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The Atlantic Ocean

Monday, January 03, 2011

Simon Winchester gives an account of the history, geography, science, and cultural influence of the Atlantic Ocean.  Atlantic: The Biography of an Ocean tells the story of this great body of water and it’s connection to the Vikings, the Irish, the Chinese, Christopher Columbus, the Portuguese and Spanish.

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Simon Winchester
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Comments [6]

wwriter from East Village


From the blurb on your website. Note that "it's connection" should be "its connection." Come on, guys, you're supposed to be the smart radio station.

The Atlantic Ocean

Simon Winchester gives an account of the history, geography, science, and cultural influence of the Atlantic Ocean. Atlantic: The Biography of an Ocean tells the story of this great body of water and it’s connection to the Vikings, the Irish, the Chinese, Christopher Columbus, the Portuguese and Spanish.

Jan. 04 2011 01:58 PM
wwriter from East Village


From the blurb on your website. Note that "it's connection" should be "its connection." Come on, guys, you're supposed to be the smart radio station.

The Atlantic Ocean

Simon Winchester gives an account of the history, geography, science, and cultural influence of the Atlantic Ocean. Atlantic: The Biography of an Ocean tells the story of this great body of water and it’s connection to the Vikings, the Irish, the Chinese, Christopher Columbus, the Portuguese and Spanish.

Jan. 04 2011 01:57 PM
Amy from Manhattan

Does the book address the trans-Atlantic slave trade?

Jan. 03 2011 01:23 PM
Connie from NJ

Please do come back and talk about 'I Know Where I'm Going'--that's my favorite movie too; it's quite wonderful.

Jan. 03 2011 01:22 PM
Tom from NJ

Any take on the North American 'Red Paint people' who traded to Europe before all others..? Any information? What about more modern evidence about Chinese or earlier 'eastern' societies which seem to have crossed the Pacific before the ice age?

Jan. 03 2011 01:21 PM
Joseph from Brooklyn

The acidification of the ocean caused by rising Co2 levels is much more destructive to the world than the rising water levels caused by ice melting, but acidification is mostly ignored compared to "global warming".

Jan. 03 2011 01:13 PM

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