Streams

Have You Been Witness To Revolution?

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Be sure to listen to our "Witness to Revolution" call-in from the Brian Lehrer Show Friday. Audio above!

As pro-democracy movements spread throughout the Arab world, we want to check in with those who have previously walked down the path towards revolution (and, yes, we know that term is loaded. See our primer.) Whether you were there or have simply heard stories from family and loved ones, share your story of revolution by filling out the survey below - or just read the submissions. We'll follow up on air and online all week. 

Your life experiences and knowledge add richness to our reporting. If you’re interested in becoming a news source for other WNYC stories, join the Public Insight Network, a group of people from all walks of life that help inform our news coverage by lending their unique insights. Sign up here»» 

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Comments [8]

AF

Nothing happens when you click the see results link - wtf!

Feb. 08 2011 07:21 PM
It's A Free Country

Sheila-
There is a drop-down menu below the question you quoted. You can select your revolution from that list, or of course click "other". Thanks for visiting the page.

Feb. 08 2011 11:20 AM
SHEILA from Staten Island, NY

There is no list of revolutions as promised on this page.
"...We've included below a list of notable recent revolutions.If you have a personal connection to one, please select it. If you have a connection to another revolution - or an almost revolution (USA 1960s anyone?) please select "other..."

Feb. 08 2011 08:53 AM
Eugenia Renskoff from Brooklyn, NY

Hi, Brian, I have seen what is going on (or something quite similar) in Argentina, where I was born. There was looting of supermarkets in the late 80s and an uprising with people taking to the streets. Then, in 2001 6 or 7 presidents in a very short period of time. All this was to no avail. Now Cristina Kirchner is in power. The crime rate in Argentina is very high and so is the inflation. Not very many people in the US pay attention to Argentina. It’s got stiff competition from other places in the world. Eugenia Renskoff

Feb. 04 2011 01:11 PM
Leah from Manhattan

I hope you reach out to Bela for the upcoming event. He phoned in today and spoke very articulately, sharing an extraordinary level of detail, and I gathered from his report that he participated actively during the uprising in Hungary in 1956 -- i.e., that he did not just live through it. (I don't mean to denigrate the experience of those who witnessed revolution as kids, but that's clearly a different thing.)

Another reason I'd urge you to reach out to Bela is that he represents an older generation. There are principles and practices of revolution that change with social and technological advances, and then there are those that endure. Let's see what has endured -- taking advantage of the oldest 1st-person accounts we can!

Feb. 04 2011 12:07 PM

step one free press

Feb. 04 2011 11:42 AM
Caroline Schimmel from Greenwich, CT

Don't forget Portugal in 1974!

Feb. 04 2011 11:39 AM
chava from Manhattan

Those of us who marched in the anti-war movement can claim to have "deposed" a leader. Lyndon Johnson did declare that he would not run again (sound familiar?). For a while, the protests worked. As to what happened after that, some of us feel that a kind of fundamentalism captured the United States.

Feb. 04 2011 11:39 AM

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