Streams

Behind the Scenes

Thursday, May 31, 2012

On today’s show: we’ll take a look at some of the questionable corporate practices in fundraising for breast cancer awareness and research. Jonathan Pryce, Alex Hassle, and Alan Cox talk about the new production of Harold Pinter’s classic play “The Caretaker,” now at BAM. We’ll find out how Argentine wines and the humble Malbec grape have become a global brand. Plus, on Backstory: the verdict in the case against former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak is expected on Saturday, so we’ll take the temperature of the Egyptian electorate. Then we’ll hear the story of how a Guatemalan man found out that he had had been kidnapped during the civil war there.

Connected

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

On today’s show: We’ll try to find the center of the Internet... and take a look at the infrastructure that enables much of the World Wide Web. We’ll find out about the role cheese has played in human culture. Joe Blair discusses his memoir By The Iowa Sea. Plus, attorney Michael Armstrong describes the tense two years he spent on the Knapp Commission's investigation into NYPD corruption.

Drilling Down

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

On today’s show: Ellis Cose looks at how our ideas about race have shifted and that means for the country’s future. James Corden and Jemima Rooper talk about starring in the acclaimed British comedy now on Broadway, “One Man, Two Guvnors.” Then Topher Grace and Olivia Thirlby talk about their roles in the off-Broadway play, “Lonely, I’m Not,” about a man who hasn’t a date—or a job—in four years. Bob Reiss talks about why oil companies are moving up to the Arctic, and how the new global battle for oil there will shape America’s future.

A Look Back

Monday, May 28, 2012

For today’s Memorial Day show we’re replaying some favorite past interviews. Arthur Goldwag traces populist fear-mongering—from the 18th Century to today’s Birther movement. And Pico Iyer talks about the great English writer Graham Greene. We have the final installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects. Edward St. Aubyn tells about his latest novel, At Last. Plus, we’ll look at the contributions of American gay writers in the 20th century, including Gore Vidal, Tony Kushner, and others.

Game Changers

Friday, May 25, 2012

For today’s show we're re-airing some of our favorite interviews from recent months. First, two former opposition researchers explain how their field has become an integral part of modern political campaigning. Michael Oher, the football player who inspired the book and film The Blind Side, talks about his life and upbringing. The 99th object in BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is an HSBC credit card. Krys Lee tells us about her collection of short stories, called Drifting House. And we’ll look at how the creditors in today’s global economy—namely China and the Middle East—will help shape much of the coming century.

Sparks

Thursday, May 24, 2012

On today’s show: Tony- and Pulitzer prize-winning playwright David Auburn, Tony- and Emmy Award-winning actor John Lithgow and Grace Gummer discuss the production of “The Columnist.” Director Philip Kaufman talks about his film about the passionate and tumultuous marriage between Ernest Hemmingway and Martha Gellhorn. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a sculpture made from decommissioned weapons from the Mozambique civil war. Plus, Thailand is the second largest supplier of foreign seafood on to the United States, and on Underreported, we’ll take a look at the use of slave labor in southeast Asian fisheries.

News You Can Use

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

David Westin talks about his tenure as president of ABC News, during some of the most tumultuous years in recent history. Today’s installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a 1966 etching by David Hockney, from a series illustrating 14 poems by the Greek poet C. P. Cavafy. And Peter Kaminsky and Marion Nestle explain how to have healthy eating habits without sacrificing the flavor, fun, and pleasure of food.

Cover Story

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

More than two-thirds of the new airports under construction today are being built in China. James Fallows talks about China’s pursuit of aerospace supremacy. Today’s installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a Russian plate depicting a worker trampling the word “Kapital.” New Yorker art editor Françoise Mouly talks about her book Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See.

Life Lessons

Monday, May 21, 2012

United States Congressman John Lewis discusses his experience as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and explains how the lessons from that movement still apply today. Today’s installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a British penny coin from 1903, which has been defaced by the Suffragettes. Scientist and explorer John Oldale shares strange and fascinating facts from around the world.

Flying High

Friday, May 18, 2012

Samuel Popkin looks at the winners and losers of political campaigns, and examines what it takes to win—and stay in—the White House. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a Sudanese slit drum. This week’s Please Explain is all about drones and aerial surveillance.

Covert Operations

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Henry Crumpton talks about leading the CIA's global covert operations against terrorists. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about the iconic Japanese print “Under the Wave off Kanagawa.” And Matt Taibbi talks about JP Morgan Chase's trading loss for this week’s Backstory segment.

