Streams

As More Governments Seek To Control Information, The Lives of Journalists Are Increasingly At Risk

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Journalists are being imprisoned and killed in record numbers. In 2014, 42 have been killed—not just covering conflicts in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Ukraine, but covering politics, corruption, and human rights around the world. Joel Simon, the executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, discusses threats by authoritarian governments, militants, criminals, and terrorists, who all seek to use technology, political pressure, and violence. In The New Censorship: Inside the Global Battle for Media Freedom, Simon warns that these threats are leading to a shortage of the news reports we need to make sense of our globalized world and to fight against human rights abuses, manage conflict, and promote accountability.

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Vocalist Sheila Jordan's 70 Years in Jazz

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Sheila Jordan tells how she went from poverty in Pennsylvania's coal-mining country to success as a jazz vocalist.
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How an American Company Supported War Criminal Charles Taylor in Liberia

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

ProPublica reporter T. Christian Miller and Frontline producer Marcela Gaviria investigate the ways the American tire company Firestone funded Liberian warlord Charles Taylor.
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Firestone in Liberia, Khruschev in America

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

How the tire company Firestone funded Liberian warlord Charles Taylor. Jazz singer Sheila Jordan. Nikita Khruschev in America. How trial courts work and why they're important.
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Khrushchev Eats a Hot Dog and Why History Is Sometimes Comedy

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Director Robert Stone and historian William Taubman talk about the documentary “Cold War Roadshow,”about Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev's 1959 visit to America.
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America's Influential Trial Court and the Evolution of the Justice System

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

James Zirin discusses the history of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York and the important cases decided there.
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Video: Alice McDermott on Santa Fe, Nabokov, "Parlor floor and basement"

Monday, November 17, 2014

Alice McDermott talked about why she loves Nabokov, why Santa Fe makes her think of Willa Cather, and writing fictional diaries.
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Penelope Fitzgerald Began Her Esteemed Writing Career at Sixty

Monday, November 17, 2014

Penelope Fitzgerald grew up in a provincial English childhood in the village of Hampstead, was known as a "blond bombshell" at Oxford, and struggled for years raising children in an impoverished household. Her writing career did not begin until she was nearly 60, yet she went on to win some of the most coveted awards in literature—the Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Hermione Lee traces Fitzegerald's complicated story in her new book Penelope Fitzgerald: A Life.

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Rabih Alameddine Explores The Power of Literature and Art Among Tragedy

Monday, November 17, 2014

In Rabih Alameddine’s new novel An Unnecessary Woman, the cranky yet charming septuagenarian protagonist, Aaliya muses over literature, philosophy, and art, yet her memories are invaded by the Lebanese Civil War and her volatile past. A late-life crisis ensues as she is faced with an unthinkable disaster that threatens to shatter the little life she has left.

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In Alabama, A Judge Can "Override" A Jury's Decision to Not Impose The Death Penalty

Monday, November 17, 2014

Alabama condemns more people to death, per capita, than any other state, and it is one of three states in the country with a judicial-override law, allowing a judge to "override" a jury's decision not to impose the death penalty. In Florida and Delaware, the two other states with the provision, judges use the prerogative very sparingly, and when they do it’s almost always to convert death sentences to life. But unlike Florida and Delaware, Alabama holds partisan elections for judgeships, and judges aim to be seen as tough on crime. In "Double Jeopardy," New Yorker contributor Paige Williams investigates this phenomenon and explores the story of Shonelle Jackson, a death-row inmate trying to overturn the override decision made against him in spite of a jury’s unanimous rejection of the death penalty. The article appears in the November 17 issue of The New Yorker. 

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Can America Win the War, or the Peace, in Afghanistan?

Monday, November 17, 2014

Acclaimed war correspondent Jack Fairweather discusses America's failures in Afghanistan. In Penelope Fitzgerald: A Life, Hermione Lee traces Penelope Fitzgerald’s complicated life and late writing career. Rabih Alameddine’s new novel is a portrait of one reclusive woman’s late-life crisis. Paige Williams investigates how judges in Alabama impose the death penalty on murderers, even when the jury votes against the death penalty. 

