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October's Book: Cloud Atlas, by David Mitchell

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

David Mitchell, two-time finalist for the Booker Prize, joins us to talk about his 2004 novel Cloud Atlas. The story is told through six separate but related narratives, each set in a different time and place, and written in a different style. Novelist Michael Chabon called it “not just dazzling, amusing, or clever but heartbreaking and passionate, too.”

If you have a question for David Mitchell, leave a comment below! 

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Video: Alex Prud'homme on Collaborating with Julia Child

Friday, September 21, 2012

When Alex Prud'homme was here for the Lopate Show Book Club conversation about Julia Child's memoir My Life in France, he shared some memories of his great-aunt.

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August-September's Book: My Life in France, by Julia Child and Alex Prud'homme

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Julia Child is widely credited with single handedly teaching America about the pleasures of good cooking with her groundbreaking cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking and her television show The French Chef. She would have turned 100 years old on August 15, and to celebrate her contributions to cooking and culture, the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club selection for August-September is her memoir, My Life in France, written with her grand-nephew Alex Prud’homme. He joins us to talk about her life, how she learned to cook in France, and how she became a brilliant teacher and writer. When she passed away in 2004, she and Alex were working on the book, about what Julia Child described as the best years of her life, and Alex finished it and published it in 2006.

Join the conversation—leave your comments and questions below!

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Sign Up for the Book Club E-Newsletter & Register for Audible Giveaway!

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

The monthly newsletter fills you in on our Book Club selections, author interviews, and links to literary news and events. When you sign up for the newsletter now through February 14, you'll be registered for a drawing to receive a 3-month membership to Audible.com! Sign up now!

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Video: Questions for Jeffrey Eugenides

Wednesday, August 08, 2012

Jeffrey Eugenides talks about his literary influences, the city of Detroit, and why he's grown to hate the word "sucks."

 

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July’s Book: Middlesex, by Jeffrey Eugenides

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Middlesex  won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and it’s the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club’s selection for July! It tells the story of Calliope Stephanides and three generations of the Greek-American Stephanides family who travel from a tiny village overlooking Mount Olympus to Detroit, then to the tree-lined streets of suburban Grosse Pointe. Calliope is not like other girls—she has to uncover a family secret and piece together her genetic history in order to reveal who she truly is. Jeffrey Eugenides joins us to discuss the novel.

Get the conversation started now by leaving a comment or question about the book!

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June's Book: The Art of Fielding, by Chad Harbach

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Chad Harbach’s novel The Art of Fielding is the next pick for the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club! It was named one of 2011’s best books by the New York Times and The New Yorker.  Set at a midwestern college where a star shortstop has transformed the school’s baseball team, it follows five characters grappling with the consequences of one wild throw.

Get the conversation started now—leave a comment or question below!

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Video: Questions for Teju Cole

Monday, May 07, 2012

Teju Cole is an art historian and a photographer as well as a writer. Find out what artists and writers influence him.

See Teju Cole's photographs on Flickr—in color and in black and white. You can also visit his web site to find out more about his work.

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May's Book: Open City, by Teju Cole

Monday, May 07, 2012

Teju Cole's debut novel, Open City, is about a young Nigerian doctor who wanders around Manhattan reflecting on his relationships, recent breakup, and his past. Although it's set in busy, crowded New York City, the novel explores themes of isolation, dislocation, and identity. The New Yorker called Open City "Beautiful, subtle—and original...A prismatic debut," and it was awarded the 2012 PEN/Hemingway Award.

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May's Book Club Author, Teju Cole, on NPR's Morning Edition

Monday, April 09, 2012

Teju Cole was on Morning Edition this morning talking about composing Tweets about small, easily overlooked articles in the newspaper. Listen to that interview here!

And start reading his novel Open City and leave a comment or question for our Book Club discussion on May 7.

 

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April’s Book: Housekeeping, by Marilynne Robinson

Thursday, April 05, 2012

Marilynne Robinson explores themes of love, loneliness, and survival in her debut novel Housekeeping. Published in 1980, it tells the story of Ruth and Lucille, two sisters growing up with only each for emotional support as they live with various relations in a remote town in the Far West.

Share your thoughts and comments below to join the conversation and watch a video of Marilynne Robinson discussing her favorite authors, writing habits and more!

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Video: Questions for Daniel Okrent

Thursday, March 08, 2012

Daniel Okrent was here in March to talk about his book Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition for the Book Club. He talked about his favorite writers and why he urges reporters—and everyone else—to avoid the word "indeed."

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March's Book: The Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition, by Daniel Okrent

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

Daniel Okrent, former Public Editor for the New York Times, examines how and why we came to outlaw alcohol in this country, what life under Prohibition was like, and how it changed the country forever. In Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition , he shows how diverse forces came together to bring about Prohibition: the growing political power of the women’s suffrage movement, which allied itself with the antiliquor campaign; the fear of small-town Protestants that they were losing control of their country to the immigrants in the cities; the anti-German sentiment stoked by World War I; and a variety of other factors, ranging from the rise of the automobile to the advent of the income tax.

Pick up a copy and start reading! Daniel Okrent will be here on March 6 to talk about the book. Leave your questions and comments below to join the conversation!

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Video: Questions for Téa Obreht

Monday, February 27, 2012

Téa Obreht tells us that her absolute favorite book is The Master and Margarita, by Mikhail Bulkagov, and that she's very superstitious.

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Author Alice Munro on the Lopate Show

Friday, February 10, 2012

Every month, as part of the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club's e-newsletter, we're bringing an author interview from our archives. This month, listen to a rare 2002 conversation that Leonard had with Canadian writer Alice Munro. She had just published her short story collection, Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage.

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February's Book: The Tiger's Wife, by Téa Obreht

Wednesday, February 08, 2012

February’s Leonard Lopate Show Book Club selection is Téa Obreht’s critically acclaimed novel, The Tiger’s Wife. It tells the story of Natalia, a young doctor in an unnamed Balkan country still recovering from war, who starts investigating the circumstances surrounding the death of her grandfather who raised her. As she investigates his death, the complexities of life, war, and her grandfather’s life come to light.

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Video: Questions for Gary Shteyngart

Saturday, January 14, 2012

Novelist Gary Shteyngart admits he has no hope for the future and has an unfortunate sense of humor (but he's still very funny).

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January's Book: Absurdistan, by Gary Shteyngart

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Our first book club pick of 2012 is Gary Shteyngart’s novel, Absurdistan. It tells the story of Misha Vainberg, a young Russian immigrant whose hopes of a U.S. visa are dashed by his father. Forced to leave New York, Misha moves to Absurdistan, a tiny, oil-rich nation where he finds, among other things, civil war, corruption, and love. Get your copy today and start reading this slapstick satire, which the New York Times named one of the 10 best books of 2006!

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Video: Questions for Ruth Reichl

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

Ruth Reichl tells us what are the most important ingredients to have on hand at home, and why the word "divine" should never be applied to food.

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