Streams

New Releases, Dec. 2012 Special Podcast

Friday, January 18, 2013

WNYC

For this New Sounds, John Schaefer sifts through the avalanche of CDs (and digital offerings) piled up in his office to find a sampling of new releases worthy of showcasing in tonight's New Sounds program.  Also, he'll look back at some of the things that came out during 2012 that might have gone unnoticed on the chaos that is his desk, and ahead to some of the things that 2013 holds.  Listen to inventive voice-based music from Holly Herndon, some hypnotic plucked strings from Ljova, and some Zimbabwean music by way of Scandinavia in a collaborative project called Monoswezi.

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Abstract Soundscapes - Special Podcast

Friday, January 04, 2013

WNYC

For this New Sounds, listen to some abstract soundscapes from Poland, from Berlin via an Icelandic composer, and from Brooklyn-based musicians as well.  Hear a soundscape from the Berlin-based Icelandic one-woman band Kira Kira, from her record Feathermagnetik.  Also, listen to something from Brooklyn-based electronic artist Laurel Halo, featuring the voice as instrument.  Then, there's a percussion-centric work, "6," one of the number pieces from John Cage (whose 2012 centennial celebrations are still going on), and a percussive soundscape by another Brooklyn-based musician, drummer/composer Tim Kuhl.

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Tuff Strum

Friday, November 02, 2012

WNYC

Listen to “Cello Multitracks” on this New Sounds program.  It’s Gabriel Prokofiev's four-part suite scored for nine cellos, as realized by the technologically skilled cellist Peter Gregson, (yep, on all nine parts.) The work is sometimes jarring, sometimes it grooves, then it will like as not scuttle like dust bunnies, whether plucked or scraped.

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Afrofunk, Afrojazz & Afropop (Special Podcast)

Friday, October 19, 2012

WNYC

Hear the Ghanaian-rooted Afrofunk band KonKoma, (now based in the U.K.), along with recent releases and/or reissues of music from South, East, and West Africa. Sample selections from Zambian miners and minstrels, music from street musicians in Malawi, and some gorgeous acoustic Afropop from Mali.

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"Underground" Music

Friday, October 05, 2012

WNYC

Listen to music made in or about the underground – catacombs, cisterns, cellars- on this New Sounds.  There’s music by sax player, percussionist, and a composer for Sesame Street - Ken Field from his release “Subterranea,” recorded in several underground rooms in Roswell, New Mexico.  Ranging from overdubbed saxophones, 'sticks on juice cans, sticks on suitcase' and lots of percussion, the pieces include titles like “Five Saxophones in Search of Meaning” and “Om On the Range.”

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New Releases, March 2012

Friday, September 07, 2012

WNYC

It's that time of the month again for the new releases show on New Sounds. John Schaefer carefully sorts through the stacks, bins, and boatloads of new CDs and downloads, which have come across his desk over the past month to present some of the finest new releases. He'll pick the lentils from the ashes to present the cream of this crop.

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Piano Insides

Friday, August 24, 2012

WNYC

Explore the sounds of a piano's insides on this New Sounds program.  From the prepared piano to the bowed and/or plucked piano strings inside the body of the beast, there are sure to be unusual sounds galore.  Listen to Ergo, an electro-acoustic trio - somehow both slinky and spacey - with trombone, prepared piano, drums, and special guests on guitar.

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World Music Tour (Special Podcast Edition)

Friday, August 10, 2012

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we’ll hear music from Cape Verde, by a male pop-griot singer, Tcheka. He plays traditional percussive guitar and weaves the batuku style (a style traditional to the islands that was banned by the Portuguese, but continued by the women in the fields as they worked.) Plus, music for accordion and double-bass from Finland, and traditional music of West Java, featuring the kacapi, a boat-shaped zither.  And more.

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On a Large Scale

Friday, July 27, 2012

WNYC

On this New Sounds podcast, hear a world premiere recording by Dylan Mattingly written specifically for the New York-based ensemble of young musicians, Contemporaneous.  Mattingly is a composer, cellist and one of the founding co-artistic directors of the group (he’s also a pitcher for Bard College’s first ever club baseball team.)  Listen to part two of his epic and emotional poem for chamber orchestra depicting Amelia Earhart’s final flight, called “Atlas of Somewhere (On the Way to Howland Island): Islanded in a Stream of Stars.”

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New Releases, June 2012, Special Podcast Edition

Friday, July 13, 2012

WNYC

It's that time of the month again for the new releases show on New Sounds. John Schaefer carefully separates the wheat from the chaff for this show.  He'll sort through the stacks of new CDs, the strange Soundcloud free-associations, and the highly anticipated digital submissions which have come across his desk and into his inbox over the past month to present some of the finest new releases. He'll skim off the cream. He'll pick the lentils from the ashes. You get it.

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Leave a Message at the Beep (Special Podcast)

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

WNYC

From the melodious inflections of phone messages, listen to a number of works sourcing voicemails, most from tape(!) on this New Sounds program. Hear Irish composer Roger Doyle’s “Memento Mori,” composed around intimate verbal time capsules culled from various answering machine messages of Doyle's family, close friends and partners, all of them recorded and preserved in the late 80's.

