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The Buddhist Influence (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, January 21, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds program, listen to Buddhist-inspired music, including new music from the elusive composer Anton Batagov who has  put out a recording of his music featuring chants by the leading Tibetan Buddhist spiritual leader of the Kalmykia people. We’ll also hear selections from the Steve Tibbetts collaboration with the Tibetan Buddhist nun, Chöying Drolma - “Chö.” Then there’s the sounds of traditional Tibetan Buddhist instruments in music from David Parsons. Plus, music from Philip Glass’s soundtrack to the movie Kundun (about the young Dalai Lama coming of age and escaping Tibet with his life, during the time frame of 1937 to 1959.)

PROGRAM #2988, The Buddhist Influence (First aired on Thurs. 10-01-09)

ARTIST(S)

RECORDING

CUT(S)

SOURCE

Philip Glass

Philip On Film – Filmworks by Philip Glass

Escape to India (from Kundun), excerpt

Nonesuch 79660 (5 CD set) www.nonesuch.com

Anton Batagov & Telo Tulku Rinpoche

Bodhicharyavatara

Adopting the Spirit of Awakening (3rd chapter) [9:52]

Tummo 9017
www.batagov.com
www.savetibet.ru
www.buddhisminkalmykia

Steve Tibbetts & Choying Drolma

Chö

Chö Chendren [3:38]

Hannibal 1404
Out of print, but try Amazon.com*

Philip Glass

Philip On Film – Filmworks by Philip Glass

Escape to India (from Kundun) [10:09]

Nonesuch 79660 (5 CD set) www.nonesuch.com

Steve Tibbetts & Choying Drolma

Chö

Kangyi Tengi [6:30]

See above.

David Parsons

In Retrospect 1980-2003

Maitreya, excerpt [7:00]

Celestial Harmonies 14204 www.harmonies.com

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The most cutting-edge, worldly-wise music show on the airwaves returns with nearly bi-weekly installments available for download.  For more than three decades, host John Schaefer has been exploring more genres of music than you knew existed.  A truly compelling hour of radio, and now you can tune in wherever you are, whenever you want. As if you weren’t dependent enough on your MP3 player…

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