Streams

Why Great White Sharks Are Making a Comeback in NY and NJ

Thursday, July 17, 2014

After decades of decline, the population of great white sharks off the coast of New York and New Jersey is making a comeback. Researchers are even beginning to wonder if there may be a white shark nursery in the area. N.O.A.A. shark researcher Tobey Curtis joins us to explain why the population is making a comeback and why more white sharks is a good thing for the environment.

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Michel Gondry and Audrey Tautou on the Surreal Romance, “Mood Indigo”

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Director Michel Gondry and actress Audrey Tautou discuss the new movie “Mood Indigo.” It’s an imaginative romance based on the novel of the same name by Boris Vian, and tells the story of Colin, a wealthy young inventor, who is looking for love. With the help of his cook Nicolas and best friend, he meets, and marries, Chloe. But after their wedding, Chloe falls ill, and Colin resorts to increasingly desperate methods to save her life. “Mood Indigo” opens at the Landmark Sunshine Cinema July 18.

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The War That Gave Us 'Cooties'

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

World War I began 100 years ago, and our word maven, Patricia T. O’Conner, looks at the words that came out of that war—like blimp, doughboy, cooties. She’ll also answer questions about language and grammar. An updated and expanded third edition of O’Conner’s book, Woe is I: The Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English in Plain English, is available in paperback, as is  Origins of the Specious, written with Stewart Kellerman.

If you have a question about language and grammar, leave a comment or call us at 212-433-9692!

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There's Nothing Gross about Eating Your Kids' Chewed-up Meatloaf

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Dan Pashman, host of the podcast The Sporkful, and Hillary Frank, host of The Longest Shortest Time podcast, share tips on eating with kids and how to raise adventurous eaters. They offer advice on how parents who want a decent meal can cope with difficult kids who won’t eat, the hierarchy of your kids' leftover foods, as well as techniques for eating those leftovers.

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Tribute: James MacGregor Burns

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

James MacGregor Burns was one of our country’s most important political historians. He won the Pulitzer for his book on Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1970, and spent his life writing about the nature of leadership in general, and the presidency in particular. He died at the age of 95. But you can still hear Leonard’s interview with him from 2003.

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The Statue of Liberty Was One Man's Quixotic Pet Project

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The Statue of Liberty is one of the most recognizable monuments in the world, a symbol of freedom and the American dream. For decades, the myth has persisted that the statue was a grand gift from France, but Elizabeth Mitchell reveals that the Statue of Liberty was in fact the pet project of one quixotic and visionary French sculptor, Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi. Bartholdi not only forged this 151-foot-tall colossus in a workshop in Paris and transported her across the ocean. Mitchell tells the story of the statue in Liberty's Torch: The Great Adventure to Build the Statue of Liberty.

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Five Men Fled the French Revolution - and Ended Up Shaping America

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

In 1789, as the French Revolution shook Europe, the new United States was struggling for survival in the face of financial insolvency and bitter political and regional divisions. Five Frenchmen who’d been among the leaders of the French Revolution sought refuge in America, a country they idealized because it seemed to be an embodiment of the Enlightenment ideals they celebrated. Francois Furstenberg writes about the Frenchmen’s American adventures, as they adapted to American life and eventually became enmeshed in Franco-American diplomacy. His book When the United States Spoke French: Five Refugees Who Shaped a Nation explores the tumultuous first years of the United States and looks at how these men helped shape American history. 

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Growing Good Eaters

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Dan Pashman, host of “The Sporkful,” and Hillary Frank, host of “The Longest Shortest Time,” share tips on what to feed kids and how to raise adventurous eaters. We’ll learn about the adventures of five Frenchmen who sought refuge in America during the French Revolution, and the ways they helped shape American history. Elizabeth Mitchell tells the story of the visionary French sculptor who designed the Statue of Liberty and brought it to New York. Plus, our word maven Patricia T. O’Conner talks about words from WWI and she answers listener questions about language and grammar!

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Questions for Akhil Sharma

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

What are some of your favorite books/who are some of your favorite authors?

The writer who has been most important to me is Ernest Hemingway, in particular his short stories and the two masterpieces: The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms. At one point I had read him so closely that he was my ideal of what writing has to be to be good.

The current writers I am reading avidly to see what I can learn are Lorrie Moore and Tobias Wolff. They are both extraordinary writers. Also, when you read them, you begin to get a sense of the writer's personality and in their personalities, in how they respond to situations with both laughter and seriousness, there appear to be solutions as to how to live one's life.

The writer that I think everybody should read is Joseph Roth. This great Austro Hungarian writer has a style that is ironic like Flaubert and yet with a direct moral engagement like Tolstoy. I especially recommend Radetzky March and The Tale of the 1102nd Night

What have you read or watched lately that you were moved or inspired by?

I am reading Eugene Oenegin by Pushkin again and his language is both plain and plastic and this is infecting my writing to a tremendous extent. Reading him I begin to see that what we mean by consistency of style can sometimes be a lack of conviction that the reader will follow along.

Do you have favorite words? Least favorite words? What are they and why?

There are words that I feel my characters overuse: shame, belly, sadness. I say that they overuse them, but their lives are difficult and they are working through things.

The words that I wished I had more often in my writing are: cheerful, laughing, kind, teased. 

 I want to have more of these words in my writing because I think these words would add to the complications and richness of the worlds that I create.

Do you have writing rituals? Where and when and how do you write?

I write with a stopwatch. If a phone call comes I stop my stopwatch. If I check my email I stop my stopwatch. The idea is to keep myself honest so that I know how much work I actually did in any single day.