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Chamber Music with a Groove (special podcast)

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

WNYC

On this edition of New Sounds, hear some chamber music by composer Marc Mellits with a populist bent.  We’ll sample his work, “Tight Sweater," which contains traces of funk, echoes of rock, and minimalism's rapidly shifting patterns of notes and interlocking rhythms.  With the provocative and whimsical titles, ("Exposed Zipper," “Pickle Trousers” and “Mechanically Separated Chicken Parts”) the movements are compact and alarmingly catchy.

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A Musical Travelogue (special podcast)

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

WNYC

There’s an hour of music for far-off places on this New Sounds program.  Listen to a work written by Princeton professor Paul Lansky, called “Travel Diary.”  From a new recording by the Meehan/Perkins Duo, the work is a "kind of meditation on travel particularly for those who don't do it that much." Parts were inspired by an actual cross-country trip taken by the composer and his family, wrong turns and a younger child asking "Are we there yet?"

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New Releases, January 2012 (special podcast)

Thursday, May 10, 2012

WNYC

John Schaefer carefully sorts through the stacks, bins, and boatloads of new CDs, downloads, LPs, cassettes (!), which came across his desk this past January 2012. Hear some music by Guy Klucevsek, from his "the Multiple Personality Reunion tour," along with something from guitarist and experimenter Dustin Wong.  Also, listen to fiddle music from Brittany Haas & Dan Trueman and something from bassist/composer Florent Ghys.  Plus, a work from composer Zack Browning, as played by the Cadillac Moon Ensemble.  And more.

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Downtown Collaborations (Special Podcast)

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

WNYC

Jason Treuting, the percussionist/composer -his mallets, sticks, and music - certainly get around.   Treuting has made music with and for So Percussion, the Swedish folk-instrument wielding QQQ, the electronica duo Matmos, the Zappa-jazzy band Kneebody, and the guitarist/composer Steve Mackey, to name a few.  On this New Sounds, listen to music featuring Jason Treuting as soloist, collaborator, and composer.  There’s also music from multi-instrumentalist/composer Nick Zammuto, co-founder of the sonically and visually innovative duo the Books.

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Electro-Acoustic Ambient Works(Special Podcast)

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

WNYC

This New Sounds program samples a world of ambient works, with music from composers based in Iceland, Germany, Scotland, Poland, Sweden, and a work from a Brooklyn-based metal guitarist.  Listen to pulsing percussive ambient music by Berlin-based Nils Frahm, along with some stasis music featuring harpsichord by the Polish composer Jacaszek. Then, from Iceland, there's a score from composer, producer (and former metalhead) Olafur Arnalds, "Another Happy Day," with electro-acoustic soundscapes formed around piano and strings.

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Global Acoustic Music (Special Podcast)

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we’ll hear some global acoustic works from the Touré-Raichel Collective.  It’s a collaboration between Malian musician Vieux Farka Touré and Israeli producer/keyboardist Idan Raichel which came about following a concert in Tel Aviv.  The results are stunning and elegant conversations between guitar (Touré) and piano (Raichel), where the strings of the piano are sometimes plucked like a harp or kora.  The songs are anchored by Israeli bassist Yossi Fine and Malian calabash player Souleymane Kane.  ("The Tel Aviv Session" will be out in late March, 2012.)

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Cinematic Sounds of Iceland (Special Podcast)

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

WNYC

On this New Sounds program, we’ll hear a sampling of works from a concentrated new music hotspot: Iceland.  It’s a scene where rock music, orchestral music and electronics are blended freely and without regard for genre lines.  To get an idea, we’ll hear music by composer/producer Valgeir Sigurdsson, who balances chamber and classical against rock and electronica.  Plus, something from the now San Diego-based Anna Thorvaldsdottir, whose frosty orchestral music seems to invoke a shimmery soundworld of texures, even though it is played using just acoustic instruments on her record, “Rhizoma.”

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With the Alwan Arab Music Ensemble

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds podcast, listen to a live performance by the Alwan Arab Music Ensemble. It's a group of classical players, six members strong and based in New York, all of whom sing and play a wide range of Arab musical styles on traditional instruments.  Listen to Egyptian, Iraqi, and Syrian classical art music from Cairo, Baghdad, and the ancient city of Aleppo.

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Downtown, Then and Now

Monday, October 10, 2011

WNYC

Take a dip into minimal hypnotic music with something from composer/professor (theory and history of sound!) Anthony Moore and composer/artist Alexis Georgopoulos, who goes by “Arp.”  Moore was formerly a member of weird pop band Slapp Happy, and has also studied Indian classical music with Viram Jasani.  Georgopoulos used to be a member of California percussion ramble band Tussle and has written a few film scores and works for dance.  Together, these two punks have crafted a collection of tunes recalling the Penguin Café Orchestra stuck in a Möbius strip, with two for Englishman Robert Wyatt called “Wild Grass I & II.”

 

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