Streams

The Second Amendment: Controversial, Volatile, and Misunderstood

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Michael Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice, on the rough and tumble debate over what the Second Amendment actually means.
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The Smear Campaign that Kept Us Off the Metric System

Monday, August 18, 2014

For a time in the 1970s, America seemed ready to make the switch. Then certain powers that be scared us into sticking with our own confusing system.
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Travel the World in Your Kitchen

Monday, August 18, 2014

Mark Kurlansky and his daughter Talia share their tradition of cooking international recipes from around the world.

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Recipe: Mark and Talia Kurlansky's Haitian Blanc Manger Mamiche

Monday, August 18, 2014

The most common dessert for poor Haitians, which really is most Haitians, is pan patat, a sweet-potato pudding similar to the dessert for Mexico Night. But for more affluent Haitians, a lighter, more delicate dessert is blanc manger. This dessert, a tropical version of an old French recipe, turns up in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century writing and is found most anywhere in Latin America where the French ever ruled, including Mexico and the Dominican Republic. But nowhere has it remained as popular as in Haiti.

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Recipe: Mark and Talia Kurlansky Haitian Griyo de Porc

Monday, August 18, 2014

Until the 1980s, pork was the common meat of Haiti. The so called “Creole pig” was small and black and lived off the land, foraging for food. Haitian peasants could let them grow and only slaughter them when they needed the money, so they were a kind of living savings account that required little investment. Then it was discovered in 1978 that some of these Creole pigs carried Asian Swine Flu, a highly contagious disease dangerous to livestock. There have been similar outbreaks in other Caribbean countries. When Cuba experienced such an outbreak, the infected pigs were quarantined and the pig population was saved. But in Haiti, the US Agency for International Development, USAID, decided that the Haitian outbreak was a threat to livestock in the Caribbean and the US—and undertook a program to kill 380,000 Creole pigs and replace them with big fat American pigs. The problem was that these larger pigs truly earned the name pig: they ate an enormous amount of food. To Americans, they were a superior animal because they converted food into meat at a far better rate than the meager Creole pig. But that assumes you can afford to keep a piggier pig. In the Haitian rumor mill, the incident is often cited as a plot by the Americans to destroy the Haitian peasant, but in international-development circles it is often cited as an example of why aid to poor countries often fails: a lack of knowledge about local conditions.

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Recipe: Mark and Talia Kurlansky's Haitian Grilled Octopus

Monday, August 18, 2014

Grilled Octopus

This dish actually should be made with conch, which the Haitians call lambi. Conch, though, is hard to get, not only where I live but everywhere. In Haiti, fishermen have become so accustomed to taking young, undersize conch that they no longer even remember what a full-size adult looks like. The mature conch has a broad lip that extends far beyond the coiled body. Look at the piles of shells bleached white and pink in the Haitian sun that accumulate where fishermen work, and you will not find one fully mature shell.

Octopus is arguably better food than conch. Stories of how it is tough and must be beaten to break down the fiber and make it edible are not true. However, this is true of conch. So why isn’t more octopus eaten? Simply because fishermen hate them. Octopus are hard to kill and they do not lie peacefully on the deck of a fishing boat or even in a tank. They wander. They like to get into things. They crawl into bags and gear. They hang from the ceiling of the pilothouse. They crawl into the engine hatch. They are a nuisance, but a tasty nuisance.

If you follow this simple recipe, the octopus will not be tough. Have the fish store remove the organ sack and the ink sack, cut off the beak in the center, and cut out the eyes.

 

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How Theodore Roosevelt Helped Create Progressive Politics

Monday, August 18, 2014

A look at the power struggle that created the progressive movement and defined modern American politics at the turn of the 20th century.

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How to Multi-Task and Better Manage Your Time at Home and at Work

Monday, August 18, 2014

A psychologist and neuroscientist explains how new research into attention and memory can help us navigate information overload.

