Streams

New Releases, February 2011 (Weekly Podcast)

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

WNYC

It's that time again for the monthly program of new releases. John Schaefer picks through the boatloads of CDs that have flooded his inbox to find new releases worthy of showcasing in tonight's program. We'll hear from the new double-release by Todd Reynolds, "Outerborough," a collection of both his own works and pieces written for him by other folks.  Also, hopefully we will sample music from Corsican singers performing Tibetan music and Brooklyn-based Balkan brass band music.

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Collaborative Efforts (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, March 18, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we'll take a sneak peak at the forthcoming "Tirtha," a collaboration between the South Indian guitarist Prasanna   and pianist/composer Vijay Iyer.  Also, the venerable sax titan Charles Lloyd together with MacArthur “genius grant”-winning pianist Jason Moran, from a live performance on Soundcheck.  And more.

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Lost Music (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, March 11, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds Program, we’ll listen to intriguing music about being lost, both physically, and in the sense of just having no direction, and not knowing where you’re headed.  From duoJalal -violist Kathryn Lockwood and percussionist Yousif Sheronick- hear music by Kenji Bunch, an entire suite called “Lost & Found.”

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Modern Oratorios & Sacred Texts (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, March 04, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, hear some modern oratorios and other sacred texts set to music, including Kitty Brazelton's "Ecclesiastes: A Modern Oratorio," Phil Kline's "John the Revelator," and Douglas J. Cuomo's "Arjuna's Dilemma." Composer, professor, singer, improviser, multi-instrumentalist and bandleader Kitty Brazelton has written a modern oratorio with texts  from the Book of Ecclesiastes, re-translated from the Hebrew and Latin by Brazelton herself.  Her discoveries and deeper readings have uncovered a message that she believes Christians concealed in the 17th century; "live now—your life, whatever it is, is the gift—be grateful for everything, hardship or reward because you can’t understand where they will lead."

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New Music for Solo Guitar (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, February 25, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we’ll have at least a double-helping of guitar music, featuring some solo works by Marc Ribot intended as music for films: some are adaptations of music he has actually written for films, others for classic silent movies that he scored for his personal amusement, still others for films of his own imagination.  These haunting and wistful pieces explore, as Ribot says, "the strange area between language and spatiality that exists partly in between music and visual image, and partly as a common property of both."

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Indie Rock Branches Out (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, February 18, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, listen to indie artists straddle the divide between world music, ambient and electronica as they incorporate or approximate traditional instruments, traditional sounds, and take the results well out of indie rock-land.  We'll hear from the Tradi-Mods Vs Rockers record, the latest in the Congotronics series, where carefully chosen artists have recorded homages to the original source material - landing someplace between reinventions and cover versions, and often go as far as being worthy of the dancefloor. 

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Electronically Enhanced Acoustica (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, February 04, 2011

WNYC

Hear works for acoustic instruments and electronics, with the combinations of piano and electronics, violin and electronics, or a small ensemble using no electronics at all on this New Sounds program.  We'll listen to Open Graves with Stuart Dempster recorded way down in a water cistern, which sounds very processed, although it was all acoustic.

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New Releases, December 2010 (Weekly Podcast)

Monday, January 31, 2011

WNYC

It's the most wonderful time of the month!  John Schaefer sifts through the steady stream of CDs that have flooded his office to find a sampling of new releases worthy of showcasing in tonight's New Sounds program.  From here we can see some acoustic Afro-pop, a heaping helping of Balkan-inspired jazz, Balkan-informed indie rock, and the Sway Machinery, featuring Khaira Arby.  Plus, new music from Stephan Micus, and much more.

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The Buddhist Influence (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, January 21, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds program, listen to Buddhist-inspired music, including new music from the elusive composer Anton Batagov who has  put out a recording of his music featuring chants by the leading Tibetan Buddhist spiritual leader of the Kalmykia people. We’ll also hear selections from the Steve Tibbetts collaboration with the Tibetan Buddhist nun, Chöying Drolma - “Chö.” Then there’s the sounds of traditional Tibetan Buddhist instruments in music from David Parsons. Plus, music from Philip Glass’s soundtrack to the movie Kundun (about the young Dalai Lama coming of age and escaping Tibet with his life, during the time frame of 1937 to 1959.)

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New Piano-Based Music (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, December 17, 2010

WNYC

New music from the Neil Cowley Trio and the Bad Plus are on this New Sounds program, bands which on the surface resemble conventional piano trios, but pull liberally from the rock world and everywhere else.  We'll listen to both of their most recent releases, along with music from Rachel's, who also have a recent release.  Even though they are no longer together, this recording is of previously unavailable material.  All that, and more...

