Streams

There’s No Retirement When You Can’t Afford to Stop Working

Friday, July 18, 2014

Journalist Jessica Bruder discusses the growing number of older middle-class Americans who can’t afford to retire and have been crossing the country in RVs. Instead of vacationing, they’ve become migrant workers, taking temporary jobs doing things like picking blueberries in Kentucky, selling roadside Christmas trees, giving tours at Dollywood, taking tickets at NASCAR events, and maintaining campgrounds in National Parks. For her cover story for Harper's, “The End of Retirement,” Bruder travels the country, profiling people who must keep working well past retirement age just to make ends meet.

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Guest Picks: Audrey Tautou

Friday, July 18, 2014

French actress Audrey Tautou was on the Lopate Show July 17, 2014, to talk about her role in the movie "Mood Indigo," along with director Michel Gondry.

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Garry Winogrand Retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum

Friday, July 18, 2014

Jeff Rosenheim, The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Curator in Charge of the Department of Photographs, talks about the first retrospective in 25 years of work by Garry Winogrand, the renowned photographer of New York City and of American life from the 1950s through the early 1980s. The retrospective brings together more than 175 of the artist's iconic images, unseen prints, and even Winogrand’s famed series of photographs made at the Metropolitan Museum in 1969. The exhibition "Garry Winogrand" is on view through September 21.

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Guest Picks: Michel Gondry

Friday, July 18, 2014

French filmmaker Michel Gondry was on the Lopate Show July 17, 2014, to talk about his movie "Mood Indigo," along with Audrey Tautou. He's a fan of the writer Gogol. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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There’s No Retirement When You Can’t Afford to Stop Working

Friday, July 18, 2014

On today’s show, we’ll look at the growing number of middle-class Americans who can’t afford to retire and who’ve become migrant laborers working at temporary jobs around the country. David Benjamin tells us about using corn stalks and mushroom roots as building materials—he’s created a tower out of them in the courtyard of MoMA PS1 in Long Island City. We’ll find out about a retrospective of photographer Garry Winogrand’s work, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This week’s Please Explain is all about herbs.

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How to Grow and Use Herbs

Friday, July 18, 2014

This week’s Please Explain, Dr. Michael J. Balick of the New York Botanical Garden talks about herbs! He’ll explain how to grow them and use them in cooking, medicine, cleaning, and more, and he’ll discuss the relationship between humans, plants, and culture. He’s the author of the new book Rodale's 21st-Century Herbal: A Practical Guide for Healthy Living Using Nature's Most Powerful Plants.

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How Big Businesses Evade Taxes, Costing the Rest of Us Money

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Allan Sloan, Senior Editor at Large for Fortune magazine, explains why a growing number of American companies have been dodging U.S. taxes by reincorporating overseas. He looks at what it means for business, the economy, and for the taxpayers left behind. His article “Positively Un-American” is the cover story for the July 21, 2014, issue of Fortune.

 

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Iraqi and Afghan Asylum Seekers Are Struggling in the U.S.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Roughly 13,000 refugees from Iraq and Afghanistan have come to the United States on special visas since 2008. Many of them provided critical assistance to the United States in their home country by working as interpreters and fixers. Men’s Journal contributing editor Paul Solotaroff has investigated the difficult route to asylum in the United States these people face and their many struggles when they finally get here. His articles "The Interpreters We Left Behind" and "Afghan Interpreters Struggle to Find a Home in the U.S." have been published in Men's Journal.

 

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Fighting to Keep Manufacturing in America

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The Bassett Furniture Company, based in Bassett, Virginia, was once the world's biggest wood furniture manufacturer. But beginning in the 1980s, a flood of cheap Asian furniture made it hard for Bassett to compete. Beth Macy tells the story of how John Bassett III watched one family company embrace globalization while fighting to keep the other right here at home. Macy's book Factory Man reveals some shocking truths about American business, including the fallout of offshoring on communities across the country.

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Leaving America, Struggling to Stay in America

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Allan Sloan of Fortune magazine talks about the growing number of American companies reincorporating overseas in order to dodge US taxes. Filmmaker Michel Gondry tells us about his latest movie, “Mood Indigo,” and he’ll be joined by Audrey Tautou, who stars in it. Beth Macy with the story of how an American company struggled to compete with cheap furniture from China, and managed to keep manufacturing in Virginia, saving hundreds of jobs. We’ll look into why the population of great white sharks is rebounding off of the coast of New York and New Jersey. Plus, some Afghan and Iraqi interpreters who worked with the United States have been able to emigrate to this country, and we’ll find out why they’ve found little support here.  

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Why Great White Sharks Are Making a Comeback in NY and NJ

Thursday, July 17, 2014

After decades of decline, the population of great white sharks off the coast of New York and New Jersey is making a comeback. Researchers are even beginning to wonder if there may be a white shark nursery in the area. N.O.A.A. shark researcher Tobey Curtis joins us to explain why the population is making a comeback and why more white sharks is a good thing for the environment.

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Michel Gondry and Audrey Tautou on the Surreal Romance, “Mood Indigo”

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Director Michel Gondry and actress Audrey Tautou discuss the new movie “Mood Indigo.” It’s an imaginative romance based on the novel of the same name by Boris Vian, and tells the story of Colin, a wealthy young inventor, who is looking for love. With the help of his cook Nicolas and best friend, he meets, and marries, Chloe. But after their wedding, Chloe falls ill, and Colin resorts to increasingly desperate methods to save her life. “Mood Indigo” opens at the Landmark Sunshine Cinema July 18.

