Streams

David Boies and Ted Olson Make the Case for Marriage Equality

Friday, August 29, 2014

We are re-airing this interview which originally aired on June 25, 2014. 

Attorneys David Boies and Ted Olson tell the inside story of the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling on California’s Proposition 8. Boies and Olson argued against each other in the Supreme Court in Bush v. Gore in 2000, but they joined forces after that battle to forge the unique legal argument that would pave the way for marriage equality. Their book Redeeming the Dream: The Case for Marriage Equality tells the story of the five-year struggle to win the right for gays to marry, from Proposition 8’s adoption by California voters in 2008 to its defeat before the highest court in the land in Hollingsworth v. Perry in 2013.

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The Delicious Knish

Friday, August 29, 2014

We are re-airing this interview which originally aired on June 25, 2014. 

Laura Silver describes her round-the-world quest for the origins and modern-day manifestations of the knish. Starting in New York, she tracks down heirs to several knish dynasties and discovers that her own family has roots in a Polish town named Knyszyn. In Knish: In Search of the Jewish Soul Food Silver tells stories of entrepreneurship, survival, and delicious knishes. She even meets a legendary knish maker, who share their family recipe.

The first written record of a knish dates back to 1614 and Polish town of Krakowiec (now in Ukraine). No filling was mentioned, but it may have contained grains.

The word “knish” has links to Ukrainian, Russian, Yiddish, Polish, and old German. You pronounce the “k” (kah-NISH), though Silver met some people in the Midwest who make the “k” silent (nish).

 Silver says that the knish could make a comeback in the coming years. “I think the knish is poised for a renaissance in the US, in Poland and beyond because it’s still a wholesome food. One that has this mark of history and something homemade. And it’s a great way to break bread – or break knish – together.”

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Swoosie Kurtz: Part Swan, Part Goose

Friday, August 29, 2014

We are re-airing this interview which originally aired on April 29, 2014. 

Actress Swoosie Kurtz looks back on her life and career. Her new memoir, Part Swan, Part Goose is a combination of personal misadventure and showbiz lore. She candidly reflects on the right choices that empowered her, the wrong choices that enlightened her, and her experience caring for an aging parent.

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Inspired Architect James Stewart Polshek

Friday, August 29, 2014

We are re-airing this interview which originally aired on April 29, 2014. 

Architect James Stewart Polshek, whose works include the Rose Center at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and the Newseum in Washington, D.C.,  discusses his life’s work and the process of designing buildings. He also served as the dean of Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation from 1972 to 1987. His book Build, Memory is about witnessing changing architectural tastes, working with numerous high-profile personalities, and designing some of America’s most prominent buildings, including the William J. Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock, Arkansas, and the renovation and expansion of Carnegie Hall in New York City.

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Joan Rivers, Mad Diva

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Note: Today's Leonard Lopate Show in on tape. This is a rebroadcast of an interview that took place on June 30th, 2014. 

Joan was given a diary by her daughter for Christmas, and after complaining that she wasn't gifted a "certificate for Botox," she began writing in it and ultimately created her new book, Diary of a Mad Diva. The preface warns that anyone who takes its contents seriously is an "idiot."

In this exclusive interview, the 81 year old comedienne tackles topics for all the non-idiots: ranging from the "brilliant" Kardashian sisters, to why she doesn't wear the color yellow, to why she'll never apologize for her jokes. 

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You Can't Believe Everything You Read, on the Internet or by Joan Rivers

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Charles Seife explains why, when it comes to the Internet, you shouldn’t believe everything you read—and how to tell the difference between truth and fiction. Francisco Goldman talks about trying to make sense of Mexico City, one of the world’s largest metropolises. We’ll find out how many words in the English language were once considered linguistic mistakes, slang, or just plain wrong. And the one and only Joan Rivers takes us inside her everyday world and shares her thoughts on life, celebrities and pop culture.

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The Scandalous History of Proper English

Thursday, August 28, 2014

We are re-airing this interview which originally aired on June 30, 2014. 

