Streams

We All Have Issues

Thursday, November 25, 2010

New York Times and New York Times Magazine contributing writer Judith Warner argues that the assumption that kids are over-diagnosed and over-medicalized for mental health disorders is potentially very destructive. She discusses her new book We've Got Issues: Children and Parents in the Age of Medication.

Guests:

Judith Warner

Comments [5]

anna from new york

Jennifer is absolutely right.
It was a joyful day when Ms. Warner left the NYT. I was among those who danced happily. I couldn't stand constant idiotic psycho-babbling of an overfed, over privileged and, frankly, primitive "lady."

Nov. 25 2010 04:01 PM
Jennifer

http://www.scatteredminds.com/about.htm

Nonsense! Judith Warner bloviates and is not an expert in anything. Too many people are turning to medication because we don't want to take on the far more challenging task of changing mothers and fathers work lives and children's home/neighborhood environments. Society does not cause all the issues we see, but it definitely shapes some.

Nov. 25 2010 03:28 PM
Jennifer

http://www.scatteredminds.com/about.htm

Nonsense! Judith Warner bloviates and is not an expert in anything. Too many people are turning to medication because we don't want to take on the far more challenging task of changing mothers and fathers work lives and children's home/neighborhood environments. Society does not cause all the issues we see, but it definitely shapes some.

Nov. 25 2010 03:03 PM
Kelly from somerset nj

We have a 6 year old son with PDD-NOS (mild autism) who has severe violent tantrums on a fairly regular basis. (I have many scratches and bruises on my body as well as broken glasses and even a broken bed). We recently learned that the state of NJ has a service open to anyone with a child with behavioral health issues which can be accessed through www.performcarenj.org. You can contact them 24 hours a day and they can initiate services which are paid for by the state. Depending on the severity of the issues, they can follow children for a few months or a few years. We feel very relieved that our son will be getting a case manager who can pull together all the different people involved with him (teachers, afterschool staff, physicians, OTs, PTs) and put together a unified approach to dealing with his behavior. So far, that does not include medication, but if it becomes necessary, that will also be included.

Nov. 25 2010 11:56 AM
Corinne Goodman from Brooklyn, NY

I think the caller with the son with ADD is absolutely a cautionary tale. As the mother of a son who was diagnosed with more labels than I can count and who is a teacher of young and older children, I think the culture of our society is to turn to psychiatric drugs for the answer to almost everything. My husband and I resisted the outrageous and completely overwhelming pressure to drug our son. After two different public schools and a private special ed school, we wound up taking him out of school, and homeschooling him for 4 1/2 years and then helping found a new school for him. (The Brooklyn Free School.) He's now flourishing in his second year of college, and anyone who met him now would never know the hell he and we went through for about 11 years.

Our son would never have healed if he had been on psychiatric medications. We've watched his friends and other kids who were medicated not do well over and over again. The anti-anxiety drugs make it very difficult to keep your memory, and the anti-psychotic drugs make it very difficult to process information. Most "cocktails" have one of each plus an anti-depressant. All of the schools our son went to wanted him on these drugs and put VERY heavy pressure on us to do so.

I think that part of the current epidemic of kids like our son is due to environmental factors - we just don't know whether it was genetically modified foods, air, water or other pollution. We turned our son's life around not with a regular doctor or psychiatrist, who also thought the answer was psychiatric drugs, but with acupuncture, nutrition, cranio-sacral therapy, crozats (aago.com) and love, understanding and patience, as difficult as that was.

Nov. 25 2010 11:55 AM

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

Get the WNYC Morning Brief in your inbox.
We'll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.