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The Good War that Went Bad: Why America Won't Win the War or Peace in Afghanistan

Monday, November 17, 2014

The American led war in Afghanistan was known as "the good war," and at the start, it appeared to be a triumph, especially compared to the war in Iraq. Yet there have been mounting casualties and escalating costs, a corrupt government, rampant bribery and instability. The outcomes of the war will be based on the realities on the ground in Afghanistan, not the goals of American politicians, argues Jack Fairweather in his new book The Good War: Why We Couldn’t Win the War or the Peace in Afghanistan. The book is the first full narrative history of the war in Afghanistan, from its inception after 9/11 to the drawdown in 2014. 

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Leonard Lopate Weekend: Chef Marcus Samuelsson, Sci-Fi Writer William Gibson & Controversial Cartoons

Friday, November 14, 2014

This week: cooking at home with chef Marcus Samuelsson (first). Then, author William Gibson talks about his new science-fiction novel The Peripheral (17:40). Plus, Danish journalist Flemming Rose talks about how his decision to print cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad in 2005 set off a global firestorm (32:46).

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Will The Internet Remain Accessible to All?

Friday, November 14, 2014

On November 10, President Obama posted a video and statement on the White House website, urging the FCC to protect Net Neutrality, which ensuring all internet traffic is treated equally  for everyone. The President stated that losing Net Neutrality could mean losing the internet as we know it. He asked the FCC to reclassify the internet a part of the communications law known as Title II, but FCC chairman Tom Wheeler is not sold on the idea. 

On this week's Please Explain, we discuss Net Neutrality, and how it affects everyone who uses the internet. Marvin Ammori is a lawyer who is best known for his work opposing SOPA and defending network neutrality. He is a 2014 Future Tense Fellow at the New America Foundation, has represented several companies and coalitions including Google, Dropbox, eBay, Automattic, Tumblr, Twitter, and others. He recently authored the book On Internet FreedomMichal Rosenn is Deputy General Counsel at Kickstarter, the leading funding platform for creative projects. She has served in that role since October 2012, advising the start-up on intellectual property, contractual, employment, corporate governance, and regulatory matters, among others.

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Uncovering The Truth: Nazis Protected by the U.S. Government, and the Complex Life of Nelson Rockefeller

Friday, November 14, 2014

Nazis in America. The life and political career of Nelson Rockefeller. “The Country House.” Net neutrality!
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Nelson Rockefeller: Iconic New York Governor, Face of Liberal Republicanism

Friday, November 14, 2014

A look at Nelson Rockefeller's improbable journey to the New York governor’s mansion, and how his personal life affected his political life.
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Longing to be Famous in 'The Country House'

Friday, November 14, 2014

Tony and Emmy winner Blythe Danner and Eric Lange discuss their roles in “The Country House.”  The play is about a brood of famous and longing-to-be-famous creative artists gathered at their Berkshires summer house during the Williamstown Theatre Festival. When the weekend takes an unexpected turn, it incites simmering jealousies, romantic outbursts, and passionate soul-searching. “The Country House”  is playing at the Manhattan Theater Company’s Samuel J. Friedman Theatre through November 23.

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How America Became a Safe Haven for Nazis after WWII

Friday, November 14, 2014

Investigative reporter Eric Lichtblau tells how some Nazis received help and protection from the U.S. government—and were hired by the CIA, FBI, and the military.
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Sex and Radio

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Comparing WFMU to commercial radio is like comparing Nat Geo to People magazine. WFMU is weird. It's provocative. And the new film "Sex and Broadcasting" covers the fight to save it.
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Banding Together to Save Small Farms

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Co-directors Lisa F. Jackson and Sarah Teale discuss their documentary “Grazers,” about t farmers in upstate New York who create a beef cooperative to hold on to their failing farms
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