Streams

Radio Shangri-La

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Lisa Napoli talks about moving to Bhutan: a deeply spiritual place whose citizens are believed to be among the most content in the world. Radio Shangri-La: What I Learned in Bhutan, the Happiest Kingdom on Earth is an account of how she created a new community for herself and helped to start Bhutan’s first youth-oriented radio station: Kuzoo FM.

Guests:

Lisa Napoli

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Comments [8]

Sally Strom from New York

Lisa Napoli gave short shrift to the Bhutanese government's policy of ethnic cleansing. This government, calling itself "democratic," decreed that all living in Bhutan must have the culture of the rulers. Therefore, people whose ancestors came to Bhutan in the late 19th century from Nepal, were thrown out through the brutal harassment similar to the Serbs treatment of Moslems in the Balkans. These peaceful people, from very old to just born,walked on foot mostly at night to avoid attack, to an uninhabited spot in Nepal where, from the early 1990s to about 2009, they've lived in refugee camps.
The United States has agreed to accept 60,000 of the refugees, the remaining 40,000 has been accepted by a handful of other western nations.
It was disappointing to hear Bhutan described in tourist book style on NPR. Did I hear Lisa Napoli say she was "moved" to see people obey the King by standing in line to vote?
thrown out.

Feb. 13 2011 10:14 AM
Marisa Volino from New York

Lisa Napoli gave the wrong information regarding
Buhtanese religious practice. The Tibetans
and Buhtanese are both practitioners of Mahayana
Budhism. She said she believed that the people
in Bhutan practiced Mahayana Budhism which
is different from what the Tibetans practiced.

Feb. 10 2011 08:20 PM
Marisa Volino from New York

Lisa Napoli gave the wrong information regarding
Buhtanese religious practice. The Tibetans
and Buhtanese are both practitioners of Mahayana
Budhism. She said she believed that the people
in Bhutan practiced Mahayana Budhism which
is different from what the Tibetans practiced.

Feb. 10 2011 08:19 PM
Lisa Napoli from the internet

Through the magic of the Internet, my friend Noa Jones listened to the interview from Thimphu and kindly points out that I made two errors in my chat with Leonard. Bhutanese practice Vajrayana Buddhism; also, Bhutanese are not food self-sufficient. What I meant to say is that Bhutanese are subsistence farmers.

Feb. 09 2011 10:28 AM
Sonam Ongmo from New York

@Jake. If you want to know about the Gay and Lesbian situation in Bhutan you can read this article

http://www.sonamongmo7.com/2010/07/gay-and-lesbian-pride_11.html

Feb. 08 2011 01:49 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

People are people everywhere. When people are totally free to do what they want, they will all act more or less the same. As for happiness, one rabbinical sage long ago said, "Who is happy? He who is content with his share in life."

Those who do not look to the left or right, or up or down, or back or ahead, but are just content with themselves and their lot in life as it comes are the consistently happy ones.

Feb. 08 2011 01:00 PM
tom from nyc

You can meet Bhutanese selling magnets and tin signs in our NYC Parks. There is a constants stream of Butanese who are given table, items to sell, cart and storage to sell in Central Park, Uninion square, Battery Park. I don't know who sets them up, but they're pretty competitive -- getting the best locations!

Feb. 08 2011 12:54 PM
Jake from Astoria

Can you ask her about the life and treatment of gay, lesbian and transgender folks in Bhutan?

Feb. 08 2011 12:45 PM

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