Streams

Standouts

Monday, April 30, 2012

Warren Littlefield talks about the era of NBC’s Must See TV. James Goldston, head of the Open Society's Justice Initiative on arguing the first case about the CIA's program of extraordinary rendition to be heard in a courtroom. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects is about Pieces of Eight, the world's first global currency. Agnes Gund discusses collecting art and creating Studio in a School. Laurens Grant talks about his documentary “Jesse Owens,” about the famous Olympian.

Invisible Hand

Friday, April 27, 2012

On today’s show: Theoretical physicist Leonard Mlodinow explains how our unconscious mind rules our behavior. Playwright Amy Herzog and actors Gabriel Ebert and Mary Louise Wilson talk about their hit play, “4000 Miles.” Today’s installment of the BBC series A History of the World in 100 Objects is about two late 17th-century Japanese Kakiemon elephants. Plus Please Explain is all about political lobbying!

Trash and Treasure

Thursday, April 26, 2012

On today’s show: Edward Humes traces what happens to the 102 tons of trash that the average American produces after it’s picked up from the curb. Andre Gregory talks about Louis Malle’s last film, which captured a performance of “Uncle Vanya” staged at a crumbling 42nd Street theater in the 1990s. A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at a two-headed serpent mosaic from Aztec Mexico. On Backstory, we look at the controversy surrounding the Texas State Board of Education’s negotiations about what goes into the state’s textbooks, and why it affects the rest of the 49 states. And we'll find out why privacy advocates are worried about a new internet surveillance bill known as CISPA.

More to the Story

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

On today’s show: Rodney King and his fiancee Cynthia Kelley talk about what happened to him that night in March 1991, how it set off a firestorm, and how he's recovered. Richard Zacks tells how Teddy Roosevelt tried to clean up the seedier parts of New York City in the 1890s. A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at a brass plaque depicting the oba, the king of the kingdom of Benin. Writer-director-producer Garry Marshall shares stories from his life in the worlds of television and film. Werner Herzog discusses his profiles of five inmates on death row.

Origins

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

On today’s show: Geneticist Bryan Sykes takes us on a double helixed tour of America. Michael Sandel takes a look at the moral limits of the free market. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects examines a 16th-century mechanical clock in the shape of a galleon. Ballet dancer Natalia Makarova talks about her legendary career. Publishers Amy Einhorn and Ben Schrank discuss the future of books, and how the publishing industry creates bestsellers.

As the World Turns

Monday, April 23, 2012

On today’s show: Michael Moran of the Council on Foreign Relations takes a look at the challenges that are aligning to challenge U.S. leadership and influence around the world. Loung Ung describes her experience as a child during the murderous reign of the Khmer Rouge. A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at one of Albrecht Dürer’s prints of a rhinoceros. Actor and writer Michael Tucker talks about his debut novel, After Annie. Plus, journalist Ben Anderson gives an inside look at the war in Afghanistan and the violence in Helmand province.

Making Progress

Friday, April 20, 2012

On today’s show: Emmy and Peabody Award–winning NPR special foreign correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault talks about her personal journey through the civil rights movement. A 1966 NBC documentary told the story of an African American waiter working in a “whites only” restaurant—that story has been revisited in a film called “Booker’s Place.” Kevin Kline discusses his latest film, “Darling Companion.” Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at a jade dragon cup from Central Asia. Plus, Please Explain is all about movie special effects!

Making a Splash

Thursday, April 19, 2012

On today’s show: Director Mike Nichols and actress Linda Emond discuss the new Broadway production of Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman.” Lynn Sherr talks about why we swim and why humans are so attracted to water. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a small gold model of a llama. On Backstory we’ll learn about efforts to save great apes. Plus, we’ll look at the rise of Brazil as a regional and world superpower.

Subjective and Objective

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

On today’s show: we’ll speak with the chief creative officer and the artistic director of the Tribeca Film Festival about what we can look forward to seeing this time around. John D’Agata and fact-checker Jim Fingal on the use of the truth in writing non-fiction. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at a Ming Dynasty bank note. Plus, Patricia T. O’Conner answers questions about the confounding—and at times discombobulating—English language.

Across the Divide

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

On today’s show: Social scientist Jonathan Haidt looks at why people are so divided by politics and religion. Violinist Philippe Quint and singer-songwriter Nellie McKay discuss their roles in the new film “Downtown Express.” A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a tughra, the official signature of the ruler of the Ottoman Empire. Annalena McAfee discusses her debut novel, The Spoiler. Plus, Michael Lind explains how and why Americans, since the earliest days of the republic, have continuously reinvented our economy.

