Streams

Lighting Up the Screen: The Mystery Behind Star Power

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Certain actors and actresses light up the screen—and have undeniable star presence. James Harvey explores the mysteries of star presence in cinema, and he gives a personal account of the films that have changed his life. His book Watching Them Be: Star Presence on the Screen from Garbo to Balthazar analyzes performances by Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Bette Davis, John Wayne, Bergman and Charles Laughton, and directors such as Jean-Luc Godard, who celebrated star quality.

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Tribute: Paul Mazursky

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

 

Paul Mazursky wrote and directed big-hearted, funny films, including “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice,” “An Unmarried Woman,” “Harry and Tonto,” “Enemies: A Love Story,” and “Down and Out in Beverly Hills.” The five-time Oscar nominee received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame late last year. He died June 30, 2014, at the age of 84. He was on the Lopate Show in 2007, talking about his first retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

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Enduring Legacies: From The Wall Street Journal to Garbo

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

The Wall Street Journal began 125 years ago as a 4-page afternoon paper, and since then, it’s grown to cover every major financial center around the world and is published in 12 languages. We’ll speak with some of the Journal’s editors about the legacy and future of the paper. Playwright Sarah Treem talks about her play “When We Were Young and Unafraid;” she’s joined by Cherry Jones and Zoe Kazan, who star in it. We’ll explore the mysteries of “star presence” in cinema. And we’ll discuss the psychology and politics of child sexual abuse cases.

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The Wall Street Journal Turns 125

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

The Wall Street Journal began 125 years ago as a 4-page afternoon paper sold for two cents. Since then, it has grown to cover every major financial center around the world and is published in 12 languages. Deputy Editors-in-Chief Matt Murray and Rebecca Blumenstein, and Senior Deputy Managing Editor Michael Miller discuss the legacy—and the future—of The Wall Street Journal. In honor of the anniversary, the Journal has created a new interactive site, highlighting important stories and milestones from the paper's archives. You can see The Wall Street Journal's First Edition here

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Behind the Scenes with the Troupe Defying Europe's Last Dictatorship

Monday, July 07, 2014

Filmmaker Madeleine Sackler goes behind the scenes with the Belarus Free Theatre, the acclaimed performance troupe who defy Europe’s last remaining dictatorship by examining forbidden topics, such as sexual orientation, alcoholism, suicide and politics. Her film "Dangerous Acts Starring the Unstable Elements of Belarus" looks at the risks the troupe takes to continue to create art under threat of censorship and persecution. Sackler said she met members of the Belarus Free Theater in 2010, about 6 months before contested election results lead to a violent government crackdown.

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The Invisible Professionals Who Make the World Go Round

Monday, July 07, 2014

Fact-checkers, anesthesiologists, U.N. interpreters, structural engineers, and other professionals, are masters of their crafts but rarely get attention for their work behind the scenes. David Zweig takes us into the worlds of “invisibles”—top experts who do the quiet work behind the scenes of public successes. Zweig uncovers how these hidden professionals hide from the spotlight by mastering their craft in his book Invisibles: The Power of Anonymous Work in an Age of Relentless Self-Promotion.

 

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The Anatomy of a Wrongful Execution

Monday, July 07, 2014

In 1989, Texas executed Carlos DeLuna, a poor Hispanic man with childlike intelligence, for the murder a convenience store clerk. His execution passed unnoticed for years until a team of Columbia Law School faculty and students chose to investigate his case. They found that DeLuna almost certainly was innocent—and that another man named Carlos, who was well known to the police and prosecutors, committed the murder. Columbia law school professor James Liebman, and Andrew Markquart and Shawn Crowley, talk about the case and how faulty eyewitness testimony, poor legal representation, and prosecutorial misfeasance continue to put innocent people at risk of execution. They write about this case in The Wrong Carlos: Anatomy of a Wrongful Execution.

You can see crime-scene photos, court records, media records, and an interactive map at http://thewrongcarlos.net/.

 

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Fighting Against the System and Staying Invisible

Monday, July 07, 2014

We’ll find out how a Columbia Law School professor and a team of students uncovered evidence that a man who was executed was innocent. Filmmaker Madeleine Sackler talks about her documentary, “Dangerous Acts,” about a troupe of performance artists struggling to create art under the dictatorship in Belarus. Thomas Nazario describes what everyday life is like for the world’s poorest people. Plus, a look at fact-checkers, anesthesiologists, U.N. interpreters and other important professionals who are often invisible and anonymous.

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Living on a Dollar a Day

Monday, July 07, 2014

More than one billion people around the world live on a dollar a day. While the reasons for their poverty may be different across geographic regions and political circumstances, the results are much the same. Thomas Nazario looks at the ways extreme poverty severely limits people’s options in life, and that the cycle of poverty is nearly impossible to break without help. His book Living on a Dollar a Day shares the personal stories of some the poorest of the poor.

 

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Inequality, Indecency, and an Inside Look at The Mets

Thursday, July 03, 2014

Matt Taibbi talks about the intersection of two troubling trends in America today—growing income inequality and mass incarceration. Bob Saget takes us behind the scenes of “Full House” and “America’s Funniest Home Videos” and of his notoriously profane stand-up act. AJ Mass, who’s a former Mr. Met, takes us into the sweaty world of sports mascots. And the legendary Mookie Wilson looks back at the 1986 World Series and what it was like being part of the Amazin’ Mets.

