Streams

Why We Hang on to Too Much Stuff – and How to Stop

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Hoarding is a disorder marked by the persistent need to hold onto things and extreme anxiety at the thought of having to part with objects, even things with no value or use. But even people who don’t have hoarding tendencies can find it difficult to get rid of things and to clear away clutter. Dr. Simon Rego, Director of Psychology Training and Director of the Cognitive Behavior Therapy Training Program at Montefiore Medical Center, and Collette Shine, who runs a professional organizing company called Organize and Shine and is the New York Chapter President of the National Association of Professional Organizers, discuss the psychology behind clutter and hoarding, why we find it so hard to let go of certain items, and what that reveals about our personality.

 

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Trying to Escape Violence, Gangs, and Crushing Poverty by Coming to America

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Ian Gordon, editor at Mother Jones, discusses the issue of what to do with the child immigrants crossing into the United States. He’s traced the journey back home for children that are deported and he has reported from the shelters built to house migrants in the interim. Gordon discusses the Mexican government's response to Central American migrants, why border agents shouldn't decide whether child migrants can stay, and looks at why child migrants are fleeing their home countries. His most recent article about the crisis is “70,000 Kids Will Show Up Alone at Our Border This Year. What Happens to Them?” and is in the July/August issue of Mother Jones.

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Music Brings Ailing Brains Thrillingly to Life

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Director Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about his film “Alive Inside,” which looks at the power music has to reawaken memories in people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. He’s joined by Dan Cohen, founder and executive director of Music & Memory, a non-profit that brings personalized music into the lives of the elderly and infirm. “Alive Inside” opens July 18 at the Landmark Sunshine Cinema.

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Why We Hang on to Too Much Stuff

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

We’ll take a look at the psychology behind hoarding and how we can learn to purge what we don’t need and live with less. Michael Rossato-Bennett on his documentary “Alive Inside,” about the healing power of music. He’ll be joined by Dan Cohen, founder of Music & Memory, who uses music to treat Alzheimer’s patients. We’ll find out about how the things Marlon Brando read, collected, and cared about influenced his performances. Ian Gordon, editor at Mother Jones magazine, on what happens to the unaccompanied child immigrants who are sent back home after they’ve crossed into the United States.

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Jonathan Demme, André Gregory, and Wallace Shawn on Making 'A Master Builder'

Monday, July 21, 2014

Jonathan Demme, André Gregory, and Wallace Shawn discuss bringing their interpretation of Henrik Ibsen’s “The Master Builder” to the screen. This Ibsen classic tells the tale of a successful, egomaniacal architect who has spent a lifetime bullying his wife, employees, and mistresses, and who wants to make peace with himself as his life approaches its final act. Wallace Shawn, who wrote the screenplay, plays the cruel, guilt-ridden architect. Director Jonathan Demme based his direction on the stage production by André Gregory. The film “A Master Builder” premiers at July 23 at Film Forum.

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Do You Have to Be Crazy to Be a Genius?

Monday, July 21, 2014

Neuroscientist and literary scholar Nancy C. Andreasen tries to answer the question: If high IQ does not indicate creative genius, then where does the trait come from, and why is it so often accompanied by mental illness? Andreasen has studied the neuroscience of mental illness and has worked with many gifted subjects, including Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, and John Cheever, from the Iowa Writers' Workshop to investigate the science of genius. She’s currently working with artists and scientists including George Lucas, the mathematician William Thurston, the novelist Jane Smiley, and six Nobel laureates. Her article “Secrets of the Creative Brain” is the cover story of the July/August issue of The Atlantic

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From Mandela’s Enemy to His Right Hand

Monday, July 21, 2014

Zelda la Grange grew up white in segregated South Africa, supporting the regime and the rules of apartheid. Her conservative family referred to the imprisoned Nelson Mandela as “a terrorist.” Yet just a few years after his release and the end of apartheid, she had become one of the president’s most loyal and devoted associates. La Grange’s memoir, Good Morning, Mr. Mandela, looks back at her time as one of Mandela’s private secretaries during his presidency and as an aid and spokesperson in his retirement. Working and traveling by his Mandela’s for almost two decades, La Grange found herself negotiating with celebrities and world leaders, supporting Mr. Mandela in his many roles.

 

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Our Delusional Brains

Monday, July 21, 2014

Joel Gold and Ian Gold take us on a journey through the delusional brain to explore the intersection of neuroscience, biology, and culture. The current view of delusions is that they are the result of biology gone awry, of neurons in the brain misfiring, but the Golds argue that delusions are in fact the result of the interaction between the brain and the social world. Their new book, Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness uses case studies and the latest research in schizophrenia, and looks at the role of culture and the social world in the development of psychosis. 

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The World Around Us Shapes the Delusions Inside Us

Monday, July 21, 2014

On today’s show: Zelda la Grange grew up supporting the rules of apartheid in South Africa, but she later became one of Nelson Mandela’s most loyal and devoted aides. She tells us about working and traveling by Mandela’s side for almost two decades. Jonathan Demme, André Gregory, and Wallace Shawn discuss bringing their interpretation of Henrik Ibsen’s “A Master Builder” to the screen. We’ll investigate how interactions between the brain and the world around us can give rise to delusional thinking. Neuroscientist Nancy C. Andreasen looks into where creative genius comes from and why it’s so often accompanied by mental illness.