On the Move

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

UC Berkely economist Enrico Moretti looks at how America’s labor market is being transformed. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a tea set made by the famous Staffordshire pottery firm. David Weber, founder and president of the New York City Food Truck Association, and food truck owners Deborah Smith and Jim Drew talk about the growing industry. 

Keep Growing

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Will Allen, a former professional basketball player and KFC executive, discusses his efforts to promote urban farming. Today’s installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about the chronometer from the HMS Beagle, the ship that took Darwin around the world! Plus, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright tells her very personal story about experiencing the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia.

Moral Molecule and Memoirs

Monday, May 14, 2012

On today’s show: Paul J. Zak describes his research into what has been called “the moral molecule,” Oxytocin. Joe Bastianich talks about his memoir, Restaurant Man. Today’s installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects continues with a mysterious jade disc known as a Bi. Rosecrans Baldwin describes his comic account of living in the French capital, Paris, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down. And The Daily Show co-creator Lizz Winstead talks about her career in comedy.

Diverse Influences

Friday, May 11, 2012

On today’s show: Owen West, a third-generation Marine, discusses The Snake Eaters, his memoir of Iraq. Kiran Ahluwalia performs live and talks about her new album, “Common Ground.” A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a bark shield from Australia. Plus, Please Explain is about the mysterious world of credit ratings. 

Playing the Lead

Thursday, May 10, 2012

On today’s show: Jeff Himmelman discusses his biography of Ben Bradlee, the editor of the Washington Post during Watergate. Two-time Tony Award winner Bebe Neuwirth talks about her role in Classic Stage Company’s production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” A History of the World in 100 Objects continues with a look at a buckskin map from the early American midwest. This week's Underreported segment takes a look at changes to the Martin Act, which now give investors more leeway to sue companies.

Father and Son

Wednesday, May 09, 2012

On today’s show: Martin Sheen and his son Emilio Estevez discuss their new joint memoir. Christopher Buckley talks about his new novel They Eat Puppies, Don’t They? The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at an ornate Hawaiian feather helmet. And our resident word-maven Patricia T. O’Conner takes your calls on the many conundrums of English grammar.

A World Away

Tuesday, May 08, 2012

On today’s show: We’ll get a comprehensive history of the war on cancer and look at how far today’s treatments have come toward cures. Dame Daphne Sheldrick tells about her efforts to conserve wildlife in Africa, which include raising orphaned elephants. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about an Akran drum, one of the oldest surviving African American artifacts. And legal historian and human rights lawyer Sadakat Kadri debunks some of the widespread misconceptions about Sharia law.

A Monumental Undertaking

Monday, May 07, 2012

On today’s show: Former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich discusses what he thinks can be done to redress the current state of wealth inequality in the United States. Teju Cole joins us to talk about Open City, the latest pick of the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club. The latest installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a broadsheet that commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. Plus, Robert Caro talks about the fourth installment of his monumental biography of Lyndon Johnson.

Ins and Outs

Friday, May 04, 2012

Daniel Imhoff explains the inner workings of the massive but little understood Farm Bill. The co-director of the Frieze Art Fair talks about its first year in New York. We’ll take a look at the restoration of Shirley Clarke’s 1962 film “The Connection,” with the restorer, Clarke’s daughter, and one of the stars. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a Spanish missionary map used in Mexico. And our latest Please Explain is about bioluminescence.

Rise and Fall

Thursday, May 03, 2012

On today’s show: Andrew Nagorski discusses how American journalists and writers in Germany viewed the rise of Adolf Hitler. Peter Bergen talks about the 10-year search for Osama bin Laden, and what led to his finally being discovered in Abbottabad last year. A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a shadow puppet. Our latest Backstory segment takes a look at the troubles facing Rupert Murdoch.

Making Memories

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

On today’s show: Eliot Spitzer, the former New York Governor turned broadcaster on his new talk show on Current TV. Then, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Anna Quindlen on her memoir Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake. A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a miniature of a Mughal prince. Also, photographer Mary Ellen Mark and her husband, filmmaker Martin Bell, discuss their unique take on high school Proms around the country. Plus the Gurus of How-To, Alvin and Lawrence Ubell, take your calls on home repair.

Rising Up

Tuesday, May 01, 2012

Auma Obama talks about her life in Africa and Europe, and about connecting with her brother, Barack Obama. Wagner at the Metropolitan Opera. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a Shi'a religious parade standard from Iran. Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman looks at ways to end our economic slump.