Streams

Kelefa Sanneh and Leo Carey on Dapper Dan.

Monday, March 18, 2013

This week in the magazine, Kelefa Sanneh writes about Dapper Dan, the Harlem designer whose flashy fur-lined leather coats helped shape hip-hop style. Here, Sanneh and Leo Carey talk with Sasha Weiss about status and influence in men's fashion, as well as The New Yorker style when it comes to writing about clothes. Also, some Fung Wah blues.
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Kelefa Sanneh and Leo Carey on Dapper Dan.

Monday, March 18, 2013

This week in the magazine, Kelefa Sanneh writes about Dapper Dan, the Harlem designer whose flashy fur-lined leather coats helped shape hip-hop style. Here, Sanneh and Leo Carey talk with Sasha Weiss about status and influence in men's fashion, as well as The New Yorker style when it comes to writing about clothes. Also, some Fung Wah blues.
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Jane Kramer on cooking and writing

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

This week in the magazine, Jane Kramer reviews "Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat," by the British food writer and historian Bee Wilson. It's more than a book review, though: The New Yorker's European correspondent brings into it her own passion for cooking and her years of writing about food. In this week's New Yorker Out Loud, Sasha Weiss visits Kramer in her New York apartment to talk about cooking, kitchens, and why food is so central to her life. Also, James Surowiecki weighs in on Yahoo's decision to ban telecommuting.
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Jane Kramer on cooking and writing

Monday, March 11, 2013

This week in the magazine, Jane Kramer reviews "Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat," by the British food writer and historian Bee Wilson. It's more than a book review, though: The New Yorker's European correspondent brings into it her own passion for cooking and her years of writing about food. In this week's New Yorker Out Loud, Sasha Weiss visits Kramer in her New York apartment to talk about cooking, kitchens, and why food is so central to her life. Also, James Surowiecki weighs in on Yahoo's decision to ban telecommuting.
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Jeffrey Toobin and Margaret Talbot on Ruth Bader Ginsberg

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

This week in the magazine, Jeffrey Toobin writes a Profile of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who even before her time on the Supreme Court played an important role in shaping the legal framework for womens rights and gender discrimination. Here Toobin and Margaret Talbot talk with Amy Davidson about Ginsburgs legacy and some of the current issues the Court is addressing. Also, fiction from a veteran of the war in Afghanistan.
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Jeffrey Toobin and Margaret Talbot on Ruth Bader Ginsberg

Monday, March 04, 2013

This week in the magazine, Jeffrey Toobin writes a Profile of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who even before her time on the Supreme Court played an important role in shaping the legal framework for womens rights and gender discrimination. Here Toobin and Margaret Talbot talk with Amy Davidson about Ginsburgs legacy and some of the current issues the Court is addressing. Also, fiction from a veteran of the war in Afghanistan.
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John Colapinto on vocal-cord injuries

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

This week in the magazine, John Colapinto writes about Dr. Steven Zeitels, who has treated the vocal cords of many famous singers, including Adele, James Taylor, Cher, and Roger Daltrey. Here, Colapinto talks with Sasha Weiss about his own damaged vocal cords and the mysterious powers of the human voice. Also, David Owen on his Purell conversion.
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John Colapinto on vocal-cord injuries

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

This week in the magazine, John Colapinto writes about Dr. Steven Zeitels, who has treated the vocal cords of many famous singers, including Adele, James Taylor, Cher, and Roger Daltrey. Here, Colapinto talks with Sasha Weiss about his own damaged vocal cords and the mysterious powers of the human voice. Also, David Owen on his Purell conversion.
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Alexander Stille and John Cassidy on Pope Benedict XVI

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Last week, Pope Benedict XVI surprised the world by announcing his retirement, saying that he no longer had the strength for the job. Will his break with a centuries-old tradition of dying in office transform the papacyand the Church? And how about his successor? Benedict's contentious legacy is the subject of this week's New Yorker Out Loud with Alexander Stille and John Cassidy speaking with Amy Davidson. Also, a very short, romantically blighted poem.
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Alexander Stille and John Cassidy on Pope Benedict XVI

Monday, February 18, 2013

Last week, Pope Benedict XVI surprised the world by announcing his retirement, saying that he no longer had the strength for the job. Will his break with a centuries-old tradition of dying in office transform the papacyand the Church? And how about his successor? Benedict's contentious legacy is the subject of this week's New Yorker Out Loud with Alexander Stille and John Cassidy speaking with Amy Davidson. Also, a very short, romantically blighted poem.
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David Remnick and Ian Frazier on Joseph Mitchell

Monday, February 11, 2013

Joseph Mitchell started at The New Yorker in 1938, and was a staff writer for fifty-eight years, until his death in 1996. His journalism chronicled everyday life in New York Cityhe wrote about Mohawk steelworkers, fishermen, street-preachers, bartenders, ticket-takers, and bearded ladies. In the mid nineteen-sixties, he stopped publishing any work in the magazine. But apparently he never stopped writing. In this week's issue, there's a previously unpublished chapter from an unfinished memoir that he started in the late nineteen-sixties and early nineteen-seventies. Here, The New Yorker's editor David Remnick and staff writer Ian Frazier talk with Sasha Weiss about their memories of Mitchell, why he didn't publish for so many decades, and the influence his writing has had on them and on the magazine.
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David Remnick and Ian Frazier on Joseph Mitchell