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There’s No Retirement When You Can’t Afford to Stop Working

Friday, July 18, 2014

Journalist Jessica Bruder discusses the growing number of older middle-class Americans who can’t afford to retire and have been crossing the country in RVs. Instead of vacationing, they’ve become migrant workers, taking temporary jobs doing things like picking blueberries in Kentucky, selling roadside Christmas trees, giving tours at Dollywood, taking tickets at NASCAR events, and maintaining campgrounds in National Parks. For her cover story for Harper's, “The End of Retirement,” Bruder travels the country, profiling people who must keep working well past retirement age just to make ends meet.

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Guest Picks: Audrey Tautou

Friday, July 18, 2014

French actress Audrey Tautou was on the Lopate Show July 17, 2014, to talk about her role in the movie "Mood Indigo," along with director Michel Gondry.

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Garry Winogrand Retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum

Friday, July 18, 2014

Jeff Rosenheim, The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Curator in Charge of the Department of Photographs, talks about the first retrospective in 25 years of work by Garry Winogrand, the renowned photographer of New York City and of American life from the 1950s through the early 1980s. The retrospective brings together more than 175 of the artist's iconic images, unseen prints, and even Winogrand’s famed series of photographs made at the Metropolitan Museum in 1969. The exhibition "Garry Winogrand" is on view through September 21.

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Guest Picks: Michel Gondry

Friday, July 18, 2014

French filmmaker Michel Gondry was on the Lopate Show July 17, 2014, to talk about his movie "Mood Indigo," along with Audrey Tautou. He's a fan of the writer Gogol. Find out what else he's a fan of!

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There’s No Retirement When You Can’t Afford to Stop Working

Friday, July 18, 2014

On today’s show, we’ll look at the growing number of middle-class Americans who can’t afford to retire and who’ve become migrant laborers working at temporary jobs around the country. David Benjamin tells us about using corn stalks and mushroom roots as building materials—he’s created a tower out of them in the courtyard of MoMA PS1 in Long Island City. We’ll find out about a retrospective of photographer Garry Winogrand’s work, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This week’s Please Explain is all about herbs.

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How to Grow and Use Herbs

Friday, July 18, 2014

This week’s Please Explain, Dr. Michael J. Balick of the New York Botanical Garden talks about herbs! He’ll explain how to grow them and use them in cooking, medicine, cleaning, and more, and he’ll discuss the relationship between humans, plants, and culture. He’s the author of the new book Rodale's 21st-Century Herbal: A Practical Guide for Healthy Living Using Nature's Most Powerful Plants.

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How Big Businesses Evade Taxes, Costing the Rest of Us Money

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Allan Sloan, Senior Editor at Large for Fortune magazine, explains why a growing number of American companies have been dodging U.S. taxes by reincorporating overseas. He looks at what it means for business, the economy, and for the taxpayers left behind. His article “Positively Un-American” is the cover story for the July 21, 2014, issue of Fortune.

 

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Iraqi and Afghan Asylum Seekers Are Struggling in the U.S.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Roughly 13,000 refugees from Iraq and Afghanistan have come to the United States on special visas since 2008. Many of them provided critical assistance to the United States in their home country by working as interpreters and fixers. Men’s Journal contributing editor Paul Solotaroff has investigated the difficult route to asylum in the United States these people face and their many struggles when they finally get here. His articles "The Interpreters We Left Behind" and "Afghan Interpreters Struggle to Find a Home in the U.S." have been published in Men's Journal.

 

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Fighting to Keep Manufacturing in America

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The Bassett Furniture Company, based in Bassett, Virginia, was once the world's biggest wood furniture manufacturer. But beginning in the 1980s, a flood of cheap Asian furniture made it hard for Bassett to compete. Beth Macy tells the story of how John Bassett III watched one family company embrace globalization while fighting to keep the other right here at home. Macy's book Factory Man reveals some shocking truths about American business, including the fallout of offshoring on communities across the country.

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Leaving America, Struggling to Stay in America

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Allan Sloan of Fortune magazine talks about the growing number of American companies reincorporating overseas in order to dodge US taxes. Filmmaker Michel Gondry tells us about his latest movie, “Mood Indigo,” and he’ll be joined by Audrey Tautou, who stars in it. Beth Macy with the story of how an American company struggled to compete with cheap furniture from China, and managed to keep manufacturing in Virginia, saving hundreds of jobs. We’ll look into why the population of great white sharks is rebounding off of the coast of New York and New Jersey. Plus, some Afghan and Iraqi interpreters who worked with the United States have been able to emigrate to this country, and we’ll find out why they’ve found little support here.  

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Why Great White Sharks Are Making a Comeback in NY and NJ

Thursday, July 17, 2014

After decades of decline, the population of great white sharks off the coast of New York and New Jersey is making a comeback. Researchers are even beginning to wonder if there may be a white shark nursery in the area. N.O.A.A. shark researcher Tobey Curtis joins us to explain why the population is making a comeback and why more white sharks is a good thing for the environment.

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