Streams

Nick Paumgarten and Peter Schjeldahl on the art world.

Monday, November 25, 2013

The recent sale at auction of a Francis Bacon triptych for $142.4 million has people talking, including Peter Schjeldahl and Nick Paumgarten. Paumgarten was at the auction, and, in this week's issue, he profiles one of the biggest players in the international art market, David Zwirner. Schjeldahl, the magazine's art critic, has also written about dealers and gallerists. In this week's podcast, they talk about art-market excess with the literary editor of The New Yorkers Web site, Sasha Weiss. Also, a song celebrating Thanksgivukkah.
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Richard Brody and Emily Nussbaum on depicting sex onscreen.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The French film "Blue is the Warmest Color" has been the subject of a lot of critical discussion, partly for its explicit depictions of lesbian sex. Here, Sasha Weiss talks with Richard Brody and Emily Nussbaum about their reactions to the film and what makes for good and bad sex in television and film. Brody, who has blogged about "Blue is the Warmest Color," thought the use of sex in the film was masterful. Nussbaum had a more mixed reaction and pointed to scenes from HBO's "Girls" and "The Big Chill" as examples of sex scenes she found more affecting. Also on the podcast, Ethan Kuperberg does stand-up therapy.
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Peter Hessler on writing about small towns.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

In this week's issue, Peter Hessler writes about how the Egyptian revolution has played out Abydos, a small village in Upper Egypt. Here Sasha Weiss speaks with Hessler about why he likes to report from small towns, and how his years in China have helped him understand life in Egypt more clearly. Hessler explains how political power is expressed on the village level in both Egypt and China, and why we haven't seen a Chinese version of the Arab Spring. Weiss also asks about his piece on a small-town pharmacist in Colorado, and how he approaches writing about individuals and communities. Separately, Jeffrey Eugenides does his best Texan accent.
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Dan Chiasson on Marianne Moore.

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

This week in the magazine, Dan Chiasson reviews Linda Leavell's new biography of the modernist poet Marianne Moore, "Holding On Upside Down." Here Chiasson talks with Sasha Weiss and Giles Harvey about Moore's poetry and her mother, with whom Moore lived for most of her life, and who was intimately involved in the creation of her greatest poems. Also, Ian Crouch peeks behind George Lucas's curtain. Audio of Marianne Moore in this podcast is excerpted from the Poetry Center Digital Archive, which is made available under a Creative Commons license.
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Lauren Collins and Dana Goodyear on adventurous eating.

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

This week in the magazine, Lauren Collins reports on the quest for the world's hottest pepper, and Dana Goodyear examines the food taboos surrounding whale and horse meat. Here they talk with Amelia Lester about the strangest foods they've ever eaten (including abalone and unhatched duck embryos), how gender roles shape eating habits, and what's behind our food taboos. Also, Richard Brody discusses baseball beards.
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D. T. Max and Nathan Heller on San Francisco.

Monday, October 21, 2013

In recent issues of the magazine, D. T. Max Profiled Jack Dorsey, one of the founders of Twitter, and Nathan Heller wrote about the values and lifestyles of young San Francisco entrepreneurs. Here, they both talk with Sasha Weiss about why the cultural center of gravity may have shifted west to San Francisco, how the economic and creative force of the tech industry is changing the city, and what it means for the rest of the country. Also on the podcast, why the poet Brad Leithauser finds some words unusable.
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Louis Menand and Richard Brody on Norman Mailer

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Norman Mailer died six years ago, and, already, five biographies have been written about him. The most recent is J. Michael Lennon's "Norman Mailer: A Double Life," which is a springboard for an essay on Mailer by Louis Menand in this week's issue. Here, Menand and the film critic Richard Brody talk about Mailer's life and legacy with the literary editor of the New Yorker's Web site, Sasha Weiss. Also on the podcast, Deborah Treisman explains why Alice Munro's first story in the magazine in 1977 caused an in-house ruckus.
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Jeremy Denk on Bach’s “Goldberg Variations”

