Streams

From the Outside Looking In: Online Tracking, an Unconventional Politician, Staying Stubborn

Monday, June 23, 2014

On today’s show: ProPublica’s Julia Angwin explains how online marketers are gathering more of your offline data to create increasingly intrusive and targeted ads. Then Jón Gnarr explains how he went from launching a political party in order to satirize Iceland’s political system to being elected mayor of Reykjavík. We’ll find out how Detroit went from making cars to producing a bomber an hour during World War II. And constitutional law professor Richard H. Weisberg praises intransigence in an age of increasing flexibility.

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What Does 'Natural' Really Mean?

Friday, June 20, 2014

On this week’s Please Explain, Urvashi Rangan, director of the Consumer Safety and Sustainability Group for Consumer Reports, discusses the findings from Consumer Reports' new survey about food labels, and explains what terms like "natural," "fair trade," "genetically engineered," mean. She’ll explain the rules for what food labels can claim, how they can be misleading, what information is missing from labels, and efforts to reform food labels.

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10+ Tips for Easy Summer Meals

Friday, June 20, 2014

The summer is heating up—you’re busy, hot, and probably don’t want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen. New York Times Dining Section columnist and cookbook writer Melissa Clark has lots of ideas for easy summer meals. Plus, she's shared 3 recipes that are great for the hot weather!

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What It's Like to Spend a Month Standing Up

Friday, June 20, 2014

Sitting down for hours at a time, which many people do every day—at work, in the car, on the couch in front of the television—is bad for our health. Dan Kois, senior editor at Slate; co-host of Slate's parenting podcast, Mom & Dad Are Fighting; and New York magazine contributor, talks about standing up for a month straight. He wrote about the experience—and how it made his calves and kids unhappy—in "Sitting Is Bad for You. So I Stopped. For a Whole Month" in the June 9 issue of New York magazine.

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Linda Emond and Danny Burstein in "Cabaret"

Friday, June 20, 2014

Linda Emond and Danny Burstein discuss their Tony-nominated roles as Fraulein Schneider and Herr Schultz in Roundabout Theatre Company's Broadway revival of "Cabaret." It's playing at Studio 54.

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Recipe: Melissa Clark's Seared Wild Salmon with Brown Butter Cucumbers

Friday, June 20, 2014

Makes 2 servings

 

2 thick, wild salmon fillets (6- to 8-ounce each)

Kosher salt, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 Kirby cucumbers, peeled and diced into 1/4-inch cubes

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil or mint

1 teaspoon fresh lime juice, more to taste

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Recipe: Melissa Clark's Grilled Sugar Snap Peas with Feta and Mint

Friday, June 20, 2014

Serves 6

2 pounds sugar snap peas, trimmed

2 tablespoons olive oil, more for drizzling

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, as needed

2/3 cup crumbled feta cheese

1/2 cup fresh mint leaves, torn

 

1. Light or preheat your grill. Oil a vegetable grill basket.

2. Toss peas with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Place in the prepared grill basket and grill over direct heat until the peas brown at the edges, 2 to 4 minutes per side.

3. Place peas on a platter and sprinkle with feta and mint. Drizzle with more olive oil before serving.

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Recipe: Melissa Clark's Summer Squash and Red Onion Salad with Pine Nuts

Friday, June 20, 2014

Serves 4

1 small red spring onion or 2 red scallions, thinly sliced

1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

3 summer squash or zucchini (about 2/3 pound), trimmed

1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt, more to taste

4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 cup toasted pine nuts

1 tablespoon chopped basil leaves

Freshly ground black pepper

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On Your Feet and in the Kitchen

Friday, June 20, 2014

Now that the hot weather is here, New York Times food columnist Melissa Clark shares her ideas for quick and easy summer meals. Linda Emond and Danny Burstein discuss their Tony-nominated performances in “Cabaret.” With more and more evidence emerging that sitting all day long is bad for our health, Dan Kois talks about the month he spent standing up. And this week’s Please Explain is all about food labels—what they tell you, what they don’t, and the efforts to make them clearer.

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Parks, Maps, Education, and Human Rights

Thursday, June 19, 2014

On today’s show: Michael S. Roth, the president of Wesleyan University, defends the value of a liberal education in today’s world. We’ll take a look inside the cut-throat business of antiquarian map collecting and a startling criminal case of theft. Find out how Frederick Law Olmsted virtually created the field of landscape architecture. And we’ll talk about some films at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival—a look at the Abiola family and their role in Nigeria’s independence, and a series of documentaries smuggled out of war-torn Syria that reveal the chaos its people are forced to live in.

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Wesleyan University President Champions Liberal Education

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Contentious debates over the benefits—or drawbacks—of a liberal education go back to Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson. Critics have attacked its irrelevance and elitism, supporters believe that nurturing a student’s capacity for lifelong learning is essential for science, commerce, and democracy. Wesleyan University President Michael S. Roth explores America’s long-running argument over vocational vs. liberal education. In Beyond the University: Why Liberal Education Matters he looks at the state of higher education today and argues that since the beginning of the nation, liberal education has cultivated individual freedom, supported civic virtue, and instilled hope for the future.

