Streams

Reinventing Classic Short Stories by Gogol, Thurber, Borges

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Rivka Galchen discusses her new collection of short stories, American Innovations. In one story, a young woman’s furniture walks out on her.  In another, the narrator feels compelled to deliver a takeout order that has incorrectly been phoned in to her. Many of the stories in this collection mirror stories by Borges, Gogol, and James Thurber.

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Guest Picks: Andrew Jewell

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Andrew Jewell, one of the subjects of the film "Rich Hill," was on the show July 30, 2014. He's a fan of Bob Marley. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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Guest Picks: Tracy Droz Tragos

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Tracy Droz Tragos was on the show July 30, 2014 to discuss her new film "Rich Hill." She's a fan of T.S. Eliot and Dr. Seuss. Find out what else she's a fan of!

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The 'Infidels' and 'Atheists' Who Founded America

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

America’s foundersnot only Thomas Jefferson and Ben Franklin, but Thomas Paine, Ethan Allen, and Thomas Young, the forgotten Founder who kicked off the Boston Tea Party—were called as “infidels” and “atheists” in their own time. The ideas that inspired them were largely ancient, pagan, and continental. Matthew Stewart looks at the philosophical ideas that inspired America’s revolutionaries. His book Nature's God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic, uncovers the true meanings of “Nature’s God,” “self-evident,” and many other phrases crucial to our understanding of the American experiment.

 

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'Rich Hill' Examines the Lives of Boys Growing Up in Rural America

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Producer and director Tracy Droz Tragos discusses her documentary “Rich Hill,” an account of a year in the life of three teenagers growing up in Rich Hill, Missouri, a struggling rural town. The teenage boys are like millions of others coming of age around the world, but they're faced with challenges like with an imprisoned mother, isolation, instability, and unemployed parents. She’s joined by Andrew Jewell, one of the boys in the film. "Rich Hill," examines the challenges, hopes and dreams of rural America’s youth. It opens August 8 at the Village East Cinema, as well as on VOD. Find out more information on the film's website

 

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Brando Skyhorse Unravels His Past in Search of the Truth

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Growing up, Brando Skyhorse was told that his father was an American Indian in prison for armed robbery. It was a new identity, dreamed up by his mother, Maria, and it would be over 30 years before Skyhorse began to untangle the truth of his own past and discover who his biological father really was. He tells the complicated story in his memoir, Take This Man.

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What Did Nixon Know and When Did He Know It?

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

What did President Nixon know and when did he know it? Former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, draws on his own transcripts of almost a thousand conversations, a wealth of Nixon’s secretly recorded information, and more than 150,000 pages of documents in the National Archives and the Nixon Library to provide the definitive answer to that question. In his book The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It, Dean reveals why and how the Watergate break-in happened, what was on the mysterious 18 1/2 minute gap in Nixon’s recordings, and looks at how Watergate forever changed American politics.

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Hopes and Dreams, Challenges and Lies

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Former White House Counsel John W. Dean, one of the last major surviving figures of Watergate, reveals what President Nixon knew and when he knew it, and what happened during that mysterious 18 1/2 minute gap. When he was growing up, Brando Skyhorse was told that his father was an American Indian—but as he reveals in a new memoir, the situation is a lot more complicated. Tracy Droz Tragos discusses her award-winning documentary “Rich Hill,” about boys growing up in a struggling rural town in Missouri. She’s joined by one of the teenagers she profiles in the film. Plus, a look into the philosophical ideas that inspired America’s revolutionaries--from Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Young, who started the Boston Tea Party.

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Maggie Gyllenhaal's New Role Blends the Personal and Political

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Maggie Gyllenhaal discusses her role in the new SundanceTV miniseries “The Honorable Woman,”  about Nessa Stein, whose father was a Zionist arms procurer who was assassinated. Years later, after inheriting her father’s company, Nessa changes its purpose from supplying arms to laying data cabling networks between Israel and the West Bank, promoting peace and communication. Her work earns her an appointment to the House of Lords. When a secret from her past threatens to be exposed, she realizes that those closest to her are potentially her most dangerous enemies. “The Honorable Woman” premieres July 31 at 10 pm on SundanceTV.

