Streams

Everyday Interactions Foster Debate, Compromise and Healthier Communities

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Routines that once put doctors and lawyers in touch with grocers and plumbers—casual, everyday interactions that encouraged debate and compromise—have changed dramatically over the last 50 years. Marc J. Dunkelman argues that the disappearance of these community interactions are to blame America's economic troubles and political gridlock. Social media and technology make it seem like we’re more connected than ever, but they’re no substitute for human connections within our neighborhoods and communities. In his book The Vanishing Neighbor: The Transformation of American Community Dunkelman looks at this shift in American life, and shows how incidental interactions have built local communities and fostered healthy debate for centuries.

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Vanishing Neighbors, Diagnosing Pets, and a Reemerging Disease

Thursday, August 07, 2014

On today’s show, Marc Dunkelman argues that we've become less aware of what's happening in the lives of people from different economic backgrounds, education levels, or age groups, and this disconnect lies at the heart of America's economic troubles and political gridlock. Laurel Braitman explores mental health issues, therapy, and recovery in the animal kingdom. Julia Stiles and  James Wirt discuss their roles in the play “Phoenix.” And we’ll find out about an outbreak of bubonic plague in Madagascar.

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The Black Plague Returns

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Madagascar reports the more instances of the black plague—yes that black plague—than any other place on the planet. And although the disease is easily treatable with antibiotics, plague still kills people in Madagascar. A 2013 outbreak sickened 600 people and caused more than 90 deaths. Vice senior editor Benjamin Shapiro traveled to the country to investigate the shocking persistence of this disease and why little is being done about it. His article is  "The Hot Zone."

 

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Michael Johnson was Sexually Reckless, But Is He a Criminal?

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Buzzfeed contributor Steven Thrasher tells the story of how a college wrestler in Missouri named Michael Johnson—whose online name was Tiger Mandingo—was charged for “recklessly infect[ing] another with HIV,” a felony. Thrasher’s article “How College Wrestling Star "Tiger Mandingo" Became An HIV Scapegoat” appeared on Buzzfeed in July 7. 

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Just The Two Of Us: The Creative Power of Pairing Up

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Famous creative duos—like John Lennon and Paul McCartney, Marie and Pierre Curie, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak—usually have a special chemistry. Joshua Wolf Shenk looks at how creative intimacy unfolds, and examines new scientific research into the foundations of creativity. In his book Powers of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs, he reveals how pairs begin to talk, think, and even look like each other; how the most successful creative partners thrive on conflict; and why some duos flame out while others endure.

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Your Cultural Biases May Be Affecting Your Bottom Line

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Different cultures have different social graces and different approaches to business. It can be a challenge for a global businesses to navigate cultural traps that could endanger careers and sink deals. Erin Meyer provides a field-tested model for decoding how cultural differences impact international business. Her book The Culture Map: Breaking Through the Invisible Boundaries of Global Business  offers practical advice for succeeding in a global world.

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The Hollywood Smile That Lifted the Conservative Brand

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Rick Perlstein looks at the tumultuous political and economic situations of the 1970s. In January 1973 Richard Nixon announced the end of the Vietnam War and prepared for a triumphant second term—until televised Watergate hearings brought him down in 1974. Congressional investigators exposed the CIA for assassinating foreign leaders. While the national mood and economy soured, Ronald Reagan was inventing his conservative political brand—strong, optimistic, and patriotic. Perlstein’s book The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan examines this transformation in the Republican Party.

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How the Rocky 1970s Gave Rise to Ronald Reagan

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

On today’s show, Rick Perlstein discusses the political and economic turmoil of the 1970s, and the transition between Richard Nixon’s downfall and the rise of Ronald Reagan. We’ll get some practical advice for understanding cultural divides in a global world. Buzzfeed contributor Steven Thrasher tells the story of how Michael Johnson, a Missouri college wrestler, was tried and found guilty of infecting people with HIV. Joshua Wolf Shenk looks at the chemistry that makes creative partnerships, like Lennon and McCartney’s, work.

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Love, Hate and Roommates

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Sharing a home can be a dream or a nightmare, depending on the space, personalities and the situation. We talk to the women who wrote the playbook on how to be a good roommate and how to cope with bad ones.