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The Map Thief

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Maps are both beautiful works of art and practical tools to navigate the world. They’re also highly collectible, and the map trade can be a cutthroat business. Once considered a respectable antiquarian map dealer, E. Forbes Smiley spent years doubling as a map thief—until he was finally arrested slipping maps out of books in the Yale University library. In his book The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps, Michael Blanding tells the history of this fascinating high-stakes criminal and the industry that consumed him.

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“The Supreme Price,” the Abiola Family, and Politics in Nigeria

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Director Joanna Lipper talks about her documentary “The Supreme Price,” along with the subject of the film, Hafsat Abiola, daughter of human rights heroine Kudirat Abiola, and Nigeria's President-elect M.K.O. Abiola, who won a historic vote in 1993 that promised to end years of military dictatorship. M.K.O. Abiola's victory was annulled and he was arrested. “The Supreme Price” is a political thriller about the Abiola family and Nigeria's evolution from independence in 1960 to present-day civilian rule. Hafsat discusses her fight against government corruption and her work as an advocate for the rights of women in Nigeria. “The Supreme Price” is screening Thursday, June 19, 9:15 pm, at Film Society of Lincoln Center, as part of the Human Rights Watch Film Festival.

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Emergency Cinema in Syria

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Andrea Holley, deputy director of the Human Rights Watch Film Festival, discusses “emergency cinema” in Syria with Charif Kiwan, producer and spokesperson for the Abounaddara Collective, whose short films will be shown at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival. Founded in 2010, the Abounaddara Collective is a group of filmmakers working to provide a different image of Syrian society from what's represented in the mainstream media. Since April 2011, the collective has produced one short film every week, working in a state of emergency. Abounaddara Collective shorts will be screening Thursday, June 19, 7:00 pm, at IFC Center, as part of the Human Rights Watch Film Festival.

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Frederick Law Olmsted Made Parks an Essential Part of American Life

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Frederick Law Olmsted was among the first to raise landscape architecture to a profession and a fine art. He was co-designer of Central Park, head of the first Yosemite commission, leader of the campaign to protect Niagara Falls, designer of the U.S. Capitol Grounds, site planner for the Great White City of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, planner of Boston’s “Emerald Necklace” of green space, and created park systems in many other cities. Olmsted believed a park was both a work of art and a necessity for urban life. Lawrence Hott discusses his documentary "Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing America," about Olmsted’s efforts to preserve nature and create an “environmental ethic” decades before the environmental movement. "Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing America" premieres Friday, June 20, on PBS—it airs at 10:30 on Channel 13 in New York.

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A Love Story on Death Row

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Damien Echols was just 18 years old when he was sentenced to death for a crime he didn’t commit. His case—that of the infamous “West Memphis Three”—was the subject of Joe Berlinger's documentary "Paradise Lost." Lorri Davis was a landscape architect living in New York City when she saw the film, and she couldn’t get Echols out of her head—so she wrote him a letter. Over the course of a 16-year correspondence, Echols and Davis grew to know each other, fall in love, and marry while he was still in prison.

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Gangster Whitey Bulger, Corruption, and the FBI

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Documentary filmmaker Joe Berlinger discusses his documentary “Whitey: United States of America v. James J. Bulger,” about the infamous South Boston gangster, whose legend captured the imagination of the entire country. He’s joined Hank Brennan, Whitey Bulger's attorney to talk about the trial and to explore corruption within the highest levels of law enforcement. Embedded for months with retired FBI agents, Massachusetts state police, victims, lawyers, gangsters, journalists, and federal prosecutors, Berlinger scrutinizes Bulger’s relationship with the FBI and Department of Justice—an interaction that allowed him to reign over a criminal empire for decades. "Whitey: United States of America v. James J. Bulger” opens June 27 at IFC Center.

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Zohydro and the Epidemic of Painkiller Abuse

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

In October the Food and Drug Administration approved the controversial long-acting painkiller Zohydro, a drug some doctors think the FDA should never have approved. It belongs to a class of drugs that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said has created a nationwide, doctor-driven epidemic of addiction, death, and immeasurable devastation. Stephen S. Hall, New York magazine contributing editor, talks about the drug and the controversy surrounding it in his article “How Much Does it Hurt?” in the June 9 issue of New York.

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Shrinkage at Walmart

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Investigative journalist Spencer Woodman reports about Walmart leadership encouraging store management to mask rates of "shrinkage," which is the value of goods stolen/otherwise lost, by manipulating inventory metrics—and thereby profit margins—through an array of improper and possibly illegal techniques. Woodman's article "Former Managers Allege Pervasive Inventory Fraud at Walmart. How Deep Does the Rot Go?" is in The Nation.

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A New Painkiller, a Crime Boss, a Love Story

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

On today’s show: We’ll learn about the controversial long-acting painkiller Zohydro, which is 10 times stronger than Vicodin and was approved by the FDA in October. Filmmaker Joe Berlinger talks about his new documentary about Whitey Bulger, and he’s joined by Bulger’s attorney. Damien Echols and Lorri Davis describe their 16-year-long correspondence—and how they fell in love and got married—while Echols was on death row for a crime he didn’t commit. And we'll look at how Walmart store managers were encouraged to hide the amount of merchandise that was stolen and damaged—and how that affected profit margins.

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