings that depict fantastical worlds where figures both human and animal (and sometimes a combination of the two) always seem to engage in all manner of cryptic activities. (Chances are you’ve seen his work: he did the cover art for Beck’s album Güero.) The new show at Zwirner will feature a series inspired by the game of chess, along with the debut of a related film by the artist. (See a teaser here.) Opens Thursday at 6 P.M., in Manhattan. The gallery will also host a book signing with Dzama on Saturday, March 5, at 4 P.M.

Pablo Helguera: But enough about me—now let’s talk about my work, at John Jay College President’s Gallery For years, this New York-based artist has taken on the ridiculosities of the art industry in his whimsical “artoons” — single-frame comics that poke fun at art conferences, art theory, art fairs, and, naturally, Jeff Koons. For artsy insiders, think of it as a good opportunity for a chuckle. Through March 19, in Manhattan.

Bonus: This Friday is a good time to wander around Bushwick's art spaces, since a number of these will be staying open late (until 10 P.M.) for a combined art walk/bar crawl.

Click on the slideshow below to see images of what the NYC arts world has to offer this week.

At the Drawing Center: Art inspired by photography. In this image, a watercolor by Frank Selby titled 'Light Blue Riot,' from 2010.
Courtesy of the artist and Museum 52
At the Drawing Center: Art inspired by photography. In this image, a watercolor by Frank Selby titled 'Light Blue Riot,' from 2010.
Also in the show: Drawings by Emily Prince that depict U.S. servicemen who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan. Above, a portrait of Wilfred Flores Jr., who died in 2007.
Courtesy of the artist and Kent Fine Arts.
Also in the show: Drawings by Emily Prince that depict U.S. servicemen who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan. Above, a portrait of Wilfred Flores Jr., who died in 2007.
Pablo Helguera's 'Artoons' skewer art industry craziness. A collection of these works is now on display at John Jay College.
Courtesy Pablo Helguera
Pablo Helguera's 'Artoons' skewer art industry craziness. A collection of these works is now on display at John Jay College.
Another Helguera cartoon, in which he appears to be quoting my pithy cocktail party small talk.
Courtesy Pablo Helguera
Another Helguera cartoon, in which he appears to be quoting my pithy cocktail party small talk.
Opening today at David Zwirner Gallery in Chelsea: The chess-inspired works of the Brooklyn-based Marcel Dzama. Above, his 2010 mixed-media piece, 'The Revolution's been defeated, before you begin.'
Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner Gallery
Opening today at David Zwirner Gallery in Chelsea: The chess-inspired works of the Brooklyn-based Marcel Dzama. Above, his 2010 mixed-media piece, 'The Revolution's been defeated, before you begin.'
The Brooklyn Museum has erected a Blackfoot tipi in its galleries as part of its exhibition on the tipi and Plains cultures. This one was created by Lyle J. Heavy Runner and Naomi Crawford.
Courtesy Brooklyn Museum
The Brooklyn Museum has erected a Blackfoot tipi in its galleries as part of its exhibition on the tipi and Plains cultures. This one was created by Lyle J. Heavy Runner and Naomi Crawford.
Also at the Brooklyn Museum: A painted elk hide robe by Shoshone artist Cadzi Cody (Cosiogo), circa 1900, depicts tipis, buffalo and people.
Brooklyn Museum, Dick S. Ramsay Fund
Also at the Brooklyn Museum: A painted elk hide robe by Shoshone artist Cadzi Cody (Cosiogo), circa 1900, depicts tipis, buffalo and people.
A woman's dress produced by an unknown Sioux artisan between 1875 and 1900.
Brooklyn Museum, Charles Stewart Smith Memorial Fund
A woman's dress produced by an unknown Sioux artisan between 1875 and 1900.
Artist Harvey Pratt. A tipi liner he created in 2009 is part of the Brooklyn Museum exhibit.
Courtesy of Harvey Pratt
Artist Harvey Pratt. A tipi liner he created in 2009 is part of the Brooklyn Museum exhibit.
Pratt's Tipi Liner made of canvas, arcylic paint, textile paint, beads and metal studs. Pratt is a Cheyenne Chief and Police Forensic.
Courtesy Brooklyn Museum
Pratt's Tipi Liner is made of canvas, arcylic paint, textile paint, beads and metal studs. Pratt is a Cheyenne Chief and Police Forensic.
A detail from a North Dakota tipi liner at the Brooklyn Museum from 1889. The liners keep tipis warm.
Courtesy Brooklyn Museum
A detail from a North Dakota tipi liner at the Brooklyn Museum from 1889. The liners keep tipis warm.

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Comments [1]

shadeed ahmad from New York City

It's nice to see Native American tee pees and culture in general making a stylish and beautiful return to New York City via The Brooklyn Museum exhibit "Tipi: Heritage of the Great Plains."

Feb. 21 2011 11:13 AM

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About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

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