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Share Your Summer Reading List!

Thursday, July 03, 2014

What books are you bringing with you when you go on vacation this summer? Have there been books on your nightstand that you've been waiting to read? Let us know what you're reading—at the beach, by the lake, or on the subway. Leave a comment below!

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Matt Taibbi on the Rise of Injustice and Inequality in America

Thursday, July 03, 2014

Matt Taibbi discusses the intersection of two of the most troubling trends in American society—growing wealth inequality and mass incarceration. He argues that our current system of justice allows massively destructive fraud by the hyper-wealthy to go unpunished, while it turns poverty itself into a crime. His new book on the topic is The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap.

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Bob Saget, a Family Man Turned Filthy Comedian

Thursday, July 03, 2014

Bob Saget played the sweet, neurotic father on “Full House,” and the wisecracking host of “America's Funniest Home Videos,” but he also has a darker, dirtier side, as fans of the film The Aristocrats know. 

On how he ended up in the film, The Aristocrats: "And that was an accident just happening anyway. It was completely a stream of consciousness idea and I’d only heard the joke twice in my life. And I was doing it ‘cause Penn Gillette and Paul Provenza, who I knew since I was in college, wanted me to do it ‘cause they knew I had an irreverent style. They knew that I like to say wrong things because, basically, I was told not to my whole life."

What did he think when he saw the film for the first time? "This is either going to destroy me or it’s going to find a whole new audience."

Saget told us about his earliest acts when he got the comedy bug at the age of 17. "I would say weird things like: “My mother’s Gumby. My father’s Pokey. And I’m Mr. Potato Head.” It was just odd, esoteric stuff."

Saget's book is Dirty Daddy: The Chronicles of a Family Man Turned Filthy Comedian.

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Inside the Weird, Woolly World of Sports Mascots

Thursday, July 03, 2014

In 1994 AJ Mass became the first person to put on the Mr. Met suit since the mascot was retired in the 1960s, and he played Mr. Met through the 1997 season. His book Yes, It’s Hot in Here: Adventures in the Weird, Woolly World of Sports Mascots he describes life inside the suit and explores the entertaining history of the sports mascot from its roots in Renaissance society.

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Mookie Wilson on Life, Baseball, and the 1986 Mets

Thursday, July 03, 2014

New York Mets legend Mookie Wilson talks about being part of the Mets 1986 World Series Victory. When Mookie landed in Shea Stadium in 1980, the Mets were perennial in the shadow of the Yankees. But inspired by Mookie’s legendary hustle, they would soon become the toast of New York. Even when their off-field antics eclipsed their on-field successes, Mookie stayed above the fray. He writes about his adventures and victories in Mookie: Life, Baseball, and the ’86 Mets.

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The Reality of Reality Television

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

The reality TV production workforce is booming in New York City (one estimate has it at more than 12,000 jobs), but the conditions pale in comparison to the more established fiction TV industry. The industry is almost entirely freelance, and workers on reality shows routinely work 12 or 14 hour days, 7 days a week, with no overtime or benefits. Lowell Peterson, executive director of the Writers Guild East, and David Van Taylor, who has worked as a creator, show-runner, producer, director, and writer, discuss the reality television industry’s conditions and why they think they should change. The New York City Council is considering promoting a Code of Conduct for the industry to try to establish some basic minimum standards of work hours, overtime, and benefits.

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We're Up To Our Gills In Imported Seafood - And That's Not Good

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

In 2005, the United States imported five billion pounds of seafood, nearly double what we imported 20 years earlier. But during that same period, our seafood exports also went up dramatically. Paul Greenberg investigates the unraveling of the nation’s seafood supply and tells the surprising story of why Americans stopped eating seafood caught in our own waters. American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood examines New York oysters, Gulf shrimp, and Alaskan salmon to reveal how it came to be that 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat is foreign.

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The Fight for Local Seafood and the Fight for Improving the Reality Television Industry

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Paul Greenberg investigates the unraveling of the nation’s seafood supply...and looks at why we don’t eat fish caught in our own waters.  Director Steve James and Chaz Ebert, Roger Ebert’s widow, talk about the influential film critic’s life and work. Jeffery Renard Allen talks about his new novel, Song of the Shank, about an autistic 19th century slave who was a musical genius. And we’ll discuss the working conditions of producers working in reality television—who routinely work 12 or 14 hour days, 7 days a week with no overtime or benefits.

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Roger Ebert's Life at the Movies

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Roger Ebert, who died in 2013, was a beloved national figure and one of the best-known and most influential movie critics. Academy Award-winning director Steve James talks about his documentary “Life Itself,” about Roger Ebert’s life and career. He’s joined by Ebert’s widow, Chaz Ebert. The film recounts his journey—from politicized school newspaperman to Chicago Sun-Times movie critic to Pulitzer Prize winner to household name to his “third act” as a major voice on the Internet when he could no longer physically speak. It opens July 4 at the Landmark Sunshine Cinema and the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

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Song of the Shank, a Novel by Jeffery Renard Allen

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Jeffery Renard Allen talks about his new novel, Song of the Shank, a contemporary American story about music, race, an unforgettable man, and an unreal America during the Civil War era. At the heart of this novel is Thomas Greene Wiggins, a 19th-century slave and improbable musical genius who performed under the name Blind Tom.

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