Streams

Ladies and Gentlemen

Friday, March 30, 2012

Edward Albee and Jane Alexander join us on today’s show to talk about the revival of “The Lady from Dubuque.” Then, actress Michelle Yeoh and director Luc Besson discuss “The Lady,” their new film about Burma’s Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, Todays’ installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at the stone head of the Buddha. Plus, Please Explain is all about bullying.

Drifting

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Rachel Maddow joins us for today’s show! We’ll discuss everything from the current state of the American media to changes in U.S. military policy, and perhaps even mixology. Robert Kanigel talks about On an Irish Island, his book about the country’s great literary traditions and the vanishing Irish language. Today’s installment of BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at a Japanese bronze mirror. Plus our latest Underreported segment takes a look at a secret NSA data storage facility.

 

Man and Myth

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Paleontologist Ian Tattersall discusses why homo sapiens emerged as the dominant human group. The director of the new documentary “The Island President” and the deposed leader of the Maldives discuss his rise and dramatic fall. Today’s installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at the Hedwig glass beaker. Ellen Ullman talks about her new novel By Blood. And the authors of The Self Made Myth talk about the role government has played in helping individuals and businesses succeed.

Bold-Faced Names

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Hank Haney describes the six tumultuous years he spent coaching Tiger Woods. We’ll look back at the life and work of Edith Wharton, the great American novelist who was born 150 years ago. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects examines a Viking treasure hoard. We’ll find out about a documentary on the New York Photo League, a cooperative of 20th-century activist photographers. And Frank Langella talks about his various encounters with a number of 20th century icons—from Sir Laurence Olivier to Jackie Onassis.

Mavericks

Monday, March 26, 2012

Frontline correspondent Lowell Bergman talks about his new report on Rupert Murdoch’s troubled media dynasty. Michael Tilson Thomas, the director of the San Francisco Symphony, discusses the city-wide celebration “American Mavericks” and his upcoming performances at Carnegie Hall. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at 12 figures buried in the tomb of a Tang era Chinese general. Plus, we’ll look at the controversy surrounding the plans to expand NYU.

Going Deep

Friday, March 23, 2012

Scott Wallace talks about his search through the Amazon to track down one of the jungle’s last indigenous tribes. Terence Davies and Rachel Weisz discuss their new film “The Deep Blue Sea.” A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a statue of the Buddhist goddess Tara. And Please Explain is all about the anxiety and benzodiazepenes, anti-anxiety drugs.

Give and Take

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Elliott Forrest fills in for Leonard Lopate today. The Economist’s Vijay Vaitheeswaran looks at the ways that globalization can be an aid to innovation. Louis Begley discusses Schmidt Steps Back, his new novel about an old character. A History of the World in 100 Objects examines the Lothair crystal. This week’s Backstory segments are about high-frequency trading and about efforts to fight malaria in Cambodia.

 

Resourceful

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Today we’ll take a look at the global race to gobble up the earth’s last natural resources. Novelist Jeanette Winterson talks about her memoir Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects looks fragments from an Iraqi wall painting. Plus, word maven Patricia T. O’Conner takes your calls on the our vexing English language.

 

A Long Road

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Journalist Ahmed Rashid discusses the possibilities and the hazards of American disengagement with Afghanistan and Pakistan. Writer-director Kenneth Lonergan and actress J. Smith-Cameron tell us about their latest film, “Margaret.” Today’s installment of A History of World in 100 Objects takes a look at a lintel from the doorway of a Mayan temple. The young Russian author Alisa Ganieva talks about her award-winning story Salam, Dalgat, which she wrote under a male pseudonym. Plus, we’ll take a look at the Freedom Riders campaign in the south during the 1960s, with activist Dr. Bernard LaFayette Jr. and former civil rights lawyer Gerald Stern.

The Beat Goes On

Monday, March 19, 2012

The New Yorker’s John Seabrook tells us how hit pop songs are made. Abel Ferrara and Willem Dafoe discuss their new film “4:44 Last Day on Earth” and other projects. A History of the World in 100 Objects explores the silk road through a 7th-century Chinese painting. Dr. Ira Byock looks at ways to reform end-of-life care. Plus, James Kunen tells us about going through the process of losing a corporate PR job and, as a result, finding a life.

