Streams

Infinity of Nations at the National Museum of the American Indian

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Cecile Ganteaume, curator of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian will discuss the New York branch’s exhibition Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian, a permanent exhibition of some 700 works of Native art from throughout North, Central, and South America that shows the breadth of the museum's renowned collection and highlights the historic importance of many of these objects.

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Ancestral Pueblo stone jar

Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

ca. A.D. 1000 

Sandstone, pigment

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Moccasins associated with Peo Peo T'olikt (Bird Alighting, Nimi'ipuu, b.?–1935)

Idaho 

ca. 1880 

Deer hide, glass beads, cotton thread

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Mebêngôkre krokrokti (feather headdress or cape)

Brazil

ca. 1990

Macaw feathers, heron feathers, cotton cordage

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Wedding dress associated with Inshata-Theumba (Susette La Flesche or Bright Eyes, Omaha, 1854–1903)

Nebraska

ca. 1881

Wool

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Mariano Flores Cananga (1949) Carved gourd.

Ayacucho, Peru

ca. 1925

Gourd, pigment

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Angokwakzhuk (Happy Jack, Iñupiaq, 1870?–1918)

Carving

Nome, Alaska

ca. 1900

Walrus ivory tusk

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Casas Grandes effigy jar

Paquimé, Chihuahua, Mexico

A.D. 1200–1450

Clay, paint

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Gikaml (headdress) associated with Hiłamis (Willie Seaweed or Smoky Top, 'Nak'waxda'xw Kwakwaka'wakw, 1873–1967)

Vancouver Island, British Columbia

ca. 1949

Cedar wood, paint, velveteen

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Maya bas-relief depicting a ball player

La Corona, Petén Department, Guatemala

A.D. 600–750

Limestone

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Moche–Huarí tunic

Possibly Campanario,

A.D. 700–900

Wool, cotton, dye

 

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Juana Basilia Sitmelelene (Chumash, 1782– 1838). Basket

San Buenaventura Mission, California

ca. 1815–1822

Sumac, juncus textalis, mud dye

Zia Pueblo, New Mexico

ca. 1920–1929

Clay, paint

Courtesy of the National Museum of the American Indian
Rosalia Medina Toribio (Zia, 1858–1950) Polychrome jar

Zia Pueblo, New Mexico

ca. 1920–1929

Clay, paint

Guests:

Cecile Ganteaume

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