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Latest Episode / Friday, August 01, 2014 Edit This

A Chilling Effect

We’ll look at the chilling effect that government surveillance is having on journalists who cover national security, intelligence, and law enforcement. Playwright Stephen Adly Guirgis talks about his new play “Between Riverside and Crazy,” along with director Austin Pendleton and Stephen McKinley Henderson, who stars in it. Time magazine’s Bryan Walsh explains how invasive alien species are causing environmental and economic problems. This week’s Please Explain is all about freezing, canning, and pickling!

Segments and Articles

'Between Riverside and Crazy'

Friday, August 01, 2014

The playwright, director, and star discuss the new play "Between Riverside and Crazy."

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Invasive Species

Friday, August 01, 2014

Lion fish, zebra mussels, emerald ash borer, phragmites, and kudzu are among the 50,000 alien species that have taken off in the United States.

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Please Explain How to Preserve Food

Friday, August 01, 2014

Learn how to preserve summer fruits, vegetables, and herbs so you can enjoy them all year long.

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Make the Most of Your CSA Vegetables

Thursday, July 31, 2014

If you get a CSA share, you might find yourself stumped, wondering how to cook vegetables like kohlrabi and bok choy and broccoli rabe. Leonard picked up his CSA bag this morning, and Melissa Clark is here to share her ideas for how to use the summer's fresh vegetables. She's a New York Times Dining Section columnist and cookbook writer, and her most recent cookbook is Cook This Now: 120 Easy and Delectable Dishes You Can't Wait to Make.

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Guest Picks: Rivka Galchen

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Rivka Galchen was on the show July 31, 2014. She told Leonard that she's a fan of Lucille Ball. Find out what else she's a fan of!

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Life Without Parole—At the Age of 15

Thursday, July 31, 2014

The United States is the only country in the world that routinely sentences juveniles to life in prison. Kenneth Young was 15 when he received four consecutive life sentences for a series of armed robberies. He has spent more than a decade behind bars, a U.S. Supreme Court decision could set him free. Director Nadine Pequeneza talks about Young’s case, the subject of her documentary “15 to Life: Kenneth’s Story.” She’s joined by Mishi Faruqee, juvenile justice policy strategist at the ACLU. The documentary airs August 4 on PBS.

 

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Recipe: Melissa Clark's Roasted Eggplant with Basil Green Goddess Dressing

Thursday, July 31, 2014

A quick and easy recipe for this summer's eggplant and fresh herbs. 

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Recipe: Melissa Clark's Tomatoes in Peanut Sauce

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Made with coconut milk, ginger, and Thai basil, and peanuts.

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Using Your CSA Vegetables

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Melissa Clark offers many suggestions for what to make with all the fresh vegetables available this summer. We’ll find out what the fact that the US is the only country in the world that sentences juveniles to life in prison means for one young man who’s already served more than a decade behind bars. Rivka Galchen discusses her new collection of short stories, called American Innovations. Luke Nichter talks about digitizing and transcribing 3,700 hours of recordings President Nixon made and what they reveal about his presidency.

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Reinventing Classic Short Stories by Gogol, Thurber, Borges

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Rivka Galchen discusses her new collection of short stories, American Innovations. In one story, a young woman’s furniture walks out on her.  In another, the narrator feels compelled to deliver a takeout order that has incorrectly been phoned in to her. Many of the stories in this collection mirror stories by Borges, Gogol, and James Thurber.

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Richard Nixon Recorded 3,700 Hours of Tape. Luke Nichter Listened to Them All

Thursday, July 31, 2014

President Nixon's voice-activated taping system captured every word spoken in the Oval Office, Cabinet Room, other key locations in the White House, and at Camp David. Some 3,700 hours of recordings were made between 1971 and 1973, yet less than 5 percent of those conversations have ever been transcribed and published. Luke Nichter talks about the project to digitize and transcribe the tapes and what they reveal about Nixon’s time in office. The Nixon Tapes: 1971-1972 by Douglas Brinkley and Nichter is an unprecedented account of one of the most important and controversial presidencies in U.S. history, and offers a selection of scenes from the year Nixon opened relations with China, negotiated the SALT I arms agreement with the Soviet Union, and won a landslide reelection victory. All the while, the growing shadow of Watergate and Nixon's political downfall crept closer and closer.

