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Backstory: What the WikiLeaks Documents Reveal about Corruption Around the World

Thursday, December 23, 2010

The revelations contained in the State Department cables that were published by WikiLeaks have captured headlines for the last few weeks. On today’s Backstory, Elizabeth Dickinson, Assistant Managing Editor for Foreign Policy, explains what the WikiLeaks cables have revealed about government corruption around the world—and how the United States has responded.

Guests:

Elizabeth Dickinson
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Comments [3]

Richard Johnston from Manahttan upper west side

What I'm thinking, you know, is it is fervently to be sort of hoped that this woman's written communication is sort of, you know, more articulate than her spoken, as it were.

Dec. 23 2010 01:33 PM
Henry Otaola from Elizabeth NJ

Does your guest has any comment of what was found on Honduras..?

...and our role...

...again u_u.

Dec. 23 2010 01:28 PM

i have loved reading wikileaks.

i have written a few blog posts on them.

Is Israel the next Mexico speaks about corruption in places of mideast and the -stans.
http://tednellen.blogspot.com/2010/12/is-isreal-next-mexico.html

an early blog:
Hip Hip Horray Wikileaks:
http://tednellen.blogspot.com/2010/12/hip-hip-horray-wikileaks.html

the writing is fun and demonstrates the skills of our diplomats as good writers and great observers.

I have chosen to follow embassies some days or writers.

this is the most exciting thing to come from washington since the watergate hearings.

i just hope "they" stop harassing julian assange.

ted

Dec. 23 2010 01:07 PM

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