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Requiem for Fossil Fuels Live (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, December 10, 2010

WNYC

“Requiem for Fossil Fuels,” a site-specific memorial mass, combines human voices and ambient sound.  It’s the result of more than twenty years of work and collaboration by Bruce Odland and Sam Auinger, two sound artists/composers and sonic thinkers.  For this edition of New Sounds, listen to the performance, recorded live at the World Financial Center last month.

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American Tales (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, December 03, 2010

WNYC

Listen to some American tales on this New Sounds program.  We’ll hear the mesmerizing 11-minute reflection, “Another Day In America” as delivered through Fenway Bergamot, Laurie Anderson's wise and witty “Voice of Authority” alter-ego and more of her musical and lyrical medititations on America in the 21st century, from her recent "Homeland."  Also, Jerry Granelli’s “Twenty Questions for an Outlaw” uses the persona of Billy the Kid, and is something like an “audio movie or play,” with text by actor/playwright/singer Rinde Eckert.  We’ll hear their blend of ambient jazz and spoken word, and much more.

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Cinematic Audio (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, November 19, 2010

WNYC

American sound-designer, film editor and composer, Matteo Marchisano-Adamo makes cinematic audio sculptures out of prepared piano and electronics from a collection of “Inventions.” We'll also hear electronic music based on the sounds of Indonesian gamelan by Gregory Taylor, and some rooted in sounds from Jamaica as well. That, and more on this New Sounds.

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With Ben Neill and Mimi Goese (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, November 12, 2010

WNYC

For this New Sounds, mutant trumpter/composer Ben Neill joins John Schaefer in the studio.  Lately, he’s been working together with filmmaker Bill Morrison and singer Mimi Goese on a staging of the Persephone myth – Demeter’s daughter taken by Hades to the underworld against her will.  The multimedia music theatre work, which will be staged at BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music) next week, is informed by rock, layered with electronica and silent film projections, and is reimagined as a 19th century theatre troupe’s "antidote to irony."  We’ll hear songs from Persephone and catch up with Ben Neill.

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With Steven Mackey (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, November 05, 2010

WNYC

Electric guitarist, composer and Princeton University professor Steven Mackey returns to New Sounds for this program.  His enormous and ambitious work, “Dreamhouse,” a collaboration with singer/producer/writer Rinde Eckert and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, for orchestra, electric guitars, and singers has just been released.

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New Sounds Special Podcast: O+A -Requiem for Fossil Fuels (Mini-Preview)

Tuesday, November 02, 2010

WNYC

"Requiem for Fossil Fuels," is a new setting by Bruce Odland and Sam Auinger of the traditional mass.  Performed by a quartet of vocal virtuosi with the composers at the helm of an 8-channel “Orchestra of Cities,” this piece is driven by the clamorous sounds of the metropolis (site-specific recordings): traffic, construction, alarms, chatter as well as sounds of helicopters, jets and harbor sourced outside the Winter Garden in 2004 when O+A presented their sonic installation, Blue Moon, on the Plaza. 

 

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Narration in Music (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, October 29, 2010

WNYC

For this New Sounds, listen to the found sounds of narration from strange and wonderful recordings in music by the Books.  We'll hear from their latest, "The Way Out," a playful and surreal effort recorded in the Books' home studios.

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Music From the North (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, October 22, 2010

WNYC

Hear some Icelandic electronic chamber music with a delicate undercurrent of minimalism from the young Olafur Arnalds on this New Sounds.  We’ll listen to the Arnalds record, "And they have escaped the weight of darkness."  The rest of this Northern edition of the show includes music from Norway and Sweden, and more from Iceland.

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Unusual Collaborations (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, October 15, 2010

WNYC

On this New Sounds program, hear music from Iraqi oud master Rahim AlHaj, in collaboration with accordion virtuoso Guy Klucevsek, from a fascinating double album of cross-cultural collaborations, called “Little Earth.”  AlHaj studied with Munir Bashir, but was also trained in Western classical music, and on this global effort was joined by folks as diverse as Cape Verde’s Maria de Barros, Bill Frisell, Peter Buck, and Mali’s Yacouba Sissoko.

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The New Latin Tinge (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, October 08, 2010

WNYC

Jelly Roll Morton identified “the Latin tinge” as a major component in the development of jazz.  Now, the rhythms and sounds of Latin music can be heard in the long-awaited Malian-Cuban collaboration that was meant to take place when the Buena Vista Social Club was born – “AfroCubism.”

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