Streams

A Love Story on Death Row

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Damien Echols was just 18 years old when he was sentenced to death for a crime he didn’t commit. His case—that of the infamous “West Memphis Three”—was the subject of Joe Berlinger's documentary "Paradise Lost." Lorri Davis was a landscape architect living in New York City when she saw the film, and she couldn’t get Echols out of her head—so she wrote him a letter. Over the course of a 16-year correspondence, Echols and Davis grew to know each other, fall in love, and marry while he was still in prison.

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Gangster Whitey Bulger, Corruption, and the FBI

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Documentary filmmaker Joe Berlinger discusses his documentary “Whitey: United States of America v. James J. Bulger,” about the infamous South Boston gangster, whose legend captured the imagination of the entire country. He’s joined Hank Brennan, Whitey Bulger's attorney to talk about the trial and to explore corruption within the highest levels of law enforcement. Embedded for months with retired FBI agents, Massachusetts state police, victims, lawyers, gangsters, journalists, and federal prosecutors, Berlinger scrutinizes Bulger’s relationship with the FBI and Department of Justice—an interaction that allowed him to reign over a criminal empire for decades. "Whitey: United States of America v. James J. Bulger” opens June 27 at IFC Center.

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Zohydro and the Epidemic of Painkiller Abuse

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

In October the Food and Drug Administration approved the controversial long-acting painkiller Zohydro, a drug some doctors think the FDA should never have approved. It belongs to a class of drugs that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said has created a nationwide, doctor-driven epidemic of addiction, death, and immeasurable devastation. Stephen S. Hall, New York magazine contributing editor, talks about the drug and the controversy surrounding it in his article “How Much Does it Hurt?” in the June 9 issue of New York.

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Shrinkage at Walmart

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Investigative journalist Spencer Woodman reports about Walmart leadership encouraging store management to mask rates of "shrinkage," which is the value of goods stolen/otherwise lost, by manipulating inventory metrics—and thereby profit margins—through an array of improper and possibly illegal techniques. Woodman's article "Former Managers Allege Pervasive Inventory Fraud at Walmart. How Deep Does the Rot Go?" is in The Nation.

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A New Painkiller, a Crime Boss, a Love Story

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

On today’s show: We’ll learn about the controversial long-acting painkiller Zohydro, which is 10 times stronger than Vicodin and was approved by the FDA in October. Filmmaker Joe Berlinger talks about his new documentary about Whitey Bulger, and he’s joined by Bulger’s attorney. Damien Echols and Lorri Davis describe their 16-year-long correspondence—and how they fell in love and got married—while Echols was on death row for a crime he didn’t commit. And we'll look at how Walmart store managers were encouraged to hide the amount of merchandise that was stolen and damaged—and how that affected profit margins.

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What's Going on Inside the Toddler Brain

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Child psychologist and director of the Barnard Center for Toddler Development Dr. Tovah P. Klein reveals what parents can do to help their toddler grow into a fulfilled child and adult, and she discusses new science that shows that resilience, self-reliance, self-regulation, and empathy are more critical to success than simple intelligence. She also explains what’s behind tantrums and fights over bedtime and why “toddlers are the opposite of civilized human beings.” 

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Digging Together: NYC's Community Gardens

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

There are more than 600 community gardens throughout New York City, and we’ll discuss the history and the future of community gardening here. We’re joined by Paula Segal, Executive Director of  596 Acres, a non-profit group that helps people identify vacant land in their neighborhoods, and turn them into gardens; Aziz Dehkan, Executive Director of  the NYC Community Garden Coalition; and Steve Frillman, Executive Director of Green Guerillas, who started some of the very first community gardens in the city. They'll also take calls about how to start a community garden in the city.

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Murder, Mayhem, and the Invention of The Great Gatsby

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

The autumn of 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald returned to New York for the publication of his fourth book, Tales of the Jazz Age. The Fitzgeralds’ arrival coincided with another event: the discovery of a brutal double murder in nearby New Jersey, a crime made all the more horrible by the police investigation—which failed to accomplish anything beyond generating enormous publicity for the newfound celebrity participants. The Mills-Hall murder has been wholly forgotten today, but the enormous impact of this bizarre crime can still be seen in The Great Gatsby. Sarah Churchwell combines a forensic search for clues to an unsolved crime and an examination of the roots of America’s best loved novel in her book Careless People: Murder, Mayhem, and the Invention of The Great Gatsby.

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Tom Rachman's New Novel, The Rise and Fall of Great Powers

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Tom Rachman talks about his new novel, The Rise and Fall of Great Powers, about a young woman who travels the world to make sense of her puzzling past. Taken from home as a girl, Tooly Zylberberg found herself spirited away by a group of seductive outsiders, implicated in capers from Asia to Europe to the United States. But who were her abductors? Why did they take her? What did they really want?

