New York Historical Society Set to Update Look

The New York Historical Society is hoping to make history itself.

The Upper West Side mainstay will temporarily close its doors Wednesday so the museum can undergo major renovations that will span nine months as part of a three year, $65 million project. 

The museum will reopen on November 11 with a children's museum, library, new restaurant and more spacious Great Hall. The Historical Society will also unveil a new permanent exhibit that traces American history from Colonial times to September 11, 2001.

Fifth-grade students from P.S. 3 in Manhattan were invited by the museum to mark the temporary closing. The kids packed a time capsule that will be placed into the wall of the museum with personal essays, drawings and photos.

Correction: This story originally stated the project cost $6.5 million. It in fact costs $65 million.

The New York Historical Society’s face-lift is already underway. When it re-opens on November 11, it will include a new children’s museum and library, a restaurant and new permanent exhibit.
The New York Historical Society’s face-lift is already underway. When it re-opens on November 11, it will include a new children’s museum and library, a restaurant and new permanent exhibit. ( Katherine McGee/WNYC )
Three years ago, P.S. 3 in Manhattan found a time capsule in the walls of their school from 1914. They donated it to the historical society.
Three years ago, P.S. 3 in Manhattan found a time capsule in the walls of their school from 1914. They donated it to the historical society. ( Katherine McGee/WNYC )
The Museum invited the fifth graders at P.S. 3 to participate in a new time capsule. Here, the students display their work one last time before it goes in the time capsule.
The Museum invited the fifth graders at P.S. 3 to participate in a new time capsule. Here, the students display their work one last time before it goes in the time capsule. ( Katherine McGee/WNYC )
Many students drew pictures of themselves or major events in their lifetime. Here, one student draws their interpretation of September 11.
Many students drew pictures of themselves or major events in their lifetime. Here, one student draws their interpretation of September 11. ( Katherine McGee/WNYC )
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