Accounting for Taste

Friday, March 16, 2012

On today’s show: We’ll find out why nature has seen fit to divide the brain into two hemispheres. We’ll take a look at part three of “The Cruel and Unusual Comedy” film series at MoMA. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects is about an 8th-century Korean roof tile. Plus, our latest Please Explain is all about the sense of taste!

A Whole New World

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Akash Kapur describes moving back to India in 2003 and witnessing the country’s great change. We’ll find out about the small group of men and women who built one of the first computers, completing Alan Turing’s vision of a Universal Machine. Today's installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects continues with a look at a Moche warrior pot, used to guard the grave of a wealthy member of the South American society. Plus our latest Underreported segments.

 

Review and Repair

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Gary Dorrien takes a critical look at the Obama Presidency, from the left. Adrien Brody and director Tony Kaye discuss their new film, “Detachment,” about a substitute teacher. CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks about trying his hand at writing fiction. A History of the World in 100 Objects continues with a look at the Sutton Hoo helmet. Plus, our Gurus of How-to, Al and Larry Ubell, take your calls on home repair!

Fair Game

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Lilly Ledbetter joins us to discuss her legal battles against sex discrimination and about the Fair Pay Act that bears her name. We'll find out why allergy season is off to an early start this year. Today’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a gold coin issued in 696 AD from the Islamic Empire. We’ll look at the ten objects you voted for in our contest to Tell the Story of New York in 10 Objects. Plus, Audrey Tautou talks about her new film “Delicacy.”

Quiet, Please

Monday, March 12, 2012

On today’s show, we’ll find out about the controversy at the New York Public Library. Then, Kristen Johnston talks about being open about her recovery from her addictions to alcohol and drugs. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a bronze hand from pre-Islamic Yemen. Then, a look at the man who’s considered by many to be the world’s top sushi chef. And Susan Cain on what we miss when we overlook the introverts among us.

Internal Issues

Friday, March 09, 2012

Senior editor of The New Republic Noam Scheiber discusses what he calls the "fumbles" of the Obama Administration's economic team. Then, Andy Borowitz joins us to talk about his new satirical memoir about an intestinal ailment called An Unexpected Twist. Also, A History of the World in 100 Objects continues with a look at a Roman mosaic of Christ. Plus, Please Explain is all about the norovirus.

 

Foreign Coverage

Thursday, March 08, 2012

Nada Bakri talks about her late husband, reporter Anthony Shadid, who died last month in Syria. And we’ll be joined by Rajiv Chandrasekaran who worked with Shadid while both of them were covering Iraq. Today’s installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at a silver plate from Iran that was used to promote Zoroastrianism during reign of the Sansanians. Elaine Sciolino joins us for a Backstory Update on the French presidential campaign and the continuing fall-out from the Dominique Strauss-Kahn scandal.

Being Processed

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Ryan Lizza breaks down the results from Super Tuesday and looks at how the race for the Republican nomination is shaping up. Today’s installment of the BBC series A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a gold coin from the Gupta Empire which dominated South Asia in the 4th and 5th centuries. And then, we’ll find out what the working conditions are like inside an online retail shipping warehouse.

Mixed Emotions

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

Ronnie Spector discusses her career and being part of an all-star lineup paying tribute to the Rolling Stones at Carnegie Hall. Daniel Okrent answers your questions about his book, Last Call, for this month's installment of the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club! Nathan Englander talks about his latest collection of short stories. And Mayim Bialik on going from starring in the 90's sitcom, "Blossom" to getting her Ph.D. in neuroscience.

Heaven and Space

Monday, March 05, 2012

Michael Sean Winters examines how Reverend Jerry Falwell has influenced national politics. Today's installment of the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a pepper pot in the shape of a Roman noble woman, found in Britain. Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson discusses NASA and the future of space travel.

Back to Basics

Friday, March 02, 2012

Mark Bittman talks about How to Cook Everything The Basic: All You Need to Make Great Food. The BBC's A History of the World in 100 Objects is about the Admonitions Scroll. This week's Please Explain is all about the history of the New York City subway.

Slide to the Right

Thursday, March 01, 2012

David Brock and Ari Rabin-Havt from the liberal media organization Media Matters describe how Fox News has changed under the leadership of its president Roger Ailes. The BBC series A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at a stone version of a belt worn by players of a Mesoamerican ballgame that was most likely used in rituals. On Backstory Jeremy Scahill, National Security Reporter for the Nation, talks about his recent trip to Yemen and why American counterterrorism policy there is increasingly unpopular.