Streams

Digging Into Education, Film, and a Tyrannosaurus Rex

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Joel Klein on fixing our school system. Chuck Workman on Orson Welles. A film about the most complete Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton ever found. Edward Albee’s play, A Delicate Balance.
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Winterize Your Castle, or Your Walkup, With the Gurus of How-To

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Keep the water running and the roof not-caved-in this winter, with tips from Al Ubell and Larry Ubell.
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Torture, Drones, Surveillance... And Civil Liberties

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

The Director of the ACLU's National Security Project looks at the new Senate Report on torture in interrogation, as well as President Obama’s war legacy.
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Organic Trees, Offensive Scents, and the "George Burns Theory of Toxicology."

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Many listeners had questions for industrial hygienist Monona Rossol yesterday. We didn't have time for all of them, but Monona was kind enough to answer listener questions here. 
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Teaching English Under Kim Jong-Il

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Teaching English to the sons of North Korea's ruling class during the last six months of Kim Jong-il's reign.
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Homeland Security, Teaching English in N. Korea, and Home Repair

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Hina Shamsi, director of the ACLU, on Obama's war legacy. Suki Kim on teaching English in North Korea. Laura Kipnis on Men Behaving Badly. Al Ubell and Larry Ubell on winter home repair.
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Laura Kipnis Looks at Her Personal Life, and the Public Eye, When It Comes to Men Behaving Badly

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Laura Kipnis talks about her collection of essays exploring why badly behaved men have been her lifelong fascination, on and off the page.
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Conjoined Twins, Vaudeville Stars: Rejected and Celebrated, Together

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Academy Award-winning director Bill Condon and actors Erin Davie and Emily Padgett discuss the new Broadway musical Side Show. The show tells the true story of Daisy and Violet Hilton, conjoined twins, who were legends in their time and the highest paid performers on the vaudeville circuit, and their search for first love and acceptance amidst the spectacle of fame and scrutiny under the spotlight. The musical is playing at Broadway’s St. James Theatre

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A Tech Mogul Dives Into Investigative Journalism: The Chaos Behind Pierre Omidyar First Look Media

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Vanity Fair contributing editor Sarah Ellison discusses her in-depth portrait of eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, his rapid rise to wealth, and the chaos of his investigative journalism start-up, First Look Media. Ellison's article “The Unmanageables” appears in the January 2015 issue of Vanity Fair.

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Celebrating Christmas Safely, and Conjoined Vaudeville Stars

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Industrial hygienist Monona Rossol discusses the potential hazards of Christmas decorations. Robbie Rogers, soccer player for the L.A. Galaxy, the first openly gay player in Major League Soccer. Academy Award-winning director Bill Condon and actors Erin Davie and Emily Padgett discuss the new Broadway musical Side Show, about conjoined twins, who were legends in their time and the highest paid performers on the vaudeville circuit. Vanity Fair contributing editor Sarah Ellison discusses her in-depth portrait of eBay founder Pierre Omidyar.

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The Hazards of Christmas Decorations

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Industrial hygienist Monona Rossol discusses the potential hazards of Christmas decorations, and the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission’s proposed rules about them. A chemist and an artist, Rossol is the president and founder of Arts, Crafts and Theater Safety, Inc., a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to providing health and safety services to the arts. She is the author of Pick Your Poison: How Our Mad Dash to Chemical Utopia is Making Lab Rats of Us All.

Many listeners had questions for industrial hygienist Monona Rossol. We didn't have time to address all of them on-air, but Monona was kind enough to answer listener questions here

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Robbie Rogers, The First Openly Gay Player in a Major North American Professional Sports League

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Robbie Rogers, soccer player for the L.A. Galaxy, has a career that includes an NCAA Championship, winning the MLS Cup, and competing in the Olympics, yet he feared that coming out as a gay man would derail his rising career. He discusses this struggle in Coming Out to Play. Rogers remembers his paralyzing fear that sharing his big secret would cost him the love of his family and his career. While the world around him was changing with breathtaking speed, he knew that prejudices still ran deep for many in the world of professional sports.