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Tribute: Margot Adler

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

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America’s Role in the Unfolding Chaos in Iraq

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Two-and-a-half years after the U.S. pulled all its troops out of Iraq—a conflict that is projected to cost America more than $2 trillion dollars—Iraq is once again in crisis, with Islamic extremists gaining ground and a civil war brewing. Michael Kirk talks about the situation, and traces the role of the United States in the country since the 2003 invasion. His new Frontline documentary, "Losing Iraq,"  premieres July 29 at 10 pm on PBS.

 

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America's Secret War Against the Soviets in Afghanistan

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

CIA and National Security Council veteran Bruce Riedel tells the story of America's secret war in Afghanistan and the defeat of the Soviet 40th Red Army in the war that proved to be the final battle of the Cold War. In What We Won: America's Secret War in Afghanistan, 1979-89, he writes of his experiences in the CIA's Operations Center when the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan on Christmas Eve 1979, and examines the United States’ response, initiated by Jimmy Carter and accelerated by Ronald Reagan.

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Entanglements in Iraq and Afghanistan

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

On today’s show: Sean Hemingway talks about his grandfather Ernest Hemingway’s novel The Sun Also Rises for the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club! CIA and National Security Council veteran Bruce Riedel tells the story of America's secret war in Afghanistan in the 1980s. Maggie Gyllenhaal tells us about her role in the new SundanceTV miniseries “The Honorable Woman,”  a drama about the volatile politics of the Middle East. Michael Kirk discusses his Frontline documentary, “Losing Iraq,” which traces the role the United States has played from the 2003 invasion to the current violence—exploring how and why Iraq is now coming undone.

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Seán Hemingway on The Sun Also Rises

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Ernest Hemingway's first novel, The Sun Also Rises, is the quintessential story of the Lost Generation. The story follows Lady Brett Ashley and Jake Barnes and their carousing friends from the nightclubs of 1920s Paris to the bull fights in Spain. It looks at the disillusionment of the post-World War I generation,  but, at its heart, the novel is about unrequited love. Ernest Hemingway’s grandson, Seán Hemingway, will be here to discuss a new edition of the novel—and the early drafts and notes that show the author’s process. 

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All About TLDR – the Internet, Shorter

Monday, July 28, 2014

PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman talk about On The Media’s TLDR podcast and blog and the kind of media issues it covers.

 

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The Spy Who Infiltrated NY’s Nazi Underground

Monday, July 28, 2014

From the time Adolf Hitler came into power in 1933, German spies were active in New York. As war began in Europe in 1939, a German-American was recruited by the Nazis to set up a radio transmitter and collect messages from spies to send back to Nazi spymasters. Peter Duffy tells us how this German-American, William G. Sebold, became the FBI’s first double agent, spearheading a covert mission to infiltrate New York’s Nazi underground in the days leading up to World War II—it was the most successful counterespionage operation in U.S. history. Duffy tells the story in his book, Double Agent: The First Hero of World War II and How the FBI Outwitted and Destroyed a Nazi Spy Ring. .

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Guest Picks: Alex Goldman

Monday, July 28, 2014

Alex Goldman and PJ Vogt from TLDR were on the show July 28, 2014 to talk about internet culture and the influence of social media. Alex Goldman is a fan of Peter Tosh. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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Guest Picks: PJ Vogt

Monday, July 28, 2014

PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman from TLDR were on the show July 28, 2014 to talk about internet culture and the influence of social media. PJ Vogt is a fan of apocalyptic detective fiction. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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Why Are So Many Americans Going Hungry?

Monday, July 28, 2014

One-sixth of people in the United States are food insecure. Tracie McMillan looks at the face of hunger in this country and why millions of working Americans are struggling to feed their families. She’s written the article “The New Face of Hunger,” in the August issue of National Geographic. It's part of National Geographic’s eight-month series The Future of Food: How to Feed Our Growing Planet, on issues of food security and sustainability and an examination of why people in the richest country on Earth are malnourished.

 

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Looking Back at the Crash of United Flight 232

Monday, July 28, 2014

Twenty five years ago, United Airlines Flight 232 slammed onto a runway in Iowa and burst into flames. Miraculously, 184 of 296 passengers lived. Laurence Gonzales, a commercial pilot, draws on interviews with hundreds of survivors, crew, and airport and rescue personnel, to tell the harrowing story of pilots flying a plane with no controls and flight attendants keeping their calm in the face of certain death. His book Flight 232: A Story of Disaster and Survival goes step by step through the research that reveals the flaw, smaller than a grain of rice, that brought down the aircraft.

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