Streams

Chamber Music with a Groove (special podcast)

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

WNYC

On this edition of New Sounds, hear some chamber music by composer Marc Mellits with a populist bent.  We’ll sample his work, “Tight Sweater," which contains traces of funk, echoes of rock, and minimalism's rapidly shifting patterns of notes and interlocking rhythms.  With the provocative and whimsical titles, ("Exposed Zipper," “Pickle Trousers” and “Mechanically Separated Chicken Parts”) the movements are compact and alarmingly catchy.

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A Musical Travelogue (special podcast)

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

WNYC

There’s an hour of music for far-off places on this New Sounds program.  Listen to a work written by Princeton professor Paul Lansky, called “Travel Diary.”  From a new recording by the Meehan/Perkins Duo, the work is a "kind of meditation on travel particularly for those who don't do it that much." Parts were inspired by an actual cross-country trip taken by the composer and his family, wrong turns and a younger child asking "Are we there yet?"

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New Releases, January 2012 (special podcast)

Thursday, May 10, 2012

WNYC

John Schaefer carefully sorts through the stacks, bins, and boatloads of new CDs, downloads, LPs, cassettes (!), which came across his desk this past January 2012. Hear some music by Guy Klucevsek, from his "the Multiple Personality Reunion tour," along with something from guitarist and experimenter Dustin Wong.  Also, listen to fiddle music from Brittany Haas & Dan Trueman and something from bassist/composer Florent Ghys.  Plus, a work from composer Zack Browning, as played by the Cadillac Moon Ensemble.  And more.

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Downtown Collaborations (Special Podcast)

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

WNYC

Jason Treuting, the percussionist/composer -his mallets, sticks, and music - certainly get around.   Treuting has made music with and for So Percussion, the Swedish folk-instrument wielding QQQ, the electronica duo Matmos, the Zappa-jazzy band Kneebody, and the guitarist/composer Steve Mackey, to name a few.  On this New Sounds, listen to music featuring Jason Treuting as soloist, collaborator, and composer.  There’s also music from multi-instrumentalist/composer Nick Zammuto, co-founder of the sonically and visually innovative duo the Books.

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Electro-Acoustic Ambient Works(Special Podcast)

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

WNYC

This New Sounds program samples a world of ambient works, with music from composers based in Iceland, Germany, Scotland, Poland, Sweden, and a work from a Brooklyn-based metal guitarist.  Listen to pulsing percussive ambient music by Berlin-based Nils Frahm, along with some stasis music featuring harpsichord by the Polish composer Jacaszek. Then, from Iceland, there's a score from composer, producer (and former metalhead) Olafur Arnalds, "Another Happy Day," with electro-acoustic soundscapes formed around piano and strings.

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Global Acoustic Music (Special Podcast)

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we’ll hear some global acoustic works from the Touré-Raichel Collective.  It’s a collaboration between Malian musician Vieux Farka Touré and Israeli producer/keyboardist Idan Raichel which came about following a concert in Tel Aviv.  The results are stunning and elegant conversations between guitar (Touré) and piano (Raichel), where the strings of the piano are sometimes plucked like a harp or kora.  The songs are anchored by Israeli bassist Yossi Fine and Malian calabash player Souleymane Kane.  ("The Tel Aviv Session" will be out in late March, 2012.)

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Cinematic Sounds of Iceland (Special Podcast)

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

WNYC

On this New Sounds program, we’ll hear a sampling of works from a concentrated new music hotspot: Iceland.  It’s a scene where rock music, orchestral music and electronics are blended freely and without regard for genre lines.  To get an idea, we’ll hear music by composer/producer Valgeir Sigurdsson, who balances chamber and classical against rock and electronica.  Plus, something from the now San Diego-based Anna Thorvaldsdottir, whose frosty orchestral music seems to invoke a shimmery soundworld of texures, even though it is played using just acoustic instruments on her record, “Rhizoma.”

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With the Alwan Arab Music Ensemble

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds podcast, listen to a live performance by the Alwan Arab Music Ensemble. It's a group of classical players, six members strong and based in New York, all of whom sing and play a wide range of Arab musical styles on traditional instruments.  Listen to Egyptian, Iraqi, and Syrian classical art music from Cairo, Baghdad, and the ancient city of Aleppo.

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Downtown, Then and Now

Monday, October 10, 2011

WNYC

Take a dip into minimal hypnotic music with something from composer/professor (theory and history of sound!) Anthony Moore and composer/artist Alexis Georgopoulos, who goes by “Arp.”  Moore was formerly a member of weird pop band Slapp Happy, and has also studied Indian classical music with Viram Jasani.  Georgopoulos used to be a member of California percussion ramble band Tussle and has written a few film scores and works for dance.  Together, these two punks have crafted a collection of tunes recalling the Penguin Café Orchestra stuck in a Möbius strip, with two for Englishman Robert Wyatt called “Wild Grass I & II.”