English is a glorious mess of a language, cobbled together from a wide variety of sources and syntaxes, and changing over time with popular usage. Many of the words and usages we embrace as standard and correct today were at first considered slang, impolite, or just plain wrong. Ammon Shea looks at language “mistakes” and how they came to be accepted as correct—or not. His book Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation chronicles the long history of language mistakes.

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Just Because It's on the Internet Doesn't Make It True

Thursday, August 28, 2014

We are re-airing this interview which originally aired on June 30, 2014. 

Digital information spreads rapidly, reaches all corners of society, and is basically impossible to control—even when that information is false. Charles Seife look into the Internet information jungle and explains how to identify and avoid the trickery and fakery that’s so prevalent online. His book Virtual Unreality: Just Because the Internet Told You, How Do You Know It’s True? takes on breaking news coverage, online dating, Wikipedia, and more.

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An Inside Look at the Hidden Stories of Mexico City

Thursday, August 28, 2014

We are re-airing this interview which originally aired on June 30, 2014. 

Francisco Goldman discusses the life and culture of one of the world’s most remarkable and often misunderstood cities—Mexico City. Mexico’s narco war continues to rage on, and in the summer of 2013, Mexican organized crime violence erupted in the city. His book The Interior Circuit: A Mexico City Chronicle is an account of his personal and political awakening in Mexico City and a look at the challenges the city faces.

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Sticking Up For Teachers

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

A former teacher returns to the classroom and offers a rousing defense of his beleaguered vocation.
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The New Museum Showcases Art from the Arab World

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

The first museum-wide exhibition in New York City to feature contemporary art from and about the Arab world.
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When Leaning In Means Falling Short

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Three women argue that the contemporary “lean-in,” trickle-down feminist philosophy is depoliticizing politics, labor issues, and economics.
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Why a Potential New Cancer Treatment Was Covered Up

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

What led a science writer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center to expose a cover-up involving a potentially promising experimental cancer therapy.  
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Bringing to Light: A Cancer Treatment Cover Up, Arab Art, Modern Feminism

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

A whistle-blower at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. A look at the obstacles and challenges teachers face every day. “Here and Elsewhere” at the New Museum. The feminist movement.
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Pies, Crisps, and Cobblers: Making the Most of Your Summer Fruit

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Melissa Clark offers tips on what to do with all the fruit that’s in season right now—peaches, plums, apricots, melons, berries and more! 
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Recipe: Melissa Clark's Upside Down Polenta Plum Cake

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

A moist cake to make with the plums that are in season this summer.
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Making the Most of Summer Fruit, Making a Documentary about Photographer Dorothea Lange

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Melissa Clark talks summer fruit. What makes Honda tick. A documentary about photographer Dorothea Lange. A lawsuit over the Fukushima disaster.
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The Invisible Photographer Who Captured The Great Depression

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Photographer Dorothea Lange took some of the most powerful and iconic images of America during the Great Depression, and her photograph "Migrant Mother" is one of the most recognized and arresting images in the world. Yet few know the story, struggles, and profound body of work of the woman behind the camera. Dyanna Taylor, Dorothea’s granddaughter, talks about directing, writing, producing, and narrating the documentary “Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning.” She’s joined by Elizabeth Partridge, Lange’s goddaughter, who is featured in it. “Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning” is part of PBS’s American Masters series, and it premieres August 29, at 9 pm.

 

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Did a Japanese Energy Company Lie About Radiation Levels in Fukushima to the U.S. Navy?

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Guardian environmental reporter Suzanne Goldenberg discusses a $1 billion lawsuit filed by sailors in the U.S. Navy that accuses the Japanese electric company Tepco of failing to avoid the Fukushima nuclear accident and of lying about radiation levels that have caused health problems for them and their families stationed in Japan. She’s written about the lawsuit in The Guardian, and the story later appeared in Mother Jones as part of their partnership with Climate Desk. 

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What Makes Honda's Engine Roar

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Honda prefers decentralization over corporate control, simplicity over complexity, and experimentation over efficiency, which sets it apart from Toyota and other competitors.
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