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As New York City Neighborhoods Change, How Are Landmarks Protected?

Monday, December 08, 2014

Margaret Newman, Executive Director of The Municipal Art Society, and Meenakshi Srinivasan, Chair of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, discuss the process, and politics, of designating buildings as New York City Landmarks. Last week, the Landmark Preservation Commission decided not to "de-calendar" close to 100 New York City historic sites. Calendaring is the first step in designating a protected landmark.

Which buildings do you think deserve to be landmarked? Tell us in the comments below. 

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What is the Future of Christianity in the Modern Century?

Monday, December 08, 2014

How has the role of religious faith changed in the twenty-first century? New York Times bestselling Catholic writer James Carroll discusses the revival of transcendent faith in the modern world. His new book, Christ Actually: The Son of God for the Secular Age, takes a fresh look at the Twelve Apostles, and Jesus, in light of modern atrocities and genocides. 

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An American Stockbroker Confronts Horrors in Pakistan in Ayad Akhtar’s New Play

Monday, December 08, 2014

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Ayad Akhtar discusses his new play The Invisible Hand. He will be joined by two of the show's leading actors, Justin Kirk and Usman Ally. The play follows Nick Bright, an American stock broker, into a terrifying world of kidnapping and torture in a remote region of Pakistan. As Nick negotiates to save his own life he begins to see his captors in a new light. The Invisible Hand runs through January 4 at the New York Theater Workshop

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Tribute: Kent Haruf

Monday, December 08, 2014

After Kent Haruf’s 1999 novel Plainsong was a finalist for the National Book Award, he became an overnight sensation at the age of 56 (after having written for decades). With spare, understated writing, he brought to life a fictitious small town in eastern Colorado in the subsequent novels Eventide and Benediction. He had just finished Our Souls at Night this summer, which his wife is copy editing now (she is said to have told him “Don’t you die before you finish it.”). Tragically, he died of complications from a lung disease just last week at the age of 71. You can hear his 2004 interview with Leonard after publishing Eventide

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International Upheaval, Local Preservation

Monday, December 08, 2014

George Packer discusses his new profile of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. James Carroll's new book examines how religious faith has changed in the modern world. Ayad Akhtar's new play "The Invisible Hand" is about an American stock broker who falls into a terrifying world of kidnapping and torture in Pakistan. Meenakshi Srinivasan, Chair of the Landmarks Preservation Commission, and Margaret Newman, Executive Director of The Municipal Art Society, discusses the process, and politics, of designating buildings as New York City Landmarks.

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From Ossi Scientist to Chancellor of Germany, Angela Merkel: The Most Powerful Woman In the World

Monday, December 08, 2014

Angela Merkel is one of the most powerful women in the world, and her rise to Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany is extraordinary, given her biography. She has been divorced and remarried, received a doctorate in chemistry, and was raised in East Germany. She is a deft politician, and has a complicated relationship with both President Obama and Vladimir Putin. George Packer discusses his profile of the life and politics of Merkel, The Quiet German, in the Dec. 1 issue of The New Yorker. 

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Leonard Lopate Weekend: Overdevelopment of Historic Neighborhoods, Grilled Beaver Tail & Appreciating Art

Friday, December 05, 2014

This week: we look at how New York City's historic neighborhoods are still at risk for overdevelopment with Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and Michael Kimmelman, architecture critic of The New York Times (First). Then, Dr. Libby H. O'Connell discusses how economics, technology, and social movements have changed American palates dramatically (34:30). And Philippe de Montebello, the longest-serving director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in its history, discusses how and why we look at art (53:50).

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Guest Picks: Tracie Thoms

Friday, December 05, 2014

Tracie Thoms and John Hawkes joined us on December 5, 2014 to talk about their new play, "Lost Lake." Tracie is a fan of Alice Smith and The Walking Dead. Find out what else she's a fan of!

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