 

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New Releases, June 2011 (special podcast)

Monday, September 26, 2011

WNYC

It's that time of the month again for the new releases show on New Sounds. John Schaefer carefully sorts through the stacks, bins, and boatloads of new CDs which have come across his desk over the past month to present some of the finest new releases.

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Responsorium 9/11

Sunday, September 11, 2011

WNYC

Listen to Pulitzer-prize winning John Adams’ - “On the Transmigration of Souls,” written for the first anniversary of the attacks.  Then there's Michael Gordon’s “The Sad Park,” made from the electronically manipulated voices of children who witnessed the World Trade Center attack, and premiered in September of 2006.  Plus, an excerpt from Robert Moran’s brand-new “Trinity Requiem,” featuring the Trinity Youth Chorus.   

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Unintended Elegy

Saturday, September 10, 2011

WNYC

For this podcast edition of the program, listen to some of William Basinski's "Disintegration Loops." Finished in September of 2001, the whole series has now become an unintended elegy of sorts.

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New Releases, May 2011 (Special Podcast)

Monday, August 29, 2011

WNYC

It's that time of the month already!  John Schaefer once again picks through the spring flood of CDs that have been sent to his office to find new releases worthy of showcasing in tonight's program.  Among these outstanding piles is a new work from Roswell Rudd that features some musicians from West African and a new recording from Vieux Farka Toure, featuring his father, Ali Farka Toure. Also, hear music from a Greek group called Lüüp, and something from Montreallers, Esmerine, who just released a record in memory of Lhasa.  Plus, a collaborative record from dueling keyboardists Aaron Goldberg and Guillermo Klein, and music from a Swiss piano trio based on Turkish music.

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New Music for Electric Violin (Special Podcast)

Monday, August 15, 2011

WNYC

Listen to compositions for electric violin on this New Sounds program.  We'll hear Nico Muhly's Seeing Is Believing, a concerto for electric violin, which features the Aurora Orchestra and Thomas Gould on electric six-string violin, Also, we'll hear music by John Adams from his work, "The Dharma At Big Sur" - "Sri Moonshine" for electric violin and orchestra. It's an homage to the beat poets and to minimalists, like Terry Riley, with its Eastern-tinged strings and shimmering suspended chords.  Plus, other works.

 

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Mystics and the Mediterranean (Podcast Edition)

Friday, August 05, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we’ll sample liberally from the latest recording from Moroccan-born singer Amina Alaoui, called “Arco Iris.”  It’s a pan-Mediterranean blend of flamenco music from Spain, fado music from Portugal, Arab-Andalusian music and Brazilian choro, linked by jazz and a night in Tunisia.

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How Low Can You Go? (Special Podcast)

Monday, July 25, 2011

WNYC

We'll explore the deep tones of bands like Gato Loco whose lead instruments are the bass clarinet and the tuba on this New Sounds program.  There's even more from the tuba with music by Tom Heasley and some bass clarinet work by Marty Erlich.  We'll also hear the jazzy extensions of the bass saxophone in the works of the Maikotron Unit. 

 

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New Releases, April 2011 (Special Podcast)

Friday, July 08, 2011

WNYC

It's that time of the month again for the new releases show on New Sounds. John Schaefer carefully sorts through the stacks, bins, and towers of new CDs, records, and bandcamp sites which have come across his desk or into his email over the past month to present some choice cuts.

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Post-Minimalist Music (Special Podcast)

Friday, June 24, 2011

WNYC

Philip Glass’s piano works have had a longstanding and widespread influence – on the so-called Post-minimalist composers, but also on musicians working in the electronic dance world.  One of them is Francesco Tristano, who brings electronica’s repeating motifs back to the piano in his solo piece “The Melody.”  We’ll hear that, as well as several of William Duckworth’s “Time Curve Preludes,” often considered the first major Post-minimalist work, and a work from the late Canadian composer Ann Southam directly inspired by Glass’s piano works.

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An Alternate Score for Friday Night Lights

Friday, May 27, 2011

WNYC

To mark the last season of Friday Night Lights, the New Sounds All-Purpose Assistant has wheedled a way to have some of the music that should have scored the TV show- into a podcast!  Hear here this New Sounds go at scoring an episode (or three.)  
Sure, there is an expected inclusion, with Explosions in the Sky, and Efrim Manuel Menuck (Godspeed!) but get a listen to fellow Texans This Will Destroy You, Leeds, UK-based Vessels and the British post-rock band Codes in the Clouds.  The show was meant to be a thank-you note to the music supervisors in the guise of a “Recommended If You Like (RIYL) Explosions in the Sky.”  Get a load of that tremolo guitar, the shifting and swelling rockness of the instrumental slow-core.

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New Music with Voices

Friday, May 13, 2011

For this New Sounds, try on some layered voices in music by Julianna Barwick.  A superchoir of many Juliannas combines with warm drones and hypnotic piano to bring to mind Sigur Rós in a glacial cathedral.  Plus, there's also music from Toby Twining's latest, "Eurydice," which began as a score for Sarah Ruhl's play of the same name, and evolved into a many voiced interpretation of the Orpheus myth.  Those works, and much more.

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