Unexpected Turns

Monday, April 16, 2012

On today's show: Eric Alterman looks at how the idea of liberalism has changed from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Barack Obama. Benjamin Busch talks about his memoir Dust to Dust. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a statue from Easter Island. Rajesh Parameswaran talks about his collection of stories, I Am an Executioner. Plus Jim Abbott discusses his remarkable baseball career—and about pitching a no-hitter—despite being born without a right hand.

Rise and Shine

Friday, April 13, 2012

On today’s show: we’ll look at the countries that are expected to rise in the years ahead (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), and how they’ll interact with the West. Director Philippe Falardeau talks about his new film, “Monsieur Lazhar.” Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a sculpture of a Huastec goddess. Plus, Please Explain is all about deep sea exploration.

The Mastermind

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Josh Meyer and Terry McDermott give the definitive account of the pursuit and capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed. Renée Fleming discusses her new album, “Poemes.” Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at a carved stone statue of Shiva and his wife Parvati. Daniel Mendelsohn looks at why we're still so interested in the Titanic. Plus, our latest Undereported segment looks at the disturbing practice of milking bears for their bile in China.

Fight for Survival

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

On today’s show: Jeffrey Toobin discusses the Supreme Court and the future of health care legislation. New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn tells the story of her grandmother’s surviving the sinking of the Titanic! Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects is about a painted religious icon from the Byzantine Empire. And the gurus of how-to, Al and Larry Ubell, help you with your home maintenance matters.

A Fine Line

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Science Writer Dick Teresi delves into into some of the complex questions surrounding organ donation and the blurred line between life and death. The current Lord Mayor of Belfast, Ireland, talks about his city’s historic connections to the Titanic. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a reliquary that houses what many believe to be a part of the crown of thorns worn by Jesus Christ. Sax player Bill Evans describes his genre-bending approach to jazz. Plus, Anthony Marx, the President of the New York Public Library, addresses some of the controversy surrounding his institution.

The Big Leagues

Monday, April 09, 2012

On today’s show: we’ll take a look at the new technologies that have allowed researchers to visit the wreckage of the Titanic. Simon Callow talks about his role in the acclaimed new play “Being Shakespeare.” Film preservationist Serge Bromberg discusses some of the rare silent films from around the world that he’s saved. A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at a carved wooden chair from the pre-European Caribbean. Peter Behrens tells us about his new novel, The O’Briens. And R. A. Dickey, of the Mets, describes his life, baseball career, and recent climb up Mt. Kilimanjaro.

Good Friday

Friday, April 06, 2012

On today’s show: Leonard shares some of the greatest recordings about the Easter story on his annual Good Friday Gospel Hour! Then, the BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a set of vases that are the oldest dated blue and white Chinese porcelain in the world. Plus, Please Explain is all about satellites!

Home, Economics

Thursday, April 05, 2012

MIT economist Simon Johnson talks about the national debt. Pulitzer Prize-winner Marilynne Robinson joins us to talk about her celebrated novel Housekeeping for the latest installment of our Book Club. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects continues with a carved life-like Ife Head from medieval Africa. Plus, Matt Taibbi joins us for this week’s Backstory segment about the rocky situation at Bank of America.

Below the Surface

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

On today’s show: a panel discussion representing different outlooks on the controversial natural gas extraction technique known as fracking. Kambri Crews shares her experience growing up with two deaf parents in rural Texas. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects continues with a look at a Hebrew astrolabe, an ancient scientific device used to calculate the time of day. Plus, the former Director for Asian Affairs at the National Security Council talks about North Korea’s troubled present and uncertain future.

Inside Out

Tuesday, April 03, 2012

Van Jones talks about his time as the green jobs advisor to the Obama White House and explains why he resigned after just six months. Then, former "SNL" castmember Rachel Dratch discusses her rollercoaster career and finding happiness when she least expected it. Today’s installment of A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a look at a set of chess pieces that were found on a Scottish beach. Just in time for Passover, Jonathan Safran Foer and Nathan Englander talk about their new version of the Haggadah. Ben Zimmer on the unexpected origins of the word jazz. And, director Steven Ives talks about his new film, “Grand Coulee Dam” a Depression-era public works project that transformed Washington State.

Art and Life

Monday, April 02, 2012

We’ll hear a panel discussion Leonard moderated in WNYC’s Greene Space with a gallery owner, museum curator and two prominent artists about the business of being an artist in New York. Lionel Shriver talks about her novel The New Republic. The BBC’s A History of the World in 100 Objects looks at pot shards from an island off Tanzania. A cloistered nun, Mother Dolores, tells about her former life as a rising star in Hollywood, co-starring with Elvis, and then deciding to become a Benedictine nun. Plus, Nobel Prize-winner Eric R. Kandel talks about the intellectual pioneers of the early 1900s.