Monday, February 11, 2013

Joseph Mitchell started at The New Yorker in 1938, and was a staff writer for fifty-eight years, until his death in 1996. His journalism chronicled everyday life in New York Cityhe wrote about Mohawk steelworkers, fishermen, street-preachers, bartenders, ticket-takers, and bearded ladies. In the mid nineteen-sixties, he stopped publishing any work in the magazine. But apparently he never stopped writing. In this week's issue, there's a previously unpublished chapter from an unfinished memoir that he started in the late nineteen-sixties and early nineteen-seventies. Here, The New Yorker's editor David Remnick and staff writer Ian Frazier talk with Sasha Weiss about their memories of Mitchell, why he didn't publish for so many decades, and the influence his writing has had on them and on the magazine.
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Patrick Radden Keefe and David Grann on crime reporting.

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

This week in the magazine, Patrick Radden Keefe investigates the Amy Bishop case. In 2010 Bishop shot and killed several colleagues at the University of Alabama. In the aftermath of that crime, it was revealed that Bishop had shot and killed her brother in 1986, which Bishop and her parents have always claimed was an accident. Here Keefe and New Yorker staff writer David Grann talk with their editor Daniel Zalewski about the Amy Bishop story, non-fiction crime writing more generally, and how to approach the truth when certainty is impossible. Also, Kelefa Sanneh on drinking Scotch.
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Patrick Radden Keefe and David Grann on crime reporting.

Monday, February 04, 2013

This week in the magazine, Patrick Radden Keefe investigates the Amy Bishop case. In 2010 Bishop shot and killed several colleagues at the University of Alabama. In the aftermath of that crime, it was revealed that Bishop had shot and killed her brother in 1986, which Bishop and her parents have always claimed was an accident. Here Keefe and New Yorker staff writer David Grann talk with their editor Daniel Zalewski about the Amy Bishop story, non-fiction crime writing more generally, and how to approach the truth when certainty is impossible. Also, Kelefa Sanneh on drinking Scotch.
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Simon Rich on funny writing.

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

This week, Simon Rich's new novella "Sell Out" is being serialized on newyorker.com. It's the story of Simon Rich's great-great-grandfather, who falls into a pickle barrel and emerges, one hundred years later, into hipster Brooklyn. On the podcast this week, Rich reads excerpts from the first installment, and then talks with Susan Morrison about the inspiration for his novella, his experiences writing for Saturday Night Live, and his love of the comedic premise, as practiced by Roald Dahl, T. C. Boyle, Douglas Adams, Kurt Vonnegut, and others.
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Simon Rich on funny writing.

Monday, January 28, 2013

This week, Simon Rich's new novella "Sell Out" is being serialized on newyorker.com. It's the story of Simon Rich's great-great-grandfather, who falls into a pickle barrel and emerges, one hundred years later, into hipster Brooklyn. On the podcast this week, Rich reads excerpts from the first installment, and then talks with Susan Morrison about the inspiration for his novella, his experiences writing for Saturday Night Live, and his love of the comedic premise, as practiced by Roald Dahl, T. C. Boyle, Douglas Adams, Kurt Vonnegut, and others.
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Adam Gopnik on 3-D sound studies.

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

This week in the magazine, Adam Gopnik tries to unravel the science behind our love of music. Here Gopnik talks with managing editor Amelia Lester about how different his own early experiences with music were from those of his children, and why the shift from vinyl and hi-fi to MP3s and earbuds isnt such a bad thing. Also, an epic out-of-office message from S.N.L. writer Colin Jost.
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Adam Gopnik on 3-D sound studies.

Monday, January 21, 2013

This week in the magazine, Adam Gopnik tries to unravel the science behind our love of music. Here Gopnik talks with managing editor Amelia Lester about how different his own early experiences with music were from those of his children, and why the shift from vinyl and hi-fi to MP3s and earbuds isnt such a bad thing. Also, an epic out-of-office message from S.N.L. writer Colin Jost.
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James Wood and Ann Goldstein on the novels of Elena Ferrante.

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

This week in the magazine, James Wood reviews the novels of the mysterious Italian writer "Elena Ferrante." Ferrante writes under a pseudonymalmost nothing is known about her true identity. Here Sasha Weiss talks with James Wood and Ann Goldstein, Ferrante's English translator, about her intensely personal, often brutally honest writing. Also, Rebecca Mead on season three of "Downton Abbey."
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James Wood and Ann Goldstein on the novels of Elena Ferrante.

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

This week in the magazine, James Wood reviews the novels of the mysterious Italian writer "Elena Ferrante." Ferrante writes under a pseudonymalmost nothing is known about her true identity. Here Sasha Weiss talks with James Wood and Ann Goldstein, Ferrante's English translator, about her intensely personal, often brutally honest writing. Also, Rebecca Mead on season three of "Downton Abbey."
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