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The War That Gave Us 'Cooties'

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

World War I began 100 years ago, and our word maven, Patricia T. O’Conner, looks at the words that came out of that war—like blimp, doughboy, cooties. She’ll also answer questions about language and grammar. An updated and expanded third edition of O’Conner’s book, Woe is I: The Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English in Plain English, is available in paperback, as is  Origins of the Specious, written with Stewart Kellerman.

If you have a question about language and grammar, leave a comment or call us at 212-433-9692!

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There's Nothing Gross about Eating Your Kids' Chewed-up Meatloaf

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Dan Pashman, host of the podcast The Sporkful, and Hillary Frank, host of The Longest Shortest Time podcast, share tips on eating with kids and how to raise adventurous eaters. They offer advice on how parents who want a decent meal can cope with difficult kids who won’t eat, the hierarchy of your kids' leftover foods, as well as techniques for eating those leftovers.

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Tribute: James MacGregor Burns

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

James MacGregor Burns was one of our country’s most important political historians. He won the Pulitzer for his book on Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1970, and spent his life writing about the nature of leadership in general, and the presidency in particular. He died at the age of 95. But you can still hear Leonard’s interview with him from 2003.

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The Statue of Liberty Was One Man's Quixotic Pet Project

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The Statue of Liberty is one of the most recognizable monuments in the world, a symbol of freedom and the American dream. For decades, the myth has persisted that the statue was a grand gift from France, but Elizabeth Mitchell reveals that the Statue of Liberty was in fact the pet project of one quixotic and visionary French sculptor, Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi. Bartholdi not only forged this 151-foot-tall colossus in a workshop in Paris and transported her across the ocean. Mitchell tells the story of the statue in Liberty's Torch: The Great Adventure to Build the Statue of Liberty.

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Five Men Fled the French Revolution - and Ended Up Shaping America

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

In 1789, as the French Revolution shook Europe, the new United States was struggling for survival in the face of financial insolvency and bitter political and regional divisions. Five Frenchmen who’d been among the leaders of the French Revolution sought refuge in America, a country they idealized because it seemed to be an embodiment of the Enlightenment ideals they celebrated. Francois Furstenberg writes about the Frenchmen’s American adventures, as they adapted to American life and eventually became enmeshed in Franco-American diplomacy. His book When the United States Spoke French: Five Refugees Who Shaped a Nation explores the tumultuous first years of the United States and looks at how these men helped shape American history. 

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Growing Good Eaters

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Dan Pashman, host of “The Sporkful,” and Hillary Frank, host of “The Longest Shortest Time,” share tips on what to feed kids and how to raise adventurous eaters. We’ll learn about the adventures of five Frenchmen who sought refuge in America during the French Revolution, and the ways they helped shape American history. Elizabeth Mitchell tells the story of the visionary French sculptor who designed the Statue of Liberty and brought it to New York. Plus, our word maven Patricia T. O’Conner talks about words from WWI and she answers listener questions about language and grammar!

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Questions for Akhil Sharma

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

What are some of your favorite books/who are some of your favorite authors?

The writer who has been most important to me is Ernest Hemingway, in particular his short stories and the two masterpieces: The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms. At one point I had read him so closely that he was my ideal of what writing has to be to be good.

The current writers I am reading avidly to see what I can learn are Lorrie Moore and Tobias Wolff. They are both extraordinary writers. Also, when you read them, you begin to get a sense of the writer's personality and in their personalities, in how they respond to situations with both laughter and seriousness, there appear to be solutions as to how to live one's life.

The writer that I think everybody should read is Joseph Roth. This great Austro Hungarian writer has a style that is ironic like Flaubert and yet with a direct moral engagement like Tolstoy. I especially recommend Radetzky March and The Tale of the 1102nd Night

What have you read or watched lately that you were moved or inspired by?

I am reading Eugene Oenegin by Pushkin again and his language is both plain and plastic and this is infecting my writing to a tremendous extent. Reading him I begin to see that what we mean by consistency of style can sometimes be a lack of conviction that the reader will follow along.

Do you have favorite words? Least favorite words? What are they and why?

There are words that I feel my characters overuse: shame, belly, sadness. I say that they overuse them, but their lives are difficult and they are working through things.

The words that I wished I had more often in my writing are: cheerful, laughing, kind, teased. 

 I want to have more of these words in my writing because I think these words would add to the complications and richness of the worlds that I create.

Do you have writing rituals? Where and when and how do you write?

I write with a stopwatch. If a phone call comes I stop my stopwatch. If I check my email I stop my stopwatch. The idea is to keep myself honest so that I know how much work I actually did in any single day.

I have a desk in my apartment which is crowded with all sorts of books and scraps of paper. When I was working on my novel, drafts of my novel sat on the floor around me.

Every time a project is over I clean my desk and the relief is like getting a very short haircut in the summer. 

 

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Guest Picks: Ken Griffey, Sr.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Ken Griffey, Sr. was on the Lopate Show to talk about his new memoir Big Red: Baseball, Fatherhood, and My Life in the Big Red Machine. When he's not writing or talking about baseball, he's reading the Bourne series. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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