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'Gangnam Style' and the Global Influence of South Korea

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

The song “Gangnam Style,” is more than a catchy tune, it’s part of South Korea’s elaborate and effective strategy to become the world’s number one pop culture exporter. Euny Hong gives an account of how South Korea has become a global leader in business, technology, education, and pop culture. Her book The Birth of Korean Cool: How One Nation Is Conquering the World Through Pop Culture reveals how a nation that once banned miniskirts, long hair on men, and rock music has begun to mass produce boy bands, soap operas, and smart phones.

 

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Roommate Survival Stories and Advice

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Peter Elkind, editor-at-large at Fortune, describes the little-known visa-for-sale program that allows wealthy foreigners to obtain U.S. citizenship. We’ll find out how South Korea is becoming a global leader in business, technology, education, and pop culture. Richard House talks about his new crime conspiracy novel The Kills. We’ll discuss the rewarding, challenging and frustrating experiences of living with roommates.

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The Kills, a Crime and Conspiracy Novel

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Richard House discusses The Kills, a crime and conspiracy novel told in four books set across the globe, from Iraq to Naples to Reims to New York. At the heart of the book is a missing $53 million, the fruits of a shady contractor’s cunning scheme to embezzle funds from an American building venture in the Iraqi desert. 

 

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How to Buy a U.S. Visa

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Fortune editor-at-large Peter Elkind investigates the visa-for-sale program that allows wealthy foreigners to obtain U.S. citizenship.

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Getting a PhD in the Humanities Could Wreck Your Life

Monday, August 04, 2014

Rebecca Schuman, education columnist for Slate and Market Crash Course columnist at The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Vitae hub, discusses grade inflation, issues between professors and students, tenure, the rise in adjunct professors, the perils of getting a PhD in the humanities, and other issues in higher education. After spending four years looking for a tenure track position after finishing her PhD in German, she wrote a guest column for Slate—“Thesis Hatement: Getting a literature PhD will turn you into an emotional trainwreck, not a professor”—and began her career as a higher-education columnist.

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How Robert Altman Changed the Movies

Monday, August 04, 2014

The director of "M*A*S*H," "Nashville," "Gosford Park," and other great films defied Hollywood conventions.

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Tribute: Steve Post

Monday, August 04, 2014

Former WNYC host and world-class curmudgeon Steve Post died Sunday, August 3, at age 70. His program "Morning Music” ran for two decades. He left the station in 2001, but returned to host a weekly program called “The No Show.” Post was known for his pointed asides on everything from politics to station management. Leonard spoke with Steve Post on the Leonard Lopate Show in 2008 and in 1995.

Steve Post and John Schaefer talk with Leonard Lopate about their time at WNYC in March 2008    Steve Post and Leonard Lopate Talk about a New York Times article about Post in August 1995

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Revisiting the Cuban Missile Crisis

Monday, August 04, 2014

Stephen L. Carter's historical thriller imagines the secret communications between Kennedy and Khrushchev.

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Shaking Up the World: From Global Conflict to the Classroom

Monday, August 04, 2014

On today’s show: Rebecca Schuman, education columnist for Slate, discusses grade inflation, adjunct professors, tenure, relationships between professors and students, and other issues in higher education. Robert Altman’s widow, Kathryn Reed Altman, and actor Bob Balaban talk about the unorthodox director of M*A*S*H, Nashville, Short Cuts, Gosford Park, and other memorable movies. Stephen Carter talks about his new novel, called Back Channel, a retelling of the Cuban Missile Crisis. And New York Times columnist Roger Cohen looks at the ways WWI shaped the world—and whether a conflict on that scale could happen again.

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Could Another World War Happen?

Monday, August 04, 2014

One hundred years after the start of World War I, New York Times columnist Roger Cohen examines how that conflict shaped the world today and argues that a war on that scale could happen again.

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Guest Picks: Stephen Adly Guirgis

Friday, August 01, 2014

Stephen Adly Guirgis was on the show August 1, 2014 to talk about his new play, Between Riverside and Crazy. He's a fan of hip-hop and the Mets. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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