Streams

The Quest to End Malaria

Monday, December 06, 2010

Bill Shore tells the story of the scientists determined to develop a vaccine for malaria, a feat most tropical disease experts have long considered impossible. In The Imaginations of Unreasonable Men: Inspiration, Vision, and Purpose in the Quest to End Malaria, he looks at the character and moral fiber of people who devote their lives to solving the world’s most pressing and difficult problems, and examines what drives them to persist in their work.

Guests:

Bill Shore

Comments [4]

nomannyc

As other previously ill-perceived creatures that feed on people, such as leeches and maggots, were found to be useful in restoring health, can mosquitoes also be of purposeful medical use?
Can non-malaria-carrying mosquitoes be used to spread the things our bodies need, such as the immunogens or the potential vaccine, in the same way that other mosquitoes have spread parasites and bacteria?
How about having larvae and pupi grow and develop in water instilled with these things we need so that they may grow into mosquitoes doctors can use to spread it to patients in a controlled method?
As for malaria-carrying mosquitos, is it possible to inject or feed them what is needed to combat the parasite?
This was a very informative piece and I look forward to hearing a response.

Dec. 07 2010 08:30 PM
nomannyc

As other previously ill-perceived creatures that feed on people, such as leeches and maggots, were found to be useful in restoring health, can mosquitoes also be of purposeful medical use?
Can non-malaria-carrying mosquitoes be used to spread the things our bodies need, such as the immunogens or the potential vaccine, in the same way that other mosquitoes have spread parasites and bacteria?
How about having larvae and pupi grow and develop in water instilled with these things we need so that they may grow into mosquitoes doctors can use to spread it to patients in a controlled method?
As for malaria-carrying mosquitos, is it possible to inject or feed them what is needed to combat the parasite?
This was a very informative piece and I look forward to hearing a response.

Dec. 07 2010 08:29 PM
Amy from Manhattan

To Steve: if the vaccine wears off, people can be given booster shots.

To Bill Shore, you compared the return of malaria to that of TB. But TB came back primarily because the Reagan adminstration refused to deal w/AIDS, & AIDS patients w/impaired immune systems got TB in large numbers, providing a base for the TB pathogen to expand from into the general population. It did also develop strains resistant to the drugs used at that time, but I don't think they'd have spread to the same extent if they hadn't gotten a foothold among untreated AIDS patients.

Dec. 06 2010 01:06 PM
Steve from Brooklyn, NY

How do you know that the malaria vaccine will not interfere with the accumulation of natural immunity through standard exposure? What if babies who would get the vaccine simply postpone morbidity and mortality until the vaccine wears off around 5-10 years?

Dec. 06 2010 12:45 PM

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