I have a desk in my apartment which is crowded with all sorts of books and scraps of paper. When I was working on my novel, drafts of my novel sat on the floor around me.

Every time a project is over I clean my desk and the relief is like getting a very short haircut in the summer. 

 

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Guest Picks: Ken Griffey, Sr.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Ken Griffey, Sr. was on the Lopate Show to talk about his new memoir Big Red: Baseball, Fatherhood, and My Life in the Big Red Machine. When he's not writing or talking about baseball, he's reading the Bourne series. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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A New Play on Family, Politics, and Writing a Novel as a Pakistani-American Woman

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Ayad Akhtar talks about his new play, "The Who & the What." He's joined by Nadine Malouf and Bernard White, who star in the play, which tells the story of Zarina, a brilliant and outspoken Pakistani-American writer, who goes to great lengths to please her family. But when her father and sister read the manuscript of a novel Zarina is writing about women and Islam, a confrontation threatens to tear their family apart. "The Who and the What" is playing at Lincoln Center Theater through July 27.

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Ken Griffey, Sr., and the Big Red Machine

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Ken Griffey, Sr., reflects on his 19-year major league career, which began just after high school. He was an outfielder, scout, coach, and manager, and raised two professional ballplayers. His memoir is Big Red: Baseball, Fatherhood, and My Life in the Big Red Machine

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Looking for Riches in All the Wrong Places

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Gus Kaikkonen discusses translating and directing Jules Romains' comedy "Donogoo" at the Mint. He's joined by scenic designer Roger Hanna. "Donogoo" tells the story of Le Trouhadec, a professor of geography who unwittingly sets in motion a stock market swindle of global proportions. Investors, pioneers and prospectors alike are driven to seek their fortune in Donogoo, a place that doesn't exist—or does it? "Donogoo" is playing at the Mint Theater through July 27.

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The Miami Clinic Behind the Alex Rodriguez Steroid Scandal

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Investigative reporters Tim Elfrink and Gus Garcia-Roberts uncover the darker side of competitive sports—the use of illegal performance enhancing drugs. Elfrink raised the alarm when he broke the story that a Miami clinic called Biogenesis had been supplying performance enhancing drugs to players, including Alex Rodriguez, the highest-earning player in the game. In Blood Sport: Alex Rodriguez, Biogenesis, and the Quest to End Baseball's Steroid Era, Elfrink and Roberts give an account of unraveling the story, with incredible details about tanning salon robberies, coded text messages, and furtive steroid injections in the men’s room.

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Baseball’s Heroes and Villains

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Ken Griffey, Sr., reflects on his 19-year major league career as player, scout, coach, manager…and the father of two professional ballplayers. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Ayad Akhtar on his latest work, “The Who & the What.” He’ll be joined by Nadine Malouf and Bernard White, who star in it. We’ll discuss a new production of Jules Romains’ dark comedy “Donogoo” with the director and translator Gus Kaikkonen and scenic designer Roger Hanna. Investigative reporters Tim Elfrink and Gus Garcia-Roberts discuss the scandals, hearings, suspensions, and repercussions of the use of illegal performance enhancing drugs in baseball.

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The Noise from a Secret Navy Program Was So Awful, Whales Beached Themselves

Monday, July 14, 2014

Joshua Horwitz tells the story of a crusading attorney who stumbles on one of the US Navy’s best-kept secrets: a submarine detection system that floods entire ocean basins with high-intensity sound—and drives whales to strand themselves on beaches. The attorney launches a legal battle to expose and stop the Navy program. In his book War of the Whales: A True Story, Horwitz writes about how underwater noise is affecting whales and other sea life, and the confrontation over the Navy program that harms whales.

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Why a 'Rich Man’s Game' Is Catching on in China

Monday, July 14, 2014

Statistically, zero percent of the Chinese population plays golf, which is known as the "rich man’s game" and is considered taboo. Yet China is in the midst of a golf boom — hundreds of new courses have opened in the past decade, despite it being illegal to build them. Dan Washburn charts the growing popularity of the sport in China and how it's shaping Chinese culture. He follows three men intimately involved in China's bizarre golf scene in The Forbidden Game: Golf and the Chinese Dream.

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Tribute: Lorin Maazel

Monday, July 14, 2014

The internationally renowned Lorin Maazel started at the podium quite young: he had been invited by Arturo Toscanini to conduct the NBC Symphony at the age of seven, and by 15, was leading several of the most important American orchestras. During his career, he conducted over 150 orchestras (including the New York Philharmonic and the Cleveland Orchestra), and at least 5,000 opera and concert performances. He died at the age of 84 in Virginia, where he had been rehearsing the annual Castleton Festival, which he had founded. You can hear his interview with Leonard from 2009 about his rich, musical career.

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Tribute: Charlie Haden

Monday, July 14, 2014

Time magazine described Charlie Haden as "one of the most restless, gifted and intrepid players in all of jazz." The multiple Grammy-winning bassist was a member of the revolutionary Ornette Coleman Quartet, and he continued to push the boundaries of jazz for over 5 decades. He contracted polio at the age of 15, and in 2010 developed post-polio syndrome. He was on the Leonard Lopate Show in 2004, when his album “Land of the Sun” had been released. 

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Tribute: Nadine Gordimer

Monday, July 14, 2014

Nadine Gordimer would say, “I am not a political person by nature. I don’t suppose if I had lived elsewhere, my writing would have reflected politics much, if at all.” But the South African novelist could not ignore the fabric of apartheid in her fiction. And the daughter of a watchmaker would come to win a Nobel Prize, in honor of her work. She died at the age of 90 in Johannesburg. And you can hear her interview with Leonard from 2002.

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