Streams

Downtown, Then and Now

Monday, October 10, 2011

WNYC

Take a dip into minimal hypnotic music with something from composer/professor (theory and history of sound!) Anthony Moore and composer/artist Alexis Georgopoulos, who goes by “Arp.”  Moore was formerly a member of weird pop band Slapp Happy, and has also studied Indian classical music with Viram Jasani.  Georgopoulos used to be a member of California percussion ramble band Tussle and has written a few film scores and works for dance.  Together, these two punks have crafted a collection of tunes recalling the Penguin Café Orchestra stuck in a Möbius strip, with two for Englishman Robert Wyatt called “Wild Grass I & II.”

 

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New Releases, June 2011 (special podcast)

Monday, September 26, 2011

WNYC

It's that time of the month again for the new releases show on New Sounds. John Schaefer carefully sorts through the stacks, bins, and boatloads of new CDs which have come across his desk over the past month to present some of the finest new releases.

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Responsorium 9/11

Sunday, September 11, 2011

WNYC

Listen to Pulitzer-prize winning John Adams’ - “On the Transmigration of Souls,” written for the first anniversary of the attacks.  Then there's Michael Gordon’s “The Sad Park,” made from the electronically manipulated voices of children who witnessed the World Trade Center attack, and premiered in September of 2006.  Plus, an excerpt from Robert Moran’s brand-new “Trinity Requiem,” featuring the Trinity Youth Chorus.   

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Unintended Elegy

Saturday, September 10, 2011

WNYC

For this podcast edition of the program, listen to some of William Basinski's "Disintegration Loops." Finished in September of 2001, the whole series has now become an unintended elegy of sorts.

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New Releases, May 2011 (Special Podcast)

Monday, August 29, 2011

WNYC

It's that time of the month already!  John Schaefer once again picks through the spring flood of CDs that have been sent to his office to find new releases worthy of showcasing in tonight's program.  Among these outstanding piles is a new work from Roswell Rudd that features some musicians from West African and a new recording from Vieux Farka Toure, featuring his father, Ali Farka Toure. Also, hear music from a Greek group called Lüüp, and something from Montreallers, Esmerine, who just released a record in memory of Lhasa.  Plus, a collaborative record from dueling keyboardists Aaron Goldberg and Guillermo Klein, and music from a Swiss piano trio based on Turkish music.

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New Music for Electric Violin (Special Podcast)

Monday, August 15, 2011

WNYC

Listen to compositions for electric violin on this New Sounds program.  We'll hear Nico Muhly's Seeing Is Believing, a concerto for electric violin, which features the Aurora Orchestra and Thomas Gould on electric six-string violin, Also, we'll hear music by John Adams from his work, "The Dharma At Big Sur" - "Sri Moonshine" for electric violin and orchestra. It's an homage to the beat poets and to minimalists, like Terry Riley, with its Eastern-tinged strings and shimmering suspended chords.  Plus, other works.

 

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Mystics and the Mediterranean (Podcast Edition)

Friday, August 05, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we’ll sample liberally from the latest recording from Moroccan-born singer Amina Alaoui, called “Arco Iris.”  It’s a pan-Mediterranean blend of flamenco music from Spain, fado music from Portugal, Arab-Andalusian music and Brazilian choro, linked by jazz and a night in Tunisia.

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How Low Can You Go? (Special Podcast)

Monday, July 25, 2011

WNYC

We'll explore the deep tones of bands like Gato Loco whose lead instruments are the bass clarinet and the tuba on this New Sounds program.  There's even more from the tuba with music by Tom Heasley and some bass clarinet work by Marty Erlich.  We'll also hear the jazzy extensions of the bass saxophone in the works of the Maikotron Unit. 

 

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New Releases, April 2011 (Special Podcast)

Friday, July 08, 2011

WNYC

It's that time of the month again for the new releases show on New Sounds. John Schaefer carefully sorts through the stacks, bins, and towers of new CDs, records, and bandcamp sites which have come across his desk or into his email over the past month to present some choice cuts.

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Post-Minimalist Music (Special Podcast)

Friday, June 24, 2011

WNYC

Philip Glass’s piano works have had a longstanding and widespread influence – on the so-called Post-minimalist composers, but also on musicians working in the electronic dance world.  One of them is Francesco Tristano, who brings electronica’s repeating motifs back to the piano in his solo piece “The Melody.”  We’ll hear that, as well as several of William Duckworth’s “Time Curve Preludes,” often considered the first major Post-minimalist work, and a work from the late Canadian composer Ann Southam directly inspired by Glass’s piano works.

