Streams

In Too Deep

Monday, January 10, 2011

Journalist Stanley Reed, who has covered BP for over a decade, and investigative reporter Alison Fitzgerald discuss disasters at the oil company BP—from last year's blowout in the Gulf of Mexico to previous oil spills and explosions—and look at what the future might hold for the oil company. Their book In Too Deep: BP and the Drilling Race That Took it Down is an account of the company and the problems that have plagued it.

Guests:

Alison Fitzgerald and Stanley Reed

Comments [8]

Steve Z from Westchester

Nothing happening in Alaska now and in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 should be a surprise to anyone, and BP 's responses to these problems deserve little credibility. BP's lack of diligence and attention to corrosion problems on the Alaska pipeline, along with shortcuts and lapses in maintenance measures to prevent them, have been ongoing and well documented.

It seems clear that if penalties and oversight are not made a far more important part of their decision-making they will continue their corporate culture of irresponsibility in these areas and our environment, health and safety will suffer accordingly. They will continue to use political contributions and lobbying efforts as a way to keep the government relatively lenient in treating their abuses that allow them to go on measuring their profits without taking into account the true cost of their operations.

Jan. 10 2011 01:35 PM
Amy from Manhattan

"Time will tell" if BP's new head is serious about changing the co's. culture? We can't afford to wait around & see what time will tell--what can be done to make sure he keeps that commitment? Can their operations be moderated by a disinterested party, either governmental or organizational?

Jan. 10 2011 12:42 PM
Ben

Yes BP's the largest holder in Aleyska and was back during the Valdez disaster. Alaska's oil is BP's oil.

Jan. 10 2011 12:38 PM
Joel from Westchester

Realizing that my comment is "old news:" The U.S. was cozy with BP over 50 years ago (1953) when the company asked the CIA to help it out. Mossadegh, then the democratically-elected socialist leader of Iran wanted to nationalize its oil fields. The CIA responded by aiding in the assassination of Mr. Mossadegh.

Jan. 10 2011 12:25 PM
Joel from Westchester

Realizing that my comment is "old news:" The U.S. was cozy with BP over 50 years ago (1953) when the company asked the CIA to help it out. Mossadegh, then the democratically-elected socialist leader of Iran wanted to nationalize its oil fields. The CIA responded by aiding in the assassination of Mr. Mossadegh.

Jan. 10 2011 12:24 PM
Joel from Westchester

Realizing that my comment is "old news:" The U.S. was cozy with BP over 50 years ago (1953) when the company asked the CIA to help it out. Mossadegh, then the democratically-elected socialist leader of Iran wanted to nationalize its oil fields. The CIA responded by aiding in the assassination of Mr. Mossadegh.

Jan. 10 2011 12:24 PM
Ben

What about BP's involvement in the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster? Greg Palast details it very thoroughly in his book "The Best Money Democracy Can Buy" but no one seems to mention that BP's involvement in this disaster.

Jan. 10 2011 12:18 PM

If you take a look, you will find that the industry/regulatory problem is pervasive throughout this country. In virtually every industry sector, the regulated industry's attorney and lobbyests write the regulations... this has been the case since the 1870s. And in light of a GOP/Tea Party intent on cutting the budgets, things will only get worse.

Jan. 10 2011 12:17 PM

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