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Conservation and Conversation

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Friday, December 31, 2010

We're playing some favorite recent interviews for today's show. John and Patricia Adams talk about founding the Natural Resource Defense Council. Then, Dick Cavett discusses his life in the host’s seat. And Steve Martin talks about art, writing, and his latest novel. Plus, New Yorker writer David Owen tells why New York is the greenest and most efficient community in the country.

Happy New Year!

Founding the Natural Resources Defense Council

John H. Adams and his wife Patricia Adams talk about founding the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and the organizations mission to protect the environment. Their memoir A Force for Nature: The Story of NRDC and Its Fight to Save Our Planet, gives an account of the NRDC’s founding in 1970, and its evolution from a small grassroots environmental advocacy group to an international powerhouse with 1.2 million members.

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Dick Cavett

Legendary talk show host Dick Cavett, host of The Dick Cavett Show, which aired on ABC from 1968 to 1975 and on PBS from 1977 to 1982, discusses the great figures he has known and shares his thoughts on culture and politics today. In Talk Show: Confrontations, Pointed Commentary, and Off-Screen Secrets, he tells his best tales and he recounts great moments with the legendary entertainers who crossed his path.

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Steve Martin on An Object of Beauty

Legendary writer, actor, and performer Steve Martin talks about his long and varied career, his many talents, and his latest novel. An Object of Beauty tells the story of an ambitious woman climbing through New York’s social and art world.

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Green Metropolis

David Owen explains why cities like New York are the greenest communities in the United States. People who live in urban centers consume less oil, electricity, and water, live in smaller spaces, throw away less trash, and spend far less time in automobiles than other Americans. Green Metropolis: Why Living Smaller, Living Closer, and Driving Less are the Keys to Sustainability looks at why suburban sprawl may seem green, but it actually increases environmental damage. Owen looks at how to make cities more like the countryside, and how to make other settled places more like Manhattan.

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