Streams

The Last Shah of Iran

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Abbas Milani discusses Mohammad-Reza Shah Pahlevi, the last Shah of Iran, who shaped Iran’s modern age and the contemporary politics of the Middle East, and gives an account Iran’s turn from politically moderate monarchy to totalitarian Islamic republic. His biography The Shah is an account of the man full of contradictions, who made Iran a global power, and how U.S. and Iranian relations have reached the point where they are today.

Guests:

Abbas Milani
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Comments [5]

Behnaz from USA

British did not force Staline to withdraw from Iran, it was USA that gave deadline to Stalin and at then end it was Ghavamsaltaneh who went to Moscow and pretend he is agree to have contract for the Gas to give Russia, and that was the time Staline took his troop out. But when Ghavamsaltaneh went back to Iran, he resigned, so the parliament did not have to accept the contract. Those people were true patriotics.

Mar. 21 2011 06:01 PM
arya oveyssi

THE LAST RULER OF THE PERSIAN PLATUE WOULD NEVER BE A SUBJECT FOR DISCUTION,THERE IS NOT EVEN ONE SINGLE NUTRAL AND NOT CONNECTED PERSON WHICH WOULD TALK FREELY AND TRUTHFULY...SO LEAVE THAT IMMORTAL ALONE.

Feb. 12 2011 12:48 PM
Amy from Manhattan

Mr. Milani's statement that Shia is closer to Zoroastrianism than to Islam (or maybe he said to Sunni Islam) is very interesting. Could he say more about how & why this is so, or at least where to find out more about this?

Feb. 10 2011 12:26 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

Did not the British force Stalin to withdraw his forces from northern Iran in 1946?

Feb. 10 2011 12:21 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

Did not the British force Stalin to withdraw his forces from northern Iran in 1946?

Feb. 10 2011 12:21 PM

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