Streams

Open Phones: The Biggest Science Stories of 2010

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Listeners: You voted and science it is. Yesterday, we asked you to vote on what industry you'd like to hear about and science won. Scientists: give us a call and tell us what the biggest news was in the world of science in 2010. 

Comments [15]

Ed from Larchmont

In Switzerland or Germany recently a man was apparently cured of AIDS. He had leukemia and AIDS, and in 2007 received bone marrow cells from a donor whose immune system was very resistant to AIDS. The adult stem cells in the bone marrow cells rebuilt his immune system, and about two weeks ago the doctors claimed they didn't see any sign of AIDS in him. Why isn't this story getting more visibility?

Dec. 28 2010 12:42 PM
Kiradira from Ridgewood/Bushwick

I've been trying to report my unplowed street to 311 online but the website keeps saying it can't take complaints due to "technical difficulties". Our subway is out too Ltrain Halsey. You can't call 311 either.

Dec. 28 2010 12:01 PM
Mason from Jackson Heights

My question is: why should the discussion be had w/elderly patients and not ALL patients. Young folks die too...just in case you forgot this fact of life.

Dec. 28 2010 10:41 AM
Marielle Anzelone from PS Brooklyn

As an urban conservation biologist - in NYC's nature no less - the connection between human health and biodiversity. As biodiversity declines, disease flourishes: http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/12/02/as-biodiversity-declines-disease-flourishes/ Also - - nature's healing effects boots immunity - http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/06/health/06real.html?_r=3

Dec. 28 2010 10:34 AM
a g from n j

science, can only be as good and wise, as the peope appyling, it, no wiser. we have to deal with political interface. and, we have to deal with ecologic variants,which entail chaos theory variables,that will take a lot more, than any singular technology[however good], can solve.

Dec. 28 2010 10:29 AM
xtina from E. Village

Science is concepts and discovering previously unknown things about the universe.

Medical technology is not science.

Dec. 28 2010 10:26 AM
Joe from Charleston, SC

I've really loved this recent report: A recent report of a bacterium in Mono Lake, California utilizing arsenic in place of phosphorous for its basic molecules of life, namely DNA and proteins. Forget whole-genome sequencing--to ponder and investigate the implications of this report of life based on a slight chemical shift in what we have understood to be the fundamental molecules of life on Earth. Wow, what fun!

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/2010/12/01/science.1197258

Dec. 28 2010 10:25 AM
Elaine from Bronx

Thank you for this topic...i love it

Dec. 28 2010 10:21 AM
Russell Burke from Long island

the new Neanderthal DNA data and the new DNA data from the Denisovan Homo in Siberia looks like it will re-write a big piece of our recent history.

Dec. 28 2010 10:19 AM
sally from NYC

Y'know, as an historian of technology and science, I find this question a little disturbing in its assumption that all great developments will be immediately understood as such.

I'm also a little disturbed at the idea of "science" as a single, unified "industry": isn't it a practice or rather, a set of practices?

Dec. 28 2010 10:18 AM
a g from n j

"science", is the last thing, i want you, to talk about. NPR [america] in general, talk about science, as if it were, distinct from the the pressure, and market contingencies of wall st. you talk about science, as an ivory tower gold standard, that emanates from reductivist logic. a cultic newtonian conceit, that does not allow for a holistic integrated view of the world. "science", does not exist in a vaccuum, seperate and apart from the rest of the world. this is part of the reason, we don't look at the worlds problems, with a fresh perspective.

Dec. 28 2010 10:18 AM
sally from NYC

Y'know, as an historian of technology and science, I find this question a little disturbing in its assumption that all great developments will be immediately understood as such.

I'm also a little disturbed at the idea of "science" as a single, unified "industry": isn't it a practice or rather, a set of practices?

Dec. 28 2010 10:18 AM
Graham Walker from Bronx

Whywasn't Engineering an option : ^ ( Anyway, here is the biggest issue of 2010 (documented on 12/23/2010 on the BBC): New solar fuel machine 'mimics plant life' http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12051167

Dec. 28 2010 10:15 AM
Yosif from Manhattan

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/changing-roi-to-drive-a-ten-fold-increase-in-wind-solar-power-in-mobile-telecom-96792419.html

Dec. 28 2010 10:15 AM
Yosif from Manhattan

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20107439

I like this direct conversion of skin to neurons. So cool! You skip the skin conversion to pluripotent stem cells (which Yamanaka describe in 2008 - Nobel pending) and directly trans-differentiate skin to neurons. Unforntunately it is not very 'scalable' to convert skin to neurons, because the process is very ineffecient but I think this was cool in concept. Skin to neurons!

I also remember a 10 fold increase study in solar panels but I study stem cells and neurons so I'm biased here.

Dec. 28 2010 10:13 AM

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