Monday, October 07, 2013

In this week's issue of the magazine, the Money Issue, pianist Jeremy Denk revisits a kitschy musician-for-hire gig from early in his career. Denk was just awarded a fellowship by the MacArthur Foundation, and he's on tour now to promote his latest album, "J. S. Bach: Goldberg Variations." He spoke with Leo Carey and Sasha Weiss about the challenges of playing music that everybody knows, what he loves about the Goldberg Variations, and how writing fits into his musical career. Also on the podcast, one man's personal debt ceiling.
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Claudia Roth Pierpont on Philip Roth

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

This week in the magazine, Claudia Roth Pierpont examines the long career of novelist Philip Roth and his many literary friendships. Here, Pierpont talks with Sasha Weiss about Roth's relationships with Saul Bellow and John Updike, the portrayal of women in Roth's novels, and why people confuse his characters with the writer himself. Also on the podcast, Peter Schjeldahl on the cats and controversial girls of Balthus.
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Emily Nussbaum and Jelani Cobb on “Key & Peele”

Monday, September 23, 2013

This week in the magazine, Emily Nussbaum reviews the third season of the sketch-comedy show "Key & Peele." Jelani Cobb writes frequently about race and culture for newyorker.com, and his essay on Dave Chapelle and African-American comedy is collected in his book "The Devil and Dave Chappelle." Here, Sasha Weiss talks with Nussbaum and Cobb about how Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele's biracial identities allow them to cross lines other comics might avoid, and how their humor moves past mockery towards empathy. Also on the podcast, Simon Parkin on why we're about to hear a lot more about video game violence.
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Susan Morrison and Rebecca Mead on work clothes.

Monday, September 16, 2013

In the September 23rd issue of the magazine, the Style Issue, Rebecca Mead profiles Andrew Rosen, the C.E.O. of the fashion company Theory. The company found success in the nineties by making stylish and comfortable work clothes for women. Here, Mead talks with Susan Morrison, who edited the issue, and Sasha Weiss, the literary editor of newyorker.com. They discuss the effort it takes to look effortless, how the codes of dressing for work have changed over the years, and why people who work at The New Yorker are sometimes referred to as "the Waltons." Also, Ethan Kuperberg has an S.A.T. test for adults.
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Tad Friend and Emily Nussbaum on “Breaking Bad.”

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

This week in the magazine, Tad Friend writes a Profile of Bryan Cranston, who plays the drug kingpin Walter White on AMC's "Breaking Bad." The show is currently wrapping up its final season. On the podcast, Sasha Weiss talks with Emily Nussbaum and Friend about what has made the show so satisfying. Nussbaum, The New Yorker's TV critic, explores how Walter White adds a layer of punishing moral complexity to the the vicarious thrills of a traditional anti-hero, and Friend explains how Bryan Cranston's understanding of Walter differed from that of Vince Gilligan, the show's creator. Also on the podcast, Andrew Marantz on the "Truman Show" delusion.
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Malcolm Gladwell and Ben McGrath on doping in sports.

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

This week in the magazine, Malcolm Gladwell reviews David Epstein's "The Sports Gene," which looks at the biological advantages of elite athletes, from extra-long Achilles tendons to exceptionally high red-blood-cell counts. Here, Nicholas Thompson talks with Gladwell and Ben McGrath about our inconsistent ideas about fairness in sports and whether doping should or shouldn't be allowed. Gladwell asks, if we allow laser surgery to improve eyesight or Tommy John surgery to replace ligaments, why don't we allow athletes to take F.D.A. approved testosterone, in doses that are not harmful, in order to accelerate their recovery time after workouts and competition? He argues that we should legalize performance-enhancing drugs and then regulate them, and imagines a world where athletes make their biological passports public: "What I really would like is to have complete liberalization and complete transparency. I would like to know about every single baseball player, track-and-field athlete, basketball player, precisely what they are on. And then I'd like to reach my own conclusions as a fan about how to evaluate their performance." Thompson presses Gladwell on his own feelings as a fan of track-and-field athletes, and argues that the sport of running would be diminished by allowing P.E.D.s. Gladwell counters that "those days of running innocence" are already long gone, and that we need to accept that, for better or worse, doping is a part of athletic competition in the modern world. Also on the podcast, Sarah Larson celebrates Linda Ronstadt's voice.
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Rebecca Mead and Joshua Rothman on Jane Austen.