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An Alternate Score for Friday Night Lights

Friday, May 27, 2011

WNYC

To mark the last season of Friday Night Lights, the New Sounds All-Purpose Assistant has wheedled a way to have some of the music that should have scored the TV show- into a podcast!  Hear here this New Sounds go at scoring an episode (or three.)  
Sure, there is an expected inclusion, with Explosions in the Sky, and Efrim Manuel Menuck (Godspeed!) but get a listen to fellow Texans This Will Destroy You, Leeds, UK-based Vessels and the British post-rock band Codes in the Clouds.  The show was meant to be a thank-you note to the music supervisors in the guise of a “Recommended If You Like (RIYL) Explosions in the Sky.”  Get a load of that tremolo guitar, the shifting and swelling rockness of the instrumental slow-core.

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New Music with Voices

Friday, May 13, 2011

For this New Sounds, try on some layered voices in music by Julianna Barwick.  A superchoir of many Juliannas combines with warm drones and hypnotic piano to bring to mind Sigur Rós in a glacial cathedral.  Plus, there's also music from Toby Twining's latest, "Eurydice," which began as a score for Sarah Ruhl's play of the same name, and evolved into a many voiced interpretation of the Orpheus myth.  Those works, and much more.

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New Music from New Zealand (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, April 22, 2011

WNYC

New Zealand-based Jack Body has written electroacoustic compositions using field recordings from Indonesia (and has also written for the Kronos Quartet.)  We’ll hear his collage of street sounds and toys that ends with pigeons taking off, each with different sized whistles attached.  Also, there’s music from New Zealand composer Gareth Farr, who incorporates the sounds of Indonesian gamelan music into his writing.

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Musical Tributes (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, April 15, 2011

WNYC

We’ll hear musical tributes aplenty on this New Sounds program, many of them by guitarists heaping their thanks to other artists.  We’ll hear notes of appreciation from Bill Frisell to Boubacar Traoré and from trumpeter Dave Douglas to Bill Frisell.  Plus, tributes to Angelique Kidjo, John Fahey, and Philip Glass, and a few others.

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Newspeak & Alt-Classical Bands (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, April 01, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, listen to some "alt-classical" or "indie classical" bands, like Newspeak or the Paul Bailey Ensemble.  Newspeak is an eight-piece amplified ensemble working under the direction of composer David T. Little and clarinetist Eileen Mack. Named after the thought-limiting language in George Orwell’s 1984, Newspeak explores the grey area where art and politics mix.  We'll hear the group, from their "Sweet Light Crude" release, playing a work by Missy Mazzoli - "In spite of all this."

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New Releases, February 2011 (Weekly Podcast)

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

WNYC

It's that time again for the monthly program of new releases. John Schaefer picks through the boatloads of CDs that have flooded his inbox to find new releases worthy of showcasing in tonight's program. We'll hear from the new double-release by Todd Reynolds, "Outerborough," a collection of both his own works and pieces written for him by other folks.  Also, hopefully we will sample music from Corsican singers performing Tibetan music and Brooklyn-based Balkan brass band music.

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Collaborative Efforts (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, March 18, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we'll take a sneak peak at the forthcoming "Tirtha," a collaboration between the South Indian guitarist Prasanna   and pianist/composer Vijay Iyer.  Also, the venerable sax titan Charles Lloyd together with MacArthur “genius grant”-winning pianist Jason Moran, from a live performance on Soundcheck.  And more.

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Lost Music (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, March 11, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds Program, we’ll listen to intriguing music about being lost, both physically, and in the sense of just having no direction, and not knowing where you’re headed.  From duoJalal -violist Kathryn Lockwood and percussionist Yousif Sheronick- hear music by Kenji Bunch, an entire suite called “Lost & Found.”

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Modern Oratorios & Sacred Texts (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, March 04, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, hear some modern oratorios and other sacred texts set to music, including Kitty Brazelton's "Ecclesiastes: A Modern Oratorio," Phil Kline's "John the Revelator," and Douglas J. Cuomo's "Arjuna's Dilemma." Composer, professor, singer, improviser, multi-instrumentalist and bandleader Kitty Brazelton has written a modern oratorio with texts  from the Book of Ecclesiastes, re-translated from the Hebrew and Latin by Brazelton herself.  Her discoveries and deeper readings have uncovered a message that she believes Christians concealed in the 17th century; "live now—your life, whatever it is, is the gift—be grateful for everything, hardship or reward because you can’t understand where they will lead."

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New Music for Solo Guitar (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, February 25, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we’ll have at least a double-helping of guitar music, featuring some solo works by Marc Ribot intended as music for films: some are adaptations of music he has actually written for films, others for classic silent movies that he scored for his personal amusement, still others for films of his own imagination.  These haunting and wistful pieces explore, as Ribot says, "the strange area between language and spatiality that exists partly in between music and visual image, and partly as a common property of both."

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