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Sowing Seeds: Raising Toddlers and Community Gardens

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

On today’s show: Child psychologist Dr. Tovah P. Klein explains why the toddler years are crucial for a child’s development and what parents can do to help their kids—and themselves—thrive. Then, find out about the 1922 double murder in New Jersey that loomed large in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s mind as he wrote The Great Gatsby. Tom Rachman talks about his new novel, The Rise and Fall of Great Powers. And we’ll take a look at the past, present, and future of community gardens in New York City.

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Big Blue on the Brink

Monday, June 16, 2014

The company IBM has a history dating back to the 19th century. It has been one of the most powerful information technology companies in the world, but the last 20 years have been rocky. Robert Cringely discusses how IBM fell from grace, where it is headed, and what can be done to save the company. He's the author of The Decline and Fall of IBM: End of an American Icon? 

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James Joyce's Ulysses: 'Obscene, Lewd, and Lascivious'

Monday, June 16, 2014

The book that literary critics now consider the most important novel in the English language was once illegal to own, sell, advertise or purchase in most of the English-speaking world. James Joyce’s Ulysses ushered in the modernist era and changed the novel forever, but when it was first published, the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice immediately banned it as “obscene, lewd, and lascivious.” Literary historian Kevin Birmingham tells the story of Ulysses, from Joyce’s initial inspiration in 1904 to its landmark federal obscenity trial in 1933. The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce's Ulysses recounts how Joyce and some of the most important publishers and writers of his era, had to fight for years to win the freedom to publish Ulysses.

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Big Blue and the Big Blue Book

Monday, June 16, 2014

IBM was once the leader in technology and innovation, and Robert Cringely explains how it has been eclipsed by companies like Apple and predicts what Big Blue’s future may be. We'll look at how James Joyce’s Ulysses not only changed the novel, but was also banned and deemed “obscene.” Lisa See talks about her novel, China Dolls. Gerald Felix Warburg looks back at his four decades behind the scenes of Washington politics.

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China Dolls, a Novel by Lisa See

Monday, June 16, 2014

Lisa See talks about her novel China Dolls. It’s set in 1938 in San Francisco as a world’s fair is about to open on Treasure Island and a war is brewing overseas. Grace, Helen, and Ruby, three young women from very different backgrounds, meet by chance at the exclusive and glamorous nightclub and become fast friends, relying on each other through unexpected challenges and shifting fortunes. 

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A Political Education from the Nixon Years to the Age of Obama

Monday, June 16, 2014

Gerald Felix Warburg recounts his four decades inside Washington politics—working to reform nuclear energy, strategic arms control, and foreign policy. He discusses the challenges of how to maintain principles while cutting deals, and how to balance public purpose with private interests. Warburg's memoir Dispatches from the Eastern Front: A Political Education from the Nixon Years to the Age of Obama is an insider's account of what goes on in the U.S. Capitol—from the inner circles of presidential campaigns to the firms where well-paid lobbyists use their expertise to advance the interests of corporations and NGOs. 

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Advice for Giving and Getting Advice

Friday, June 13, 2014

Advice is usually well-intentioned but sometimes it’s unwelcome or even unhelpful. Philip Galanes, New York Times Social Q’s columnist, talks about when and how to share your pearls of wisdom and how to handle receiving advice you don’t want or need. Galanes is the author of author of Social Q's: How to Survive the Quirks, Quandaries and Quagmires of Today. Share your question or story below!

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The Buzz about Mosquitoes: How They Find You and Why They Bite You

Friday, June 13, 2014

Mosquitoes are one of the downsides of summer. They bite and buzz and they carry infections, including malaria, dengue fever, and, in this area, West Nile virus. On this week's Please Explain, Anandasankar Ray, associate professor, Department of Entomology and Center for Disease Vector Research at the University of California Riverside, and Phil Lounibos of the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory at the University of Florida, Vero Beach tell us all about mosquitoes.

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Give and Take

Friday, June 13, 2014

New York Times Social Q’s columnist Philip Galanes shares his tips for giving and getting advice. Then, Lily Rabe and Hamish Linklater discuss starring in “Much Ado About Nothing,” this year’s first Shakespeare in the Park production. Jan Maxwell and playwright Tony Giardina talk about “The City of Conversation,” about a political hostess in the waning days of the Carter Administration. And this week’s Please Explain is all about mosquitos!

 

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Shakespeare in the Park's “Much Ado About Nothing”

Friday, June 13, 2014

Lily Rabe and Hamish Linklater discuss playing the wise-cracking would-be lovers Beatrice and Benedick in “Much Ado About Nothing,” the Public Theater's first Shakespeare in the Park production of the summer. It's playing at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park through July 6.

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“The City of Conversation” at Lincoln Center Theater

Friday, June 13, 2014

Tony Giardina talks about his new play “The City of Conversation,” along with Jan Maxwell, who stars in it. Maxwell plays political hostess Hester Ferris, a mover and shaker in the nation’s capital, and the play is about the political gains and personal losses that her choices inflict on her family from the waning days of the Carter administration to the beginning of the Obama presidency. “The City of Conversation” is playing at the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater at Lincoln Center through July 26.

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