Monday, August 26, 2013

This week in the magazine, Anthony Lane reviews "Austenland," one of many films on Jane Austen's work, or in this case, on the fans of her work. Not everyone loves Jane Austen, but her fans definitely include Joshua Rothman, the New Yorker's archive editor, and staff writer Rebecca Mead. They've both written about Jane Austen for newyorker.com, and they recently spoke about the enduring appeal of her books with Sasha Weiss.
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Richard Brody and Ryan Bloom discuss a recently recovered play by Camus.

Monday, August 19, 2013

At Page-Turner last week, we published "The Life of the Artist: A Mimodrama in Two Parts," a newly translated short play by Albert Camus. Here, the New Yorker editor Leo Carey reads selections from the text, and the translator Ryan Bloom talks to Richard Brody about the play and where it fits into Camus's life. Also, James Surowiecki considers the high price of lobster in restaurants when the wholesale price of lobster is plummeting.
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Nicholson Baker about writing and technology.

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

This week on the podcast, Michael Agger talks with Nicholson Baker about writing and technology, including his recent piece on LCD screens. Baker explains his unorthodox writing techniques, what kinds of fiction make for the best dreams, and how he combats "peak attention span" by reading aloud in the morning.
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Sarah Stillman and Patrick Radden Keefe on civil forfeiture.

Monday, August 05, 2013

This week in the magazine, Sarah Stillman reports on how local governments around the country are invoking the powers of civil forfeiture to take money and property from people who haven't been convicted of any crime. Here, Nicholas Thompson talks with Stillman and Patrick Radden Keefe about these abuses and what they mean for the citizens targeted and the law-enforcement agencies using it to fund their budgets. Also, Christian DeBenedetti on the joys of sour beer.
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Cressida Leyshon and Ruth Franklin on Shirley Jackson.

Monday, July 29, 2013

This week in the magazine there's a new, previously unpublished story by Shirley Jackson, who died in 1965. It's called "Paranoia," and its about a man in New York City who is followed through the city by a suspicious character. In this week's podcast, Cressida Leyshon, the deputy fiction editor, and Ruth Franklin, who is writing a biography of Shirley Jackson, talk about the story and about Jackson's life with the literary editor of newyorker.com, Sasha Weiss. Also, Hilton Als weighs in on "The Designated Mourner."
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Bill Buford and John Bennet on French cooking.

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

This week in the magazine, Bill Buford writes about cooking traditional French recipes with the chef Daniel Boulud. Buford has been living in Lyon for the last several years learning French cooking, and here he talks with John Bennet and Sasha Weiss about how the militaristic system of training chefs in the national cuisine has changed his approach to cooking, the similarities between soccer hooligans and cooks, and why he's so fascinated with food. Also, Patricia Marx explains how to avoid cognitive decline.
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Bill Buford and John Bennet on French cooking.

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

This week in the magazine, Bill Buford writes about cooking traditional French recipes with the chef Daniel Boulud. Buford has been living in Lyon for the last several years learning French cooking, and here he talks with John Bennet and Sasha Weiss about how the militaristic system of training chefs in the national cuisine has changed his approach to cooking, the similarities between soccer hooligans and cooks, and why he's so fascinated with food. Also, Patricia Marx explains how to avoid cognitive decline.
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