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Multi-tasking, Measuring, Progressive Politics

Monday, August 18, 2014

On today’s show: We’ll find out how new research into attention and memory can help us multi-task and to better manage our time at home and at work! Mark Kurlansky and his daughter Talia Kurlansky talk about their weekly ritual of cooking recipes from around the world. Most of the rest of the world uses the metric system, and in the 1970s, the US seemed ready to make the switch and give up our odd system of measurement. We’ll find out why we never did. And how Teddy Roosevelt helped create the progressive movement and redefined modern American politics.

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Amy Bloom's Lucky Us: A Small Town Girl Living in a Lonely World

Friday, August 15, 2014

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Italian Futurism at the Guggenheim Museum

Friday, August 15, 2014

Curator Vivien Green talks about the first comprehensive overview in the United States of one of Europe’s most important 20th-century avant-garde movements.

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How Highways Changed America

Friday, August 15, 2014

Many families who travel for the summer will pack up the car and jump on the highway to their destination. On this week's Please Explain, Dan McNichol, author of The Roads that Built America: The Incredible Story of the U.S. Interstate System, explains how the country's highways were planned and created, more than 50 years ago, how these roadways changed the country by connecting cities and small towns, creating the suburbs, and improving transportation of people and goods.

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How Fracking Affects People, Pets, and Our Food

Friday, August 15, 2014

A veterinarian and a pharmacologist investigate heath problems in people, pets, and livestock living near fracking sites.

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Fracking, Futurism, and Funding our National Highway System

Friday, August 15, 2014

On today’s show: A veterinarian and a pharmacologist look at fracking’s impact on the health of people, pets, and livestock. Curator Vivien Greene talks about the Guggenheim Museum exhibition “Italian Futurism, 1909-1944." Amy Bloom discusses her acclaimed new novel, Lucky Us. This week’s Please Explain is all about the interstate highway system that criss-crosses the country!

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When did the Police Turn into the Military?

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Over the last decade many state and local law enforcement agencies have become increasingly militarized. Kara Dansky, a senior counsel at the ACLU and one of the authors of the report War Comes Home, explains how and why federal programs have created incentives for law enforcement to use paramilitary tactics and military grade weapons, including mine-resistant armored vehicles.

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Guest Picks: Marty Stuart

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Marty Stuart was on the Lopate show August 14, 2014 to talk about his new book of photography, American Ballads. He's a fan of Tony Bennett. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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How George Takei Conquered Facebook

Thursday, August 14, 2014

The actor talks about his breakout role as Mr. Sulu on "Star Trek," his activism, becoming a social media phenomenon, the new documentary about his life - "To Be Takei," directed by Jennifer Kroot.

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Marty Stuart on Photographing Music Legends and Eccentric Americans

Thursday, August 14, 2014

He began photographing what he called "the history in the making" going on around him when he was a teenager, on tour with Lester Flatt.

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What We Can Learn from the Rats of Manhattan

Thursday, August 14, 2014

This summer Dr. Jason Munshi-South, associate professor of biology at Fordham University, is trapping rats all across Manhattan to analyze their DNA. By identifying related populations of rats, Dr. Munshi-South and his team hope to better understand how the rodents move around the city. The project, which is collecting rats in all of Manhattan’s 41 zip codes, is called Cityscape Genomics of Rats in New York City.

Read more about some of Dr. Munshi-South’s work here.

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Human Rights, Activism and George Takei

Thursday, August 14, 2014

On today’s show: Legal professor Samuel Moyn looks at the history and politics of human rights and talks about what justifies humanitarian intervention. Actor, activist and social media superstar George Takei discusses his life and career—along with Jennifer Kroot, who’s made a documentary called “To Be Takei.” Five-time Grammy winner Marty Stuart talks about his photographs of legendary musicians, eccentric characters and portraits of members of the Lakota tribe. And we’ll look at the growing militarization of American policing and why some small town sheriffs’ departments have been given heavily armored tanks.

 

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