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Guest Picks: Andrew Jewell

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Andrew Jewell, one of the subjects of the film "Rich Hill," was on the show July 30, 2014. He's a fan of Bob Marley. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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Guest Picks: Tracy Droz Tragos

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Tracy Droz Tragos was on the show July 30, 2014 to discuss her new film "Rich Hill." She's a fan of T.S. Eliot and Dr. Seuss. Find out what else she's a fan of!

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The 'Infidels' and 'Atheists' Who Founded America

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

America’s foundersnot only Thomas Jefferson and Ben Franklin, but Thomas Paine, Ethan Allen, and Thomas Young, the forgotten Founder who kicked off the Boston Tea Party—were called as “infidels” and “atheists” in their own time. The ideas that inspired them were largely ancient, pagan, and continental. Matthew Stewart looks at the philosophical ideas that inspired America’s revolutionaries. His book Nature's God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic, uncovers the true meanings of “Nature’s God,” “self-evident,” and many other phrases crucial to our understanding of the American experiment.

 

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'Rich Hill' Examines the Lives of Boys Growing Up in Rural America

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Producer and director Tracy Droz Tragos discusses her documentary “Rich Hill,” an account of a year in the life of three teenagers growing up in Rich Hill, Missouri, a struggling rural town. The teenage boys are like millions of others coming of age around the world, but they're faced with challenges like with an imprisoned mother, isolation, instability, and unemployed parents. She’s joined by Andrew Jewell, one of the boys in the film. "Rich Hill," examines the challenges, hopes and dreams of rural America’s youth. It opens August 8 at the Village East Cinema, as well as on VOD. Find out more information on the film's website

 

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Brando Skyhorse Unravels His Past in Search of the Truth

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Growing up, Brando Skyhorse was told that his father was an American Indian in prison for armed robbery. It was a new identity, dreamed up by his mother, Maria, and it would be over 30 years before Skyhorse began to untangle the truth of his own past and discover who his biological father really was. He tells the complicated story in his memoir, Take This Man.

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Hopes and Dreams, Challenges and Lies

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, reveals what President Nixon knew and when he knew it, and what happened during that mysterious 18 1/2 minute gap. When he was growing up, Brando Skyhorse was told that his father was an American Indian—but as he reveals in a new memoir, the situation is a lot more complicated. Tracy Droz Tragos discusses her award-winning documentary “Rich Hill,” about boys growing up in a struggling rural town in Missouri. She’s joined by one of the teenagers she profiles in the film. Plus, a look into the philosophical ideas that inspired America’s revolutionaries--from Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Young, who started the Boston Tea Party.

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What Did Nixon Know and When Did He Know It?

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

What did President Nixon know and when did he know it? Former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, draws on his own transcripts of almost a thousand conversations, a wealth of Nixon’s secretly recorded information, and more than 150,000 pages of documents in the National Archives and the Nixon Library to provide the definitive answer to that question. In his book The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It, Dean reveals why and how the Watergate break-in happened, what was on the mysterious 18 1/2 minute gap in Nixon’s recordings, and looks at how Watergate forever changed American politics.

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Maggie Gyllenhaal's New Role Blends the Personal and Political

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Maggie Gyllenhaal discusses her role in the new SundanceTV miniseries “The Honorable Woman,”  about Nessa Stein, whose father was a Zionist arms procurer who was assassinated. Years later, after inheriting her father’s company, Nessa changes its purpose from supplying arms to laying data cabling networks between Israel and the West Bank, promoting peace and communication. Her work earns her an appointment to the House of Lords. When a secret from her past threatens to be exposed, she realizes that those closest to her are potentially her most dangerous enemies. “The Honorable Woman” premieres July 31 at 10 pm on SundanceTV.

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