Streams

Staying Positive

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Friday, December 31, 2010

Today's show is a best-of, so we won't be taking any calls. But the comments page is always open!

So many believe in the power of positive thinking. Not writer Barbara Ehrenreich. She discusses why positive thinking can be bad for you. Plus: author Salman Rushdie on his new young adult novel; tennis great Andre Agassi on his love-hate relationship with the sport; Douglas Rushkoff on surviving in an overly digital world; and why 40% of Americans think marriage is obsolete.

Going Negative

Barbara Ehrenreich, journalist, activist and author of Nickel and Dimed and Bright-Sided: How Positive Thinking is Undermining America, discusses the current mood in the country and what she sees as an unwarranted obsession with optimism.

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Program or Be Programmed

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An American in China

Deborah Fallows, author of Dreaming in Chinese: Mandarin Lessons In Life, Love, And Language, writes about the cultural differences she encountered living in China.

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Wasted

Jonathan BloomWasted Food blogger and the author of American Wasteland: How America Throws Away Nearly Half of Its Food (and What We Can Do About It) talks about why half of America's food goes uneaten and what consumers can do to cut waste.

What are your tips for cutting down on food waste?  Comment on our show page.

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Salman Rushdie: Luka and the Fire of Life

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Who's Getting Married

Belinda Luscombe, Time magazine senior editor, talks about the results of the recent Time/Pew survey on marriage that show opinions sharply divided by age and class.

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Andre Agassi: Net Effects

Tennis star Andre Agassi discusses life, tennis, his education philanthropy and his bestselling book now out in paperback, Open: An Autobiography.

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2010 News Montage

The WNYC newsroom's year-end review of the biggest stories